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Wiz Khalifa – High Today Lyrics

Tell ’em
You don’t need a jet to get high like me
[Refrain: Wiz Khalifa]
I started off slow, but I finally made it
No matter the cost, chances I’m takin’
Ride with my dawgs, no, we ain’t fakin’
Travel the world, countin’ up faces
Jump in my car, roll up and face it
No, I don’t call, I’m on her faces
All of ’em model, none of ’em basic
Girl, I’m a star, look in amazement
[Verse 1: Wiz Khalifa]
Top of the game, that’s where my place is
Started off small, runnin’ from cases
Can’t take it back, I can’t erase it
Money got long, I’m tryna chase it
Puffin’ the J, I wanna get paid
It’s one and the same, but that’s every day
I’m livin’ my life as real as I say
I spent it all once, so I’m tryna save
I’m rollin’ that dank, she pourin’ that drank
I’m out of my brain, weed got me all faded
Lovin’ my life, I’m never gon’ trade it
I want success, don’t wanna be famous
Know how to stay on your grind, it’s contagious
Rollies with diamonds for time that it’s takin’
People these days, they easily change
But I stay the same ’cause life’s what you make it
[Refrain: Wiz Khalifa]
I started off slow, but I finally made it
No matter the cost, chances I’m takin’
Ride with my dawgs, no, we ain’t fakin’
Travel the world, countin’ up faces
Jump in my car, roll up and face it
No, I don’t call, I’m on her faces
All of ’em model, none of ’em basic
Girl, I’m a star, look in amazement
[Chorus: Logic]
Where is my mind? Tell ’em
You don’t need a jet to get high like me
[Verse 2: Logic]
From the sun up to the sundown
No, we never come down
Bobby Boy loud when he come around
Drivin’ down Malibu
Stay driven like the valet do, I be cruisin’
Steady winnin’, but I’m playin’ like I’m losin’
I know that this shit can be confusin’
Talkin’ rap, talkin’ life, talkin’ choosin’
Money over happiness, abusin’
Losin’ your mind, losin’ your heart
Second that I wake up, I feel like this world just wants to tear me apart
But I don’t
Let it get me down, let it fuck me up
What my therapist say
They don’t matter, no way
[Refrain: Wiz Khalifa]
I started off slow, but I finally made it
No matter the cost, chances I’m takin’
Ride with my dawgs, no, we ain’t fakin’
Travel the world, countin’ up faces
Jump in my car, roll up and face it
No, I don’t call, I’m on her faces
All of ’em model, none of ’em basic
Girl, I’m a star, look in amazement It’s far away
Up in the sky, I’m high today
Break it on   down,   then we rollin’   it up
I can see my house   from up here
Who needs a jet when you’re fly like me? Play this song
[Chorus: Logic]
Where is my mind? It’s far away
Up in the sky, I’m high today
Break it on down, then we rollin’ it up
I can see my house from up here
Who needs a jet when you’re fly like me?

Points of Progress: Hawaii’s state bird makes a comeback, and more

It took 60 years of collaborative work and recovery efforts to bring back the endangered species. The law, which received support from the USAID Judicial Reform in Uzbekistan program, covers all areas of life – political, economic, educational, familial – where gender discrimination is likely to occur. But there is political will to change the status quo. (The Guardian, Forbes)3. A roundup of positive stories to inspire you. In accordance with the law, any person has the right to take a gender discrimination case to court. The state’s only native goose numbered just 30 in 1960. UzbekistanUzbekistan has adopted the country’s first gender equality law. 4. 2. More significantly, it requires police to register cases within two hours of parents reporting their child missing. Points of Progress: Hawaii’s state bird makes a comeback, and more

Why We Wrote This

This is more than feel-good news – it’s where the world is making concrete progress. Staff

Places where the world saw progress, for the April 27 & May 4, 2020 Monitor Weekly. The official announcement downlisting the nene from endangered to threatened in December 2019 marks a tremendous achievement of Hawaii’s conservation community. With protection under the Endangered Species Act, along with captive breeding and rigorous habitat restoration, the number of nene rose to more than 3,000 in 2019. Although the nation’s constitution guarantees equal rights, gender-based discrimination is still firmly entrenched. Nearly 10 cases of abused children are reported daily, with girls being disproportionately represented. Since 2016, President Shavkat Mirziyoyev has been ushering in fundamental policy changes, including changes related to women’s rights. PakistanPakistan has passed the country’s first law against child abuse, called the Zainab Alert Law. State officials and conservationists continue to work to keep the species protected in “the endangered species capital of the world.” (The Los Angeles Times, Hawaii Magazine)

NHPA/Photoshot/Newscom

A captive breeding program that lasted 60 years has brought Hawaii’s state bird, the nene, back from the brink of extinction. April 17, 2020

By Nusmila Lohani
Staff writer

1. United StatesHawaii’s state bird, the nene (pronounced nay-nay), once on the brink of extinction, has made a comeback. (USAID, UZDaily) Loading… (The Guardian, GeoTV)

B.K. President Arif Alvi signed the bill into law on March 19, calling it an excellent initiative to fast-track missing child cases by using technology. SenegalThe African manatee, classified as a vulnerable species, is receiving unprecedented support. The law includes measures such as the establishment of a designated helpline and an agency dedicated to issuing missing child alerts. It comes into effect two years after Zainab Ansari, variously reported as 6 or 7 years old, was kidnapped, raped, and murdered, which sparked a nationwide outcry. From creating an aquatic reserve in 2014 – where 100 manatees live now – to extending the conservation work into other parts of Africa, researchers and experts are making headway in their manatee conservation efforts. African manatees, estimated to be around 10,000 in number spread across 21 African countries, face many threats, including poaching and entrapment in dams. Bangash/AP/File

Mohammed Amin holds a picture of his daughter, whose abduction spurred a law against child abuse. The first African manatee symposium, scheduled for April but postponed due to concerns over the spread of the coronavirus, would have drawn 50 manatee conservationists from nine African countries and from Florida, Brazil, and Malaysia.
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Pregnant girls and teenage mothers have been banned from state schools since 1961. From oyster bed restoration projects to the increase in marine protected areas, conservation efforts are growing worldwide. TanzaniaThe government of Tanzania issued a public statement on April 6 in favor of ensuring access to education for pregnant girls. Still, scientists emphasize the need for tough regulations to counter effects of climate change as ocean pollution and overfishing remain challenges in many parts of the world. (The Guardian, Nature) (Thomson Reuters Foundation, The World Bank)WorldwideMarine life could be restored by 2050, says a new scientific review published in the journal Nature. The announcement is tied to approval of a $500 million World Bank education loan to Tanzania, which had been delayed amid concerns over the country’s treatment of pregnant teens. The World Bank-funded project will allow pregnant students to attend alternative education centers for their exams and later return to state schools. 5. Evidence suggests that increasing access to secondary education for girls is likely to lead to stronger economic growth and lower fertility rates. Numbers of previously endangered populations are also rebounding, such as humpback whales, Canadian sea otters, elephant seals in the United States, and green turtles in Japan. Global fishing is becoming more sustainable. Tanzania, the largest country in East Africa, has one of the world’s highest teen pregnancy rates, partly due to sexual violence and poverty; about 5,500 pregnant girls drop out of school each year. The destruction of seagrass meadows and mangroves, natural barriers against rising seas, is almost at a halt.

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How European countries are trying to safely end lockdowns

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They can restart the society in many other ways.”Some Danish schools have delayed their reopening to Monday to have more time to prepare and be able to adhere to government guidelines on hygiene and conduct. Usually we believe and trust in the authorities here in Denmark, but in this case it makes no sense. These include marking pathways to and from classrooms, seating children two yards apart, washing hands every hour, and playing in smaller groups.“It is of course quite difficult to follow this guideline considering the group of age,” says Dorte Lange, vice president of The Danish Union of Teachers. It is unclear what that decision might cost them. “But the authorities say that they have calculated the risk.”Given the different epidemiological dynamics across and within the nations of Europe, Professor McKee sees a unified exit strategy as unlikely. “Many parents in Denmark don’t like this situation, but most of them will do it because they have to start their jobs and the government wants it. He and his wife decided not to send three of their kids back to school for fear of contracting or spreading the disease. School absences are typically penalized and could eventually put child subsidies at risk.“The consequences will all be financial, and that is bad enough, but it is nothing compared to the well-being of our children and the well-being of our family,” says Mr. Hansen. While methods will differ, the shared goal is to reduce transmission. Taking care of a large family and juggling the farm requires optimal health, especially since grandparents cannot be leaned on at this time. The pandemic will “fizzle out” when “every person who is infected is transmitting it to fewer than one other person.”  

Italy, which suffered the highest fatalities in the pandemic, is allowing some shops to reopen, but some regions have boycotted that decision. Loading… Austria and Denmark in particular are leading the way in restarting businesses and reopening schools.But plenty of concern remains, not just among business owners and customers, teachers and parents. )

By Dominique Soguel
Correspondent

Denise Hruby
Contributor

Even as the coronavirus pandemic continues to paralyze much of Europe, some countries – primarily the smaller ones that responded quickly to the outbreak – are beginning to try to relaunch society in the hopes that they have turned a corner. Germany, which has managed to keep its per capita death toll relatively low, has also announced plans to begin allowing small businesses to reopen next week under tight restrictions.But reopening holds risks, even for those countries who have so far contained the coronavirus. He kept three on shortened work hours and let go of the other two but hopes to rehire them once business goes back to normal.“Honestly, I had very mixed feelings about opening again,” says Mr. Pulfer. Construction workers have gotten the green light to resume their activities in Spain, but the state of emergency there has been extended. How European countries are trying to safely end lockdowns

Why We Wrote This

While everyone wants their national coronavirus lockdown to be over, figuring out how to phase it out safely is a task fraught with problems. Pulfer turns away an elderly woman who walks in without a mask, for her own safety.“I’m not afraid of getting sick. Most shoppers and customers sported surgical masks, which are widely available at pharmacies and grocery stores. Austria and Denmark in particular are leading the way in restarting businesses and reopening schools.Editor’s note: As a public service,   all our coronavirus coverage   is free. “I was looking forward to get back to work, after a month at home. … The economic loss is very, very big.”At Fellner’s flower shop, Ms. Their concerns have been aired on a Facebook group, and an online petition urging authorities to allow parents to keep their children home has garnered nearly 18,000 signatures.Steen Hansen, a cereal grower and cattle farmer living near the third-largest Danish city of Odense, considers it an outright terrible idea. Now the Alpine nation, which has so far reported about 14,300 cases and nearly 400 deaths, has allowed garden centers, DIY stores, and small shops to reopen as part of its first step toward normalcy.Vienna’s largest shopping street, Mariahilfer Strasse, was quiet Tuesday morning, with just a few pedestrians roaming the streets and venturing in to shops. The pandemic has claimed more than 136,000 lives across the aging continent and, in many cases, has taken a devastating toll on health systems and the economy.But many countries are starting to consider how to bring an end to their respective lockdowns. Hansen. He had five employees before the lockdown started March 16. The Dutch tulips are missing, but at least the orchids and roses are in. It proved a controversial decision that has left many parents and educators worried. In Europe, Austria and Denmark are two of the first to tackle it. Other countries will be watching closely.”Finding a path backCountering the spread of the coronavirus has meant strict lockdowns within European nations and the reimposition of long-abandoned borders between them. “I’m just happy to be here, back at work, and that the company I work for still exists. On account of the coronavirus pandemic, he is reluctant to send his children back to school as classes resume in Denmark. Singapore, which was widely praised for its handling of the pandemic, is now fighting to flatten the curve again. Staff are on reduced work hours, and supply chains have been disrupted. “But we’re selling a lot of flowers for people’s balconies, a lot of spring plants that need to be planted in people’s gardens now, and I can tell some were looking forward to finally buy them.”Even as the pandemic continues to paralyze much of Europe, some countries – primarily the smaller ones that responded quickly to the outbreak – are beginning to try to relaunch society in the hopes that they have turned a corner. Lisi Niesner/Reuters

Brigitte Fiala, owner of the shoe store Shu, serves a customer in Vienna, Austria, on April 14, 2020 after the Austrian government loosened its lockdown restrictions during the coronavirus outbreak. But   I   knew it’s not going to be easy. While France and Belgium are holding back, Italy and Spain, the two worst hit, are inching forward. Others donned homemade fabric ones with checkered or polka dot designs.Only a handful of small businesses opened their doors on day one.“People are still very scared. In scramble for supplies, states start banding togetherBut plenty of concern remains, not just among business owners and customers, teachers and parents. I swap the gloves I’m wearing and I have several face masks,” says Ms. That’s important for me, that this company won’t go, that it will survive this crisis.”“Usually we trust in the authorities”Denmark, another frontrunner in reopening, is taking a different approach. … It is not their own choice but they will bring the disease to their parents and not all parents are young.”

Courtesy of the Hansen family

Danish farmer Steen Hansen stands in a field holding one of his children. Experts warn that reopening too quickly could set off a second wave of infections – meaning those nations will have to tread a careful path.“The countries looking at easing restrictions are ones that can see that the death toll is now falling,” says Martin McKee, professor of European public health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. April 17, 2020

Two ways to read the story

Quick Read
Deep Read ( 6 Min. The European Union on Wednesday warned its 27 members to tread carefully as they craft their national exit strategies.“A lack of coordination in lifting restrictive measures risks having negative effects for all member states and creating political friction,” noted a roadmap document cited by The Associated Press.Austria was one of the first European countries after Italy to impose strict lockdown measures, including the closure of restaurants, bars, theaters, schools, and nonessential businesses. After five weeks of staying put on the farm with his family and shifting all the shopping online, he wants to be sure that sending his little ones back to school is safe.“We are shocked that the government wants to restart society this way, with the most innocent citizens, the ones who have a hard time to understand all the precautions that are necessary,” says Mr. No paywall. But I think very slowly they’ll get accustomed to this new reality and they’ll start going out and shopping again – at least that’s my hope,” says Adrian Alfaro, owner of the INTI ethnic clothes and   jewelry store by the Westbahnhof train station. “It is hard to explain to the youngest children to stay apart from other kids and other grown-ups, to wash and disinfect your hands all the time, and not to play in bigger groups. And while spring is in the air, the streets largely remain quiet.“People are timid and still worried,” she said. Alfaro, who wears a light blue surgical mask and makes a point of regularly washing his hands and maintaining social distance. Other countries will be watching closely.”

Basel, Switzerland; and Vienna, Austria
Claudia Pulfer was excited to be back at work in the Fellner Gardening and Florist shop in the Florisdorf district of Vienna Tuesday, as Austria began to roll back its anti-coronavirus lockdown.It clearly wasn’t business as usual. “Of course, the unanswered question is whether this will continue as they do ease up, but only time will tell. “Of course, the unanswered question is whether this will continue as they do ease up, but only time will tell. The government decided to reopen kindergartens and schools for the youngest children. Experts warn that reopening too quickly could set off a second wave of infections – meaning those nations will have to tread a careful path.“The countries looking at easing restrictions are ones that can see that the death toll is now falling,” says Martin McKee, professor of European public health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.
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“It will be absolutely essential for any country thinking of lifting restrictions to have in place a robust system of testing and contact tracing,” he says. No paywall. “There will inevitably be further outbreaks but it is crucial that they are nipped in the bud.”Editor’s note: As a public service,   all our coronavirus coverage   is free.

From Wuhan to quarantine: a writer looks back

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Arek Rataj/AP

People wearing face masks walk down a deserted street in Wuhan in central China’s Hubei Province Jan. I wouldn’t know if I could really leave until the moment I climbed on the train.But I made it on board and the train slipped away, speeding toward my small hometown. ***I woke up at 5 a.m. Shops and restaurants were all closed in early February. Friends and colleagues kept sending me messages: Can you get out? When I asked one man in his 60s why he didn’t wear a mask, he said he didn’t know why people should. People are cautiously heading out, equipped with hats, gloves, and masks, though others are still at home, afraid. I’d made it to the train station, packed with passengers in masks. From Wuhan to quarantine: a writer looks back

Why We Wrote This

Amid the pandemic, people around the world are experiencing the kinds of confusion and courage that Wuhan lived with for months. He’d never heard about the outbreak.Surgery masks were useless, my taxi driver said, when I finally got off the train to transfer to a bus. Besides, I had nowhere to go. Here we were, 17 years later, still asking the same question. The decision seemed so arbitrary. Ng Han Guan/AP

A resident gets a ride from her dog along a retail street in Wuhan, China April 9, 2020. The next morning, on the first day of the New Year, my temperature was 37.3 C (99.1 F).Once again, I was too worried to sleep. Outside raced by scenery like writer Peter Hessler describes in “Oracle Bones”   – “patterned as wallpaper: a peasant, a field, a road, a village.” But that day, there were no peasants. I’d seen so many scenes in the hospital, and knew what being caught here might mean   – no hospital beds, scarce supplies, no friends. The road was wide, with street lights on, but there was no one on the street   – just a few cars passing by. As a reporter, I should be there.I didn’t know there was a possibility I couldn’t leave.By 7 a.m. Out my window was the bus station, now closed, though a dozen taxis waited day and night. April 17, 2020

Two ways to read the story

Quick Read
Deep Read ( 5 Min. No answer.It was a normal winter morning: a little humid, not chilly, sky still dark. Residents must scan a personal code on their phone   and take their temperature before entering or leaving their neighborhoods. “The one you wear is just for psychological comfort,” he said. Some are mourning their dead   – and a newly revised death toll puts the city’s estimate 50% higher than previously thought, with 3,869 people having lost their lives.Still, it seems so different from the Wuhan I visited in January   – the Wuhan I barely left in time. At the entrance of the neighborhood, guards checked our passes, IDs, and temperatures.Gradually, the city has gone back to normal. Beijing and Wuhan
There are traffic jams in Wuhan.Normally, that wouldn’t be news. One week before, my editor had called, asking if I wanted to go to Wuhan, where the first few deaths had been reported. But could I?I packed at top speed   and rushed to the lobby, trying to call a taxi online. I’ve wondered if my decision to leave that morning was right. The streets were wet, after a shower. I had to protect them.As the morning sunshine gradually brightened up, I decided to go to the hospital, alone, if my temperature rose to 38 C (100.4 F). Life has gradually gone back to normal, and even in Wuhan people began cautiously heading out last week.But I keep thinking back to what I saw there, and the stories that emerged after I left. A writer looks back at the early days – and why it’s important to remember those sacrifices. Then I finally headed back to my flat in Beijing, to start another 14-day quarantine: the local government required all returnees to isolate themselves at home. I kept thinking of the overcrowded fever wards where I’d been reporting and what it might mean to be stuck here: no hospital beds, scarce supplies, no friends.I made it out that day: first to quarantine, in a hotel hundreds of miles away; then to my parents’ house; and finally to yet another quarantine at home. As China and the U.S. It might be the biggest news of the year. The smell of disinfectants dominated the air. Scenes flooded back in my mind of doing interviews in Wuhan: those early patients’ symptoms, the risk of cross-infection, and how hopeless and frustrated they were.Can I be cured in this small town, I wondered? People started returning to their offices and hanging out on the weekend just as the rest of the world entered the kind of chaos Wuhan first experienced. When SARS broke out in 2003, she remembered, we asked how much we’d have to sacrifice. Instinct guided me: Yes, I’ll go. Yet life has been pretty bland, and ever since I’ve wondered if my decision to leave Wuhan that early morning was right. Will I be infected in the hospital? A photo went viral, and infuriated many, in which several doctors stood in front of a desk, celebrating the Chinese New Year with only instant noodles as their dinner.It just seemed as though there had been no preparations before the lockdown, I told a friend. A few hours before, I woke up to the news that Wuhan had announced a lockdown from 10 a.m. Intersections are busy again. To restrict strangers, we were all given a pass. I kept thinking of the overcrowded fever wards where I’d been reporting: hundreds of patients packed in the waiting hall, waiting five hours or even longer for consultation, and people with fevers commuting from home to the hospital every day, because of the shortage of beds.It felt out of control, and I’d already planned to leave that morning. The further we got from Wuhan, the less cautious boarding passengers were. Even going to hospitals became a problem for patients and doctors alike, as the city stopped public transportation. “You should wear a gas mask.”   Not a single passenger was in the waiting hall of the station. Visitors, like me, were racing to leave. I’ve never seen my hometown so deserted.Eleven days later, I could leave for my parents’ house. One day later, my temperature fell   – and then again the next.Locking myself in the room, I didn’t speak to anyone. By then the whole town was under lockdown, and all hotels and public spaces closed. Street lights were on, but there was no one on the street – just a few cars passing by. Friends and colleagues kept sending me messages: Can you get out?It was the early days of the coronavirus crisis. have started a blame game, it’s important to remember the sacrifices each individual made. In scramble for supplies, states start banding togetherThe government in Wuhan, the Chinese city of 11 million at the epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak, had announced a lockdown from 10 a.m.“What?” Unable to believe it, I opened up WeChat, a popular messaging app. Loading… The question in my mind has only grown as I see now how many reporters decided to stay, and were able to share powerful stories.Now that China and the U.S. Reporters were already fleeing after the announcement a few hours before.The night before, it had been hard to fall asleep. After a 2 1/2-month lockdown, residents of the city where the coronavirus pandemic began are cautiously going out to the streets again. 28, 2020, shortly after the lockdown began. For many Chinese people, when they think about COVID-19, they will think about the lost lives, but also the freedom of speech. start a blame game, it’s important to remember the sacrifices each individual made. I boarded a bus to the small town where my parents live, and started quarantine: 14 days in a hotel.Time flies fast during quarantine. on January 23, looked at the pop-up message on my phone, and felt my mind go blank. Most importantly, what about my parents? I felt such disappointment that I could not fall asleep for hours. I followed news from Wuhan and my anger reached new heights as I read about the chaos. )

By a contributor

In some ways, January 23 was a normal winter morning in Wuhan: a little humid, sky still dark; the streets were wet, after a shower. In decision-makers’ eyes, it seemed, the fatalities were just numbers.Traditionally, many people watch the government’s gala on New Year’s Eve, but I was in no mood to. He wasn’t wearing one, either. Doctors and nurses were crying as they worked without full protective gear, and saw people die every day. Some 5 million people managed to leave Wuhan before the lockdown, the mayor later estimated. Patients were asking for help online since they couldn’t find space in hospitals. They said the lockdown started at 10   – but they could change it to 7, just like that. But after a nearly 11-week lockdown that stilled the city, Wuhan is gradually going back to normal.

I felt lucky when I got a chance to leave. But thinking on it now, I would feel lucky if I’d chosen to stay.   [Editor’s note: The Monitor is publishing this essay without a byline to protect the writer’s identity.]

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In Israeli war on coronavirus, Arab doctors rush to the front

Diab says she has kept in touch with Ariel Grabois, a   ballroom dance instructor, who was one of the first patients on the ward. And while she says she isn’t particularly interested in politics, it bothers her when she hears some insist that Israel is only a Jewish state. “I believe this is a mission,” she says. “It’s very difficult to find a light in this tunnel. “In the end, they trust me.”As for her Jewish patients, “I always get smiles from them. People should see that we’re all in the same boat and that our contribution is critical,” he says. Even as Arab Israelis have strengthened their parliamentary representation, they repeatedly have been the objects of hostile rhetoric from Israel’s right.Yasmin Diab, who shuttles between her home in an Arab village and long shifts on a coronavirus ward in Haifa, says she doesn’t regret taking on the risky job. )

By Joshua Mitnick
Correspondent
@joshmitnick

Over the past decade, Arab doctors and nurses have become a familiar presence at Israeli hospitals. Netanyahu’s Likud party sponsored billboards that warned Israeli voters against an alternative government that would include or rely on the Joint List, which the prime minister and his allies portrayed as “terrorism supporters.”In an effort to push back on that sentiment, a new television commercial sponsored by Arab health care workers features a montage of portraits of Arab doctors and nurses. “We are on the front line of this war.”Noting that Israel’s fight to save lives would be “fatally compromised” without Arab professionals, a Tel Aviv University think tank’s policy brief urged “an end to exclusionary and racist discourse and statements that call into question Arab loyalty.”Dr. “They think that what I’m doing shouldn’t be taken for granted.”She says she’s always tried to rise above the national differences in Israel, and focus on individuals as humans instead of Arab or Jew. Arab towns are located, on average, nearly twice as far   from hospitals as Jewish towns, according to the Taub Center for Social Policy Studies.Early on in the pandemic, it became apparent that fewer coronavirus tests were being administered among Arabs, and that informational material about COVID-19 wasn’t even available in Arabic. Lately, more individual Israelis have reached out to her on social media to thank her for her work. Partners in destiny, partners in governance,” the commercial concludes. “The virus doesn’t distinguish between Arab and Jew. Yasmin Diab

Dr. Jewish Israeli attitudes may be evolving. “They want to take an active role in the effort,” says Dr. Increasingly, there are calls in Israel to shift budgets from military interests to the public health battle. The stresses of work make it harder to sleep.Still, the internal medicine resident doesn’t regret the decision to volunteer for a job that puts her and her family at risk. Mohammed Khatib, databank   director of the Galilee Society, a center focusing on health policy among Arabs. Israeli coronavirus policy needs to be better fine-tuned to Arab communities and lacks input from Arab public health professionals, he says.Dr. She says she considers the staff – whether Arab or Jew – like a second family. Leading up to the March 2 election, Mr. And there are calls to recognize the Arab Israeli contribution.“This is the first time that Israel is conducting a war and [that] the Arab citizens have been recruited,” says Eran Singer, Arab affairs reporter for Kan, Israel’s public broadcasting company, alluding to the fact that most Arab citizens aren’t obliged to serve in the army. Diab says Israelis have reached out to her on social media to thank her for her work. “People are looking at us differently,” she says. In Israeli war on coronavirus, Arab doctors rush to the front

Why We Wrote This

As societies confront a coronavirus enemy that doesn’t discriminate, there is growing appreciation for leadership and sacrifice. Khamaisi.“It’s true that [Israeli politicians] ignore us … “I hope this isn’t temporary. I hope it’s the beginning and there will be equality between us.”

TEL AVIV, ISRAEL
Yasmin Diab shuttles daily between self-quarantine at her home in the Arab village of Tamra and 24-hour shifts at Rambam Hospital in Haifa – the largest in northern Israel – where she was the first doctor on the coronavirus ward when it opened in March.Because of her work with coronavirus patients, Dr. Maybe dealing with the coronavirus will change that. “It’s about time to acknowledge: Arabs are also partners in the country. But there’s more than a chance that this can make a difference.”Still, for all the progress achieved by Arab medical professionals, Israel’s health services are harder to access for the Arab population. I’ve never felt anyone treat me differently because I’m an Arab.” While not unheard of, she says, that’s a rare phenomenon at the hospital.Dr. She says she considers them all, whether Arab or Jew, like a second family. But the pandemic has shone them in a new light: as essential foot soldiers and field commanders in the country’s struggle against the coronavirus.That comes, ironically, at a fraught political moment. “We are on the front line of this war.”Editor’s note: As a public service,   all our coronavirus coverage   is free. April 16, 2020

Two ways to read the story

Quick Read
Deep Read ( 5 Min. “It’s quite amazing that it happened so soon after the elections.”The prominence of Arabs in Israel’s health system reflects an effort by many to move into the mainstream, despite decades of discrimination and marginalization. In scramble for supplies, states start banding togetherThough Arab doctors, nurses, and pharmacists have over the past decade become a familiar presence at Israeli hospitals and state-supported HMO clinics, the pandemic has shone Arab Israeli citizens in a new light: as essential foot soldiers and field commanders in the country’s struggle against the virus.That elevated stature comes, ironically, at a particularly fraught moment in Arab-Jewish political relations.Even as Arab Israelis, one-fifth of the population, have strengthened their parliamentary representation via a new alliance, the Joint List, they repeatedly have been the objects of hostile campaign rhetoric from Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. Released after recovering from the virus, Mr. Grabois describes the medical staff on the ward as “dedicated” and “top notch,” and says he hopes the   pandemic prompts Israelis to look beyond identity politics.“You have to put those things aside,” he says. The Palestinian Authority reports another 81 cases in East Jerusalem.The underrepresentation stems from the initial emergence of the virus here among Jews who have limited interaction with Arabs,   says   Dr. As of April 16, the Health Ministry reports that only about 459 of Israel’s some 12,591 COVID-19 cases, or 3.6%, come from Arab towns. Loading… “I believe this is a mission,” she says. Diab delivered a round of poised interviews to several Israeli news shows in the early weeks of the crisis. Yasmin Diab (second from right) and some of the other members of the coronavirus team at Rambam Hospital in Haifa, Israel. They aren’t insulted or surprised to have an Arab opposite them. Her parents, religious Muslims, worried about the risk of infection but ultimately supported her decision to volunteer.“They believe that God will do what is necessary,” she says. I hope this will make people look at things differently – less in terms of [demographic] sectors.”“We’re all in the same boat”Indeed, inside Rambam Hospital, the collegiality and collaboration among the Arab and Jewish staff is a marked contrast to the public atmosphere elsewhere in Israel, says Mogher Khamaisi, the hospital’s Arab Israeli director of internal medicine, who oversees a ward of patients with COVID-19 symptoms.Arabs, who make up much of the senior staff, volunteered for the coronavirus work out of a sense of professional duty. and the prime minister speaks against us. Diab cannot have physical contact with her family – her birthday recently came and went without a hug from her parents. But she is just one of the tens of thousands of Arab health care professionals putting themselves on the line in Israel’s battle against COVID-19. On the other hand, the doctors here do our work regardless, without expecting any favors. In Israel, the prominent role of Arab health care professionals is gaining attention, and praise. 

Courtesy of Dr. Diab sounds a more hopeful note. Over the past two decades, as rising numbers of Arab youth have pursued higher education and sought to integrate among Israel’s middle class, many have chosen to become health professionals.According to official government data published in the daily Haaretz newspaper, Arabs make up 17% of   the country’s doctors, 24% of the nurses, and 48% of the pharmacists.“The system would collapse without the decisive contribution of Arab medical staff,” said Raphael Walden, deputy director of Sheba Medical Center, the country’s largest hospital, in an interview with Israel’s Channel 12 television news.Opportunity “not to be missed”The pandemic has broadened recognition of the Arab Israeli health care contribution to national security experts.Noting that the fight to save lives would be “fatally compromised” without Arab professionals, a recent policy brief by the Institute for National Security Studies (INSS), a Tel Aviv University think tank led by former military top brass, urged the government to create a “positive basis” for “full integration” of Arabs in Israeli society and for “an end to exclusionary and racist discourse and statements that call into question Arab loyalty.”“This is really an opportunity that’s not to be missed,” says Meir Elran, an INSS fellow and former general who co-wrote the paper. “But I fear that in another half year, everyone will forget, and we will return to being second- and third-class citizens.”Dr. Diab, who dons bordeaux-colored scrubs worn by the staff on the Rambam coronavirus ward, estimates that about two-thirds of the doctors on the ward are Arab. No paywall.With a stethoscope draped around her neck, Dr.

No paywall. I hope it’s the beginning and there will be equality between us.”Editor’s note: As a public service,   all our coronavirus coverage   is free. “Ultimately we live in the same country, and we all need to be equal,” she says. “The fact is that we are now more equal, because we are on the front lines of the corona battle, and people are looking at us differently. I hope this isn’t temporary.

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How leaders use emergency powers to target journalists, critics

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It affects my family and myself.“But deep down inside, I would have wanted to write it anyway.” Particularly in times of crisis, we need to protect our precious liberties and rights.”Lawmakers in the Philippines last month passed special legislation giving President Rodrigo Duterte emergency powers.Mr. Instead it went viral.He believes the government is afraid its opponents would use his observation as proof it was failing the fight against the coronavirus, and acted against him as a warning to others.As governments across the world enact emergency measures to keep people at home and stave off the pandemic, some are unhappy about having their missteps publicized. Thai Lawyers for Human Rights/AP

Danai Ussama stands inside a police station in Bangkok on March 24, 2020 after being arrested for posting a message on social media criticizing the lack of government measures in screening passengers when arriving at the airport. Human rights advocates say some regimes are exploiting misinformation laws to target journalists and political critics. I was handcuffed and slept overnight in a police station cell. Khunsong
Associated Press

Bangkok
Health concerns were on artist Danai Ussama’s mind when he returned to Thailand last month from a trip to Spain. Others are taking advantage of the crisis to silence critics and tighten control. The group withheld more details to safeguard the girl’s privacy.Hungary’s Prime Minister Viktor Orban may have been the most adroit at exploiting the health crisis.His country’s Parliament granted him the power to rule indefinitely by decree, unencumbered by existing laws or judicial or parliamentary restraints. Loading… I was devastated, actually. He noticed that he and his fellow passengers did not go through medical checks after arriving at Bangkok’s airport, and thought it worth noting on his Facebook page.The airport authorities denied it, lodged a complaint with police, and he was arrested at his gallery in Phuket for violating the Computer Crime Act by allegedly posting false information – an offense punishable by up to five years’ imprisonment and a fine of $3,000.Mr. The new law makes “spreading false information regarding the COVID-19 crisis on social media and other platforms” a criminal offense punishable by up to two months in jail and fines of up to $19,500.At least two reporters have been charged by police with spreading false information about the crisis.“It is feared that Duterte will use his increased authority to quell dissent and further pounce on [his] political enemies,” said Aries Arugay, associate professor of political science at the University of the Philippines.Egypt expelled a correspondent for the British newspaper The Guardian over a report citing a study that challenged the official count of coronavirus cases. “I have never been arrested nor gone to court before. One aspect of the law ostensibly passed to cope with the coronavirus calls for prison terms of up to five years for those convicted of spreading falsehoods or distorted facts during the emergency.“The global health problems caused by COVID-19 require effective measures to protect people’s health and lives,” acknowledged Council of Europe Commissioner for Human Rights Dunja Mijatovic. The clinical center said her article “disturbed the public and hurt the image of the health organization.”The government also closed its daily coronavirus news conferences for journalists, asking them to send their questions by email. This is a counterproductive approach that must stop. Iraq suspended the operations of the Reuters news agency for three months and imposed a fine of about $20,800 for reporting that the actual number of infections and deaths was vastly more than the government acknowledged. April 16, 2020

By Grant Peck and Preeyapa T. In scramble for supplies, states start banding together“COVID-19 poses significant threats to government and regime security as it has the potential to expose poor governance and lack of transparency on issues that affect every citizen in a given country,” said Aim Sinpeng, an assistant professor of political science at the University of Sydney.“As the pandemic is a global issue and is constantly on the news around the world, governments have a harder time controlling messages to the public without exposing how little/how much they do in comparison to other countries around the world,” she said in an email interview.In Cambodia, where Prime Minister Hun Sen has been in power for 35 years, human rights group LICADHO has documented 24 cases of people being detained for sharing information about the coronavirus.They include four supporters of the dissolved opposition Cambodia National Rescue Party.Human Rights Watch also reported the arrest and questioning of a 14-year-old who expressed fears on social media about rumors of positive COVID-19 cases at her school and in her province. Reuters stood by its story.In Serbia, police briefly detained journalist Ana Lalic, who wrote about a lack of protective equipment and “chaotic” conditions at a large hospital complex. How leaders use emergency powers to target journalists, critics

From Hungary to Thailand, new emergency powers are helping leaders keep a tight lid on public dissent during the pandemic. “This includes combating disinformation that may cause panic and social unrest.”But she said, “regrettably some governments are using this imperative as a pretext to introduce disproportionate restrictions to press freedom. It said it’s meant to stop the spread of the virus but rights groups and independent media decried it as a form of censorship.A state of emergency invoked in late March gives Thailand’s Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha extraordinary powers to fight COVID-19, including censoring the media.More than a dozen people in Thailand are reported to have been arrested on charges related to spreading coronavirus misinformation.Thailand’s top public health experts deserve credit for their sincere efforts to counter misinformation, said Joel Selway, an associate professor of political science at Brigham Young University, who has published a book on politics and health policy in developing countries.“This doesn’t mean that the Prayuth-led government would not also take advantage of this to crush political opponents,” he added.Artist Danai, who said he will contest the charge against him, admits to regrets over writing his Facebook post about his airport arrival.“If I had known that I would be in so much trouble like this, I wouldn’t have written it.” he said. Danai told The Associated Press that his Facebook post, though public, was really meant just for a small circle of 40 to 50 people. Duterte, already criticized for a brutal war on drugs that has left thousands dead, has been fiercely belligerent toward critics.
This story was reported by The Associated Press. It’s free. AP correspondents Pablo Gorondi in Budapest, Hungary; Dusan Stojanovic in Belgrade, Serbia; Sopheng Cheang in Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Busaba Sivasomboon in Bangkok, and Jim Gomez in Manila, Philippines, contributed to this report.Editor’s note: As a public service, the Monitor has removed the paywall for all our coronavirus coverage.

Coronavirus lockdown stirs can-do spirit in France’s poor suburbs

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“People who live in the banlieues are normal. No paywall. “There are some fantastic people that live here and there are really great things taking place.”Editor’s note: As a public service,   all our coronavirus coverage   is free. We have jobs. We’re not all druggies or throwing rocks at the cops,” says Piroo, from his home in Sartrouville.

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“Often times, people are united by shared hardship, poverty, and shortages. “We needed to do something concrete for them.” So he organized numerous local businesses – as well as neighbors stuck at home – to collect and donate food and prepared meals to local hospitals.Such banlieue-based nonprofits demonstrate a unique solidarity that is guiding local communities out of their darkest days. But the ensuing lockdown has magnified the inequalities for their inhabitants.Many continue to take public transportation to get to work, raising health risks, or find themselves confined to tiny apartments with numerous people. In early April, several videos circulated online of young people being thrown to the ground by groups of police after they were asked for the official form that French people must carry when venturing outside during the lockdown.“The populations that are struggling the most are the ones who are the least protected,” says Marie-Hélène Bacqué, a professor of urban studies at the University of Paris-Nanterre. If anything, it has made the push for volunteerism even stronger, such that the country has seen a big enough spike in volunteerism that many nonprofits are having to turn people away.In addition to Piroo’s Sartrouville initiatives, a host of nonprofits are reorienting their activities to help some of the most vulnerable populations, who are even more isolated during the confinement period.Emergence 93, which normally works to reintegrate former juvenile prisoners back into the community, has helped its youth organize a campaign to get donations for Seine-Saint-Denis’ homeless population. Living in close proximity to one another, often fighting the same fights, translates to a natural desire to reach out to one another.“There is a form of solidarity that already exists here, people very easily organize volunteer missions,” says Ms. But they are also showing a communal, volunteer spirit that is helping them through the crisis. )

By Colette Davidson
Correspondent
@kolet_ink

Life was not easy in France’s poorest suburbs, or banlieues, before the coronavirus pandemic. This creates solidarity between people and the desire to help one another.”Banlieue-bashingEven if France has made strides in recent years to improve misconceptions around banlieues, their negative reputation has been hard to shake. “Often times, people are united by shared hardship, poverty, and shortages.”

Paris
France’s poorest suburbs, or banlieues, have long struggled with notoriety as places where drug dealing, delinquency, and unemployment abound. In homes where internet connections are shoddy or parents are uneducated, home schooling is next to impossible. “In studies I’ve conducted, when people are asked what characterizes their neighborhood, they say ‘diversity and solidarity.’”Many groups in Paris’   banlieues have worked to change the negative image of their hometowns through community action – and they haven’t stopped their activities simply because of the coronavirus lockdown. “I realized that [the nightly tradition of] clapping for health care staff wasn’t enough,” he says. Through his efforts, numerous local businesses – as well as neighbors stuck at home – have donated food and prepared meals for local hospitals. “Faced with this epidemic, I realized that [the nightly tradition of] clapping for health care staff wasn’t enough,” says Piroo, who uses an assumed name in his charity work to protect his privacy. Local media reports continue to portray banlieues as hotspots for incivility and the propagation of the coronavirus.It speaks to a discrimination felt twice over by those living with limited means, where many must continue working menial jobs during confinement or already lack adequate housing and resources.It’s also shortsighted, for the banlieues are where those like Piroo, a 20-something resident of the Paris suburb of Sartrouville, are making a difference. Now, amid the country’s lockdown to contain the coronavirus pandemic, that reputation has only gotten worse. Loading… Seine-Saint-Denis, the poorest department in the Paris region, has one of the highest death rates due to the virus, counting more than 500 as of early April and a 63% jump in mortalities during the last half of March.“Being confined in the banlieue is different from anywhere else: no backyard, no balcony,” says Madeleine, a young woman from Saint Denis who told her story to Métropop. “They’re the ones who must continue working – as cleaners, delivery people, or supermarket cashiers. And nonprofit Frères d’Espoir, a brother-sister team that operates out of Limeil Brévannes southeast of Paris, has continued its volunteer actions of handing out food, clothing, and hygiene kits to homeless people across Paris. No paywall. They’re fundamental in ensuring that our daily lives continue and yet they’re the least protected in terms of public health.”“Diversity and solidarity”The shared discrimination and lack of resources that many in Paris’s banlieues face has acted as the glue that unites communities together. Bacqué. Everyday I turn in circles, looking for something to occupy my time.”Others recount a constant police presence and undue violence toward its youth population. Local media reports continue to portray banlieues as hotspots for incivility and infection.But the banlieues are also where those like Piroo, a resident of the Paris suburb of Sartrouville, are making a difference. In homes where internet connections are shoddy or parents are uneducated, home schooling is next to impossible.Medical deserts – communities suffering from a lack of health care professionals – are also deteriorating as the pandemic continues. April 15, 2020

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Deep Read ( 4 Min. They also intend to show that a unique solidarity exists there that is guiding local communities out of their darkest days and setting an example for the rest of the country.“The volunteer sector is very strong in many working-class neighborhoods,” says Sylvie Tissot, a sociologist and professor of political science at the University of Paris 8, whose research focuses on public housing and gentrification. The overnight emergency room staff at the Hospital Center d’Argenteuil, in the suburbs northwest of Paris, hold signs thanking nonprofit Les Grands Frères & Soeurs De Sartrouville for its donation of food. Coronavirus lockdown stirs can-do spirit in France’s poor suburbs

Why We Wrote This

France’s pandemic lockdown is hitting its suburbs hard, compounding their economic and crime woes. “We needed to do something concrete for them.”So via his local organization, Les Grands Frères & Soeurs De Sartrouville, he organized Sartrouville residents to donate time, food, and acts of goodwill to help those in need, particularly the country’s overtaxed health professionals. In scramble for supplies, states start banding togetherAs France’s lockdown continues into its fourth week, banlieue-based nonprofits are working to highlight the inequalities experienced by those living in the country’s poorest neighborhoods and reverse the negative image surrounding them. Since France’s lockdown began, people from impoverished communities have been photographed congregating outside in groups, having run-ins with police, or robbing shuttered stores.Métropop, a nonprofit that aims to stop “banlieue-bashing,” says France’s working class are neither irresponsible nor blind to the risks of the coronavirus, and that France’s suburbs have suffered stigma for 40 years.“There has been a media portrayal pointing the finger at people from certain working-class neighborhoods, that they’re not respecting the lockdown, even if we can see the same behaviors in other well-to-do areas,” says Virginie Lions, director of a community involvement branch of Métropop.In addition, these same communities face double discrimination. Not only must they battle their negative representation, but they are the populations making the most personal sacrifices during the lockdown. While hordes of wealthy French set off for the countryside ahead of the lockdown or are comfortably working from home, the confinement has magnified the inequalities for those less fortunate.Many continue to take public transportation to get to work, raising health risks, or find themselves confined to tiny apartments with numerous people. “The volunteer sector is very strong in many working-class neighborhoods,” says Sylvie Tissot, a sociologist and professor of political science at the University of Paris 8. “When I open my window, all I see is other buildings. Courtesy of Les Grands Frères&Soeurs De Sartrouville. And jumping off from a neighborhood cleanup program he was involved with last summer, he launched the #CleanTonHall initiative, calling on young people living in public housing to clean their buildings, in order to take the pressure off cleaning staff.Editor’s note: As a public service,   all our coronavirus coverage   is free.

From healing hearts to stealing hearts: Jordan’s ‘Dr. Fauci’

No paywall. “If the minister cannot cure coronavrius,” asks one fan on Facebook, “can he cure my longing heart?”Editor’s note: As a public service,   all our coronavirus coverage   is free.

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But Dr. “Saad Jaber!”

AMMAN, Jordan
Each day, Jordanians under coronavirus lockdown turn to one man to get the facts – and swoon.While Americans have Anthony Fauci, Jordanians have a “nation’s doctor” of their own: Health Minister Saad Jaber.While Dr. Each night at 8 p.m. Jaber, almost always with floating cartoon hearts, heart-eyed smileys, and lines of poetry professing their – and a nation’s – love.“There is a medical emergency: Your handsomeness is killing me!” writes one.Then there are the songs. Jaber chafed at his ministerial post, preferring to be in the field, and one day back in the operating room, saving lives.But his sudden celebrity status has had a real impact: His nightly briefings have become must-watch TV in Jordan.Jaber fans discuss how the virus spreads, the proper way to wear a face mask and stay 2 meters apart, how young people can get sick or carry coronavirus or be asymptomatic. sharp, Dr. Jaber has broken the mold.In a time of COVID-19 confusion and fear that has tasked Jordan’s military with patrolling the streets, his calm demeanor, fact-based briefings, and casual language have transformed the conversation in a panicked nation to a relaxed chat with a concerned uncle or a warm neighbor passing on sage advice.But perhaps what is most refreshing is his honesty.He admits he doesn’t have all the answers – and won’t pretend that he does. Mothers, grandmothers, professional women, and young girls across the country say they “melt” at his calm demeanor and smooth talk of social distancing and hand washing. Often. Nor are men immune to his charms.In WhatsApp groups and on Facebook, Jordanians share their latest music videos and memes of Dr. Jordanians have posted Bedouin love ballads reworded for Dr. No paywall. Jaber, and even written songs and poems of their own.“There is something hidden and dangerous, who will help us endure?” sings one Jordanian woman. Authoritative yet kind? April 15, 2020

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Deep Read ( 3 Min. Jaber stands in front of TV cameras, his wavy graying hair coiffed to one side, and in the soothing velvety voice of a jazz DJ updates the nation on the latest coronavirus cases and government steps.Editor’s note: As a public service,   all our coronavirus coverage   is free. Jaber has earned a legion of fangirls. He has become the face of the government’s response – a face many find pleasing.Each night at 8 p.m. “Saad Jaber!”Jordan’s composer laureate, Omar Al-Abdallat, known for his chest-thumping nationalist songs about the king, army, and tribes, produced a toe-tapping ode to Dr. )

By Taylor Luck
Correspondent

Jordan has had early success containing the coronavirus, using a near-total shutdown that is more than flattening the curve. Jaber reminds interviewers, “but I know we can defeat this pandemic together.”When hundreds of citizens violated the national curfew on the first day, he was direct, rather than angry: “Breaking the curfew won’t look so manly when your son gets sick and there is no hospital bed for him, or your mother has to lie in a hospital corridor like we see in the West.”Pre-COVID, Dr. There has been a total of 350 cases, 150 recoveries, and seven deaths in a tiny kingdom where 90% of residents live on 5% of the land and every greeting comes with a kiss.Dr. His visits to hospitals with patients and health care workers are viral sensations. Jaber has overseen Jordan’s early success in containing COVID-19, pushing for a near-total shutdown that is more than flattening the curve – it’s squashing it.Jordan has seen a peak of 40 cases per day drop to zero to eight new daily cases. In scramble for supplies, states start banding togetherUsing his gentle bedside manner, he kindly urges his fellow “brothers and sisters” and “my loves” to follow guidelines, telling them: “We can do this together.” Perhaps most shocking to Jordanians accustomed to stony-faced officials: He smiles. Jaber’s rock-star status is even more remarkable that it comes in Jordan, where citizens have low views of officials whose attempts to reach out to the public are seen as cringe-worthy or condescending.Here government officials are tolerated, not beloved. From healing hearts to stealing hearts: Jordan’s ‘Dr. Someone who is gently reassuring? In WhatsApp groups and on Facebook, his legions of fans share their latest music videos and memes of Dr. He is savvy at social media.Within the first few days of lockdown, a new epidemic emerged in Jordan: Jaber-mania.Even journalists and columnists routinely refer to him as “the handsome doctor,” and “Jordan’s George Clooney.” Others comb through his career in the army medical corps and in the operating theater for awe-inducing stories of inspiration.But “Minister Clooney” is not winning over Jordan with a friendly smile and facts alone; Dr. In a soothing velvety voice, he updates the nation on the latest coronavirus measures, urges people to follow guidelines, and says: “We can do this together.”America’s Anthony Fauci may be on bumper stickers and bobbleheads, but Dr. Jaber is the subject of love ballads, poetry, and portraits. sharp, Dr. Jaber from self-isolation.Dr. Loading… Fauci’

Why We Wrote This

In the midst of a pandemic, what qualities do you want in a government health messenger? Muhammad Hamed/Reuters

Jordanian Health Minister Saad Jaber (right) and Minister for Media Affairs Amjad al-Adaileh attend a joint news conference at the headquarters of the prime minister in Amman, Jordan, March 10, 2020. He even apologized on national TV for saying that the shemagh, the checkered Arab headscarf, could help protect against the virus if worn like a bandana.“I don’t know and nobody knows how long this virus will last,” Dr. Jaber stands in front of TV cameras, his wavy graying hair coiffed to one side. “There is something hidden and dangerous, who will help us endure?” sings one woman. How about rock-star handsome, too? Jaber, almost always with floating cartoon hearts and lines of poetry professing their – and a nation’s – love.Then there are the songs. But within the first few days of the lockdown, a new epidemic emerged: Jaber-mania.Heart surgeon Saad Jaber was thrust onto Jordan’s national stage by the COVID-19 crisis less than 10 months into his tenure as health minister. He dons leather jackets, jeans, and polos more often than a suit. Fauci is on bumper stickers and bobbleheads, this Jordanian physician is the subject of love ballads, poetry, and portraits.Thrust onto the national stage amid the COVID-19 crisis less than 10 months into his tenure, the heart surgeon-turned-minister has become the face of the government’s response – a face many have found pleasing.

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She was forced to marry a warlord. Now, she’s helping survivors heal.

“But I hope my daughter will one day return back home.” She was happy for them, but another thought pressed down on her, heavy and aching.“My plan is to continue helping as many returnees as I can,” she says. Amony watched from afar. On the evening of the reunion, as locals continued to ululate and dance to a convulsive local beat called lakubukubu, Ms.
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They called it Rwot Lakica (God is Merciful).As membership grew, and the women grew close, they began to speak to each other about the traumas they had endured at the hands of the LRA. And Ms. From there, Ms. But one day, he called her to his house alongside his two dozen wives, and announced Ms. Amony leads the Women’s Advocacy Network, which supports survivors of conflict in Uganda. Kony. So it simply began to kidnap them.Children were an easy target. They’ve helped each other find economic security, too, with job training and livestock purchasing programs.One family at a timeBut their work, at times, has seemed endless.The two-decade LRA insurgency had led to the deaths of 12,000 people in northern Uganda and uprooted 1.5 million people. Amony and a group of women she’d met at the peace talks and in Gulu decided to form a small organization to help each other save money. Atanga, Uganda
The crowd ululated and cheered as Santa Aber and her daughter stepped out of the dust-streaked car. The group began quiet negotiations on her behalf, and two months later, she was here.It was an unusual homecoming – to a place she had never before lived. Now, she’s helping survivors heal. “He said, ‘You have no choice.’”Eight years later, Ms. Joseph Kony’s rebel group waged war in Uganda for two decades and abducted 30,000 children along the way.At first, she was treated as a house servant for Mr. Boys became soldiers. Amony had also adopted two of Mr. April 15, 2020

Two ways to read the story

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Deep Read ( 5 Min. Amony was 14 and working as a house servant for the LRA’s leader, Joseph Kony, when he called her to his house alongside his two dozen wives.From this day forward, he announced, Ms. They ask the abductee to tell them anything she can remember about her child’s father: family name, clan name, village, lineage, and family stories. This group helps survivors reconnect. Loading… Amony and her three children were in an LRA camp in what is now South Sudan when the Ugandan military attacked. Amony was a preteen, she was kidnapped by LRA rebels while walking home from school near Gulu, northern Uganda’s main city.By that time, the LRA had been fighting a brutal guerrilla war in northern Uganda for seven years. When she was released, she went immediately back to her home village, only to find her family had disowned her.“They would often say, ‘Kony’s children are still alive but our children are all buried,’” she says. They agreed that Ms. But they continue to face rejection, particularly children fathered by LRA rebels and their mothers.Ms. Amony would marry him, too.“I asked him, ‘How can I be your wife when up until this point you have called me your child?’” she recalls. In scramble for supplies, states start banding together“I have a home now,” she said, her eyes filling with tears.WAN founder Evelyn Amony, who had brokered the reunion, watched the scene with a biting mix of joy and anguish. “I have searched for her ever since.”The Ugandan military took her into custody for eight months. Erin Baines/Women’s Advocacy Network

Evelyn Amony (right) and her colleagues look over Lake Victoria in Entebbe, Uganda. She was forced to marry a warlord. Kony’s other children, whom she met while in Ugandan custody.)Healing togetherSo she left for Gulu, where she enrolled in a government-sponsored tailoring course at a local Roman Catholic school. She escaped in 2005, with a daughter she’d had with an LRA commander she was forced to marry.But she couldn’t go home. For many, there was a deep relief in breaking the shameful silence around their experiences of abduction, rape, and captivity.Soon, the group began helping survivors tell their stories more publicly – at community gatherings, on radio talk shows, and in a book they published about women’s experiences under the LRA.Renaming itself the Women’s Advocacy Network, the organization also formed small groups in villages across the region, where women can talk about the challenges of coming home, from stigma to poverty to the pain of searching for lost loved ones. Her own family wouldn’t accept her back, she knew, but perhaps the family of her daughter’s father would. But that last one’s tough when few people understand what you’ve experienced – and others reject you for it. The LRA abducted thousands of children during two decades of conflict. Why We Wrote This

Rebuilding your life means searching for safety, stability, and belonging. Soon after, in 2006, she was chosen to represent former abductees at a series of peace talks between the LRA and the Ugandan government.The experience was a revelation: She was not alone – or powerless.Ms. Aber’s child’s father came from a village called Atanga. Then they use their own network of informants – WAN’s more than 900 members across northern Uganda – to find the family.It didn’t take long to establish that Ms. In the chaos, she grabbed for her children, but only found two sets of little hands.“I watched my [other] child slip through my fingers,” says Ms. Amony – who first met Ms. Aber was abducted from a nearby village by the Lord’s Resistance Army, a rebel group that waged a violent civil war in this part of Uganda from the late 1980s until the mid-2000s. )

By John Okot
Contributor

Evelyn Amony was only a preteen, walking home from school, when she was kidnapped by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Ms. Many of the women forced into marriage by the LRA have faced similar heartbreak, and poverty, as they try to rebuild their lives. “He said, ‘You have no choice.’”Eight years later, she was finally freed, along with her children, only to find her family had disowned her. Amony brokered a meeting with local leaders, and eventually with the man’s family.Yes, the family said, their son had been abducted too, and yes, he had died while serving as an LRA commander. Aber felt relief. Aber’s father, for example, said he could not welcome her back into their home because “you had [a] child with the devil.”In cases like this one, Ms. Amony and other survivors decided to do something about it.Today, their organization, the Women’s Advocacy Network, helps reunite returnees with their families – often in-laws, if women’s parents won’t accept them. This was the 54th time her organization had reunited an LRA abductee with her family, bringing an end to years of wandering and suffering.And each of those 54 times, she wondered when her own turn would come. By 2009, the LRA had been driven out of Uganda, and its hostages have slowly trickled back to their homes. And so, for the next 15 years, she lived alone in a run-down hut, washing clothes for local families.Then, last year, she heard about a group called the Women’s Advocacy Network (WAN), which helps reunite LRA abductees with their families. Amony would be his wife, too.“I asked him, ‘How can I be your wife when up until this point you have called me your child?’” she recalls. According to the United Nations refugee agency, the LRA abducted at least 30,000 children between 1987 and 2006. Nearly all the residents of this small village in northern Uganda had come out to welcome the women to their new home.Two decades ago, at the age of 14, Ms. (Ms. They help each other find job training, raise money, and seek comfort, as they share experiences few others can understand. Her family refused to take her back, as is true for many children abducted by the LRA. From child to wifeIn 1994, when Ms. Aber when they were both being held by the LRA – and her team act as detectives. Girls fought too, and many also became “wives” to the army’s commanders.Ms. John Okot

Evelyn Amony (in red) poses with community members in Atanga, a village in Uganda where she recently brokered a reunion between a woman abducted by the Lord’s Resistance Army in the 1990s and her in-laws. Amony. But as she stepped into Atanga that day in February, Ms. Its goal was to overthrow the country’s national government, which had subjected the country’s north to decades of neglect and abuse, and establish a theocracy.But the LRA struggled to find recruits. Aber and her daughter were their family too, and promised to take them in. She wasn’t alone.

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Coronavirus tests global sense of who wins: ‘me’ or ‘us’

The issue was finessed by a $550 billion package of EU support payments. The COVID-19 crisis has seen “me” triumph over “us” elsewhere as well. April 15, 2020

Two ways to read the story

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Deep Read ( 4 Min. But the coronabond issue remains on the table, to be considered by the heads of government against the background of a warning from Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte that it represented a “challenge to the existence” of the EU.Beyond EuropeThe COVID-19 crisis has seen “me” triumph over “us” elsewhere in the world as well.Not only have borders been closed and transport links severed. This week, he announced plans for the U.S., the principal donor to the World Health Organization, to suspend its funding.There does seem to be a growing recognition among other G-7 members – the major European states, Canada, and Japan – of the potentially enormous threat the pandemic still poses to less developed nations and refugee populations. And while it managed to stave off the danger for now, its crisis has dramatically highlighted a key challenge from COVID-19 for national governments around the world.It is forcing them to make an age-old human choice: between “me” and “us.”For individuals, that means balancing personal needs with those of other people in the communities, societies, countries, and world of which we’re all a part. Britain, for instance, has announced additional funding for international relief organizations and for WHO.Still, the main me-versus-us test may lie ahead, as countries decide whether, or to what degree, to reengage internationally as they cope with the inevitable challenge of rebuilding their domestic economies.Both politically and economically, there have been signs that one issue above all may determine which way they move: relations with China.Economically, the scramble for equipment to deal with COVID-19 has underscored the degree to which China has become an indispensable part of the global supply chain, not just for consumer products or manufacturing components but countless other products – including critical ventilators and protective equipment.Politically, that’s become part of China’s own strategy to burnish its image and maximize its influence as the pandemic spreads more widely. Coronavirus tests global sense of who wins: ‘me’ or ‘us’

Why We Wrote This

Responses to the pandemic point to a key challenge that lies ahead: whether the increasingly fragile architecture of political alliances, trade partnerships, and the global economic system will be built back to anything like its former self. 

Mindaugas Kulbis/AP

Truckers endure a 36-mile backup in Lithuania to enter Poland on March 20, 2020. For governments, not just in Europe but elsewhere, the spread of COVID-19 has meant choosing between their national interests and a broader international engagement to confront a virus that holds no passport and recognizes no borders.So far at least, nationalism – “me” – is winning.Editor’s note: As a public service,   all our coronavirus coverage   is free. Loading… A number of states tightened or closed their borders. )

By Ned Temko
Correspondent

It’s an age-old choice: between “me” and “us.” And so far on the global stage, nationalism – “me” – is winning.The European Union’s COVID-19 reckoning is especially telling, because the EU should have been singularly well placed to mount a transnational response. One issue may determine how they move forward: relations with China. Countries have competed for supplies and restricted related exports, while efforts to coordinate an international response have foundered. With pressure to ensure adequate supplies of equipment, some EU states also briefly banned exports to the worst-hit areas in Italy or Spain.Some of this was simply a gut public-health reaction to the sudden spread of the virus. Just as within the EU, countries large and small have been scouring worldwide for supplies of ventilators and other items while seeking to restrict the export of such equipment available domestically.So far at least, efforts to coordinate a concerted international response have foundered.A recent conference-call meeting of the Group of Seven, the world’s leading economies, failed even to issue a joint statement, due to objections over a U.S. It essentially pits Germany and other wealthy, fiscally conservative states in northern Europe against more heavily indebted countries of the south.The aftermath is going to require similarly huge government expenditure, and ultimately borrowing. The official phrase is “ever-closer union,” implying a kind of United States of Europe.COVID-19 has put that vision to an unprecedented test.The immediate response in February and early March as the pandemic struck with particular force in three member states – Italy, Spain, and France – was hardly an example of ever-closer union. But the real fault line inside the EU – and the cause of last week’s crisis – involves what might be called the second pandemic: the huge economic cost of the shutdowns being used to stem the spread of COVID-19. The issue was finally finessed by a $550 billion package of EU support payments. Northern states demurred. London
This past week, the 27-nation European Union came close to a breaking point. In scramble for supplies, states start banding togetherAnd one major question, when the crisis has finally passed, will be whether the increasingly fragile architecture of existing international relationships – political alliances, trade partnerships, and the global economic system as a whole – can or will be built back to anything like its former self. The main test may lie ahead, as countries decide how to reengage internationally as they rebuild their economies. Since two of the countries most severely hit, Italy and Spain, are already heavily indebted, the argument they’ve been making is for the EU truly to act like a union: to use the northern states’ more solid credit rating as ballast, and to borrow as a single bloc to rebuild as a single bloc, by issuing so called EU coronabonds.But Germany, Austria, The Netherlands, Finland, and other northern states wanted no part of an arrangement linking their finances to what they view as a fiscally imprudent south. President Donald Trump has also retreated from past administrations’ leadership role in containing international health crises, disregarding calls for the creation of an international task force. Traffic clogged borders as countries in Europe and beyond imposed strict entry controls in response to the novel coronavirus. Last week strained the EU to the breaking point as Italy and Spain argued for borrowing as a single bloc, taking advantage of northern states’ more solid credit rating, and rebuilding as a single bloc. insistence that it include a reference to COVID-19 as the “Wuhan virus.” U.S. When the pandemic struck Italy, Spain, and France hard, however, several member states tightened or closed borders. In recent weeks, it has made high-profile deliveries to a number of areas in need of supplies, including Italy, Canada, Britain, and New York state in the U.S. That’s likely to take on even greater importance with recent signs that China, the initial source of the coronavirus, does have a coherent and assertive international strategy for a post-pandemic world.The EU’s COVID-19 reckoning is especially telling, because the EU should have been singularly well placed to mount a transnational response when the pandemic started hitting member states early this year.The EU began life as a trading partnership. Some briefly banned exports to the worst-hit areas.Then there’s the huge economic cost of all the shutdowns. Yet in recent decades, it has become a fully fledged single market, with a shared passport, a shared currency, and an explicitly stated aim of achieving a similar level of political integration. No paywall.

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At the same time, it has been reframing the narrative around COVID-19 – a virus whose existence it at first hid from view, and whose origins and extent it has so far chosen not to share in full detail. Instead, Beijing is now trumpeting its success in containing the spread within China, in clear contrast to the response of badly stretched health systems in Western democracies like the U.S. and a number of EU member states.Editor’s note: As a public service,   all our coronavirus coverage   is free. No paywall.

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South Korea: How to run an election during a pandemic

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It’s free. This story was reported by The Associated Press.Editor’s note: As a public service, the Monitor has removed the paywall for all our coronavirus coverage.
Both registered satellite parties in a bid to win more proportional representative seats.Just three years ago, mass protests ousted Mr. Candidates, wearing masks and gloves, avoided large rallies and handshakes. Loading… to avoid crowds.”I was worried about the coronavirus,” she said. so they could cast their ballots after 6 p.m., when polling stations close for other voters.They were to be escorted or monitored through tracking apps and must maintain a 6-foot distance at polling places, while workers fully dressed in protective suits were to disinfect booths after each of them votes.Hospitalized patients or those who were then under two-week quarantine were able to vote by mail if they had applied in late March. to 7 p.m. South Korea: How to run an election during a pandemic

South Korea’s unexpected high voter turnout in parliamentary elections show how the November elections in the United States could be handled. The country has imposed sanitary safeguards, distancing, and temperature taking at the polls. … “When turnouts are high, voters are usually trying to lay down judgment on a government that disappoints them. Those without fever or respiratory symptoms were given permission to leave their homes from 5:20 p.m. Moon and his conservative opponents, who accuse the government of economic and foreign policy failures and botching the financial response to the epidemic.Before the virus began absorbing public attention, Mr. In scramble for supplies, states start banding togetherIn an initial count, the National Election Commission said more than 17.2 million people voted Wednesday. Around 400 of the mildly ill voted at temporary shelters during last week’s early voting.South Korea has confirmed more than 10,590 coronavirus cases, including 225 deaths, with the number of new infections decreasing in recent weeks. Some simply gave up.“Sorry, I really don’t have any theory for this,” said Yul Shin, a professor at Seoul’s Myongji University. Moon’s ruling Democratic Party and the main conservative opposition United Future Party. But there’s concern about rising cases in the densely populated Seoul metropolitan area, and worries that crowds at parks and on mass transportation may be a sign of a relaxing of social distancing.The National Assembly is elected every four years. Voters who passed the fever screening got sanitizing gel and disposable plastic gloves before entering booths.The government also mapped out a voting process for those quarantined in their homes, a number that ballooned after the country began enforcing two-week quarantines on all arrivals from overseas on April 1.Officials texted eligible voters in self-quarantine before the vote and about 13,000 affirmed they wanted to participate. Voters directly elect 253 district seats, while the remaining 47 go to proportional representatives.While dozens of parties registered candidates, the elections were seen largely as a two-way race between Mr. “They checked my temperature and handed me gloves, but it wasn’t as bothersome as I thought it would be. I don’t like what we are going through, but I cast my ballot to prevent the wrong candidates from getting elected.”The voting draws a contrast with an upended election cycle in the United States, where some states have pushed back presidential primaries or switched to voting by mail.To hold the parliamentary elections as scheduled, South Korean officials and health authorities drew up a deliberate set of preventive measures to reduce risks of the virus being transmitted.Duct tape or stickers marked 3 feet of social distancing space from nearby streets to ballot booths. Long lines outside polling stations and record-high participation in early voting defied expectations of low turnout to minimize social contact. But the exit polls predict a crushing win for the ruling party.””We are going through difficult times, but the coronavirus and politics are two different things,” said one voter, Lee Kum.Another Seoul resident, Chung Eun-young, said she arrived at her polling station just after 6 a.m. Moon’s corrupt predecessor, but public displays of South Korea’s dynamic democracy were muted this year by the virus. April 15, 2020

By Kim Tong-Hyung
Associated Press

Seoul, South Korea
Millions of South Koreans wore masks and disposable gloves as they voted in parliamentary elections Wednesday, the highest turnout in nearly three decades despite the coronavirus.The government resisted calls to postpone the parliamentary elections billed as a midterm referendum on President Moon Jae-in, who enters the final two years of his single five-year term grappling with a historic public health crisis that is unleashing massive economic shock.Exit polls conducted by TV stations indicated that Mr. Moon’s Democratic Party and a satellite party it created to win proportional representative seats would comfortably combine for a majority in the 300-seat National Assembly.While South Korea’s electorate is deeply divided along ideological and generational lines and regional loyalties, recent surveys showed growing support for Mr. Moon and his liberal party, reflecting the public’s approval of an aggressive test-and-quarantine program so far credited for lower fatality rates for the coronavirus compared to China, Europe, and North America.The long lines that snaked around public offices and schools followed record-high participation in early voting held on Friday and Saturday, and defied expectations of a low turnout because of fears of contracting the virus. Moon to drive his key domestic and foreign policies, including resuming inter-Korean cooperation and inducing U.S.-North Korea talks, said Duyeon Kim, a senior adviser at the Brussels-based International Crisis Group. Moon saw his support falter over a decaying job market, corruption scandals surrounding key political allies, and an ambitious but fragile diplomacy with rival North Korea that’s falling apart.Mr. Things were more heated on the internet, which overflowed with bitter exchanges between supporters of Mr. Moon held three summits with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in 2018, but the North in recent months severed virtually all cooperation with the South amid a stalemate in larger nuclear negotiations with the United States. Ahn Young-joon/AP

A man casts his vote for the parliamentary election at a polling station in Seoul, South Korea, April 15, 2020. Masked poll workers checked temperatures of arrivals and whisked anyone with a fever or not wearing a mask to separate areas to vote, sanitizing the facilities after they voted. Combined with the 11.8 million who cast their ballots during early voting or by mail, the overall turnout was 66.2%, the highest since 71.9% turnout in a 1992 general election.Analysts struggled to find explanations for the unexpectedly high turnout. The North has also been dialing up weapons tests and fired a barrage of missiles into the sea on Tuesday.A ruling party victory will likely embolden Mr.

How state and global governments are cooperating to beat virus

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The figures understate the true size of the pandemic, because of limited testing, uneven counting of the dead, and concealment by some governments. Chancellor Sebastian Kurz said the government is monitoring new infections closely, and “if the figures develop in the wrong direction, we will, of course, pull the emergency brake.”In Britain, which started its lockdown later than the rest of Europe, new infections and deaths were still rising. Two of the world’s biggest drug companies – Sanofi Pasteur and GSK – announced they will combine forces to work on a vaccine. The border has been sealed and medical units have rushed to the area to prevent travelers from returning with the virus. Sebastian Johnston, a professor of respiratory medicine at Imperial College London.Even in New York – where reported coronavirus deaths passed 10,000 on Monday – Gov. And last week, Apple and Google announced a joint effort to help public health agencies worldwide use Bluetooth wireless technology to trace the contacts of infected people.In China, where new reported cases have dwindled, life is ruled by a green bar-code symbol on a smartphone screen that says a user is symptom-free and can board a subway, check into a hotel, or just enter Wuhan, the city of 11 million where the outbreak began in December.South Korea and Israel have both aggressively used smartphone data to track the movements of carriers. April 14, 2020

By Lori Hinnant, Frank Jordans, and Chris Blake
Associated Press

Berlin
Governments battling a virus that has crossed borders with breathtaking speed pinned their hopes Tuesday on tests, technology, and a coordinated approach to ease the tight restrictions on movement that have slowed the outbreak but strangled the global economy.While the European Union looked into creating a COVID-19 smartphone app that could function across the bloc, governors on both United States’ coasts pledged   to work together as they planned an easing of the confinement of millions. Phil Murphy said. Vincent Thian/AP

Health workers enter Menara City in full protective gear in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, on April 14, 2020. Gavin Newsom said he would announce a detailed plan Tuesday for lifting virus restrictions, using “science to guide our decision-making and not political pressure.””The house is still on fire,” New Jersey Gov. But epidemiologists say contact tracing must be combined with widely available testing, which has been lacking in places like the United States and Britain.In Europe, officials pointed to positive signs as they started to reopen their economies.In Italy, where the day-to-day count of infections has been trending downward, bookstores, stationery stores, and shops selling baby supplies were allowed to open nationwide. Britain as of Monday reported more than 11,300 deaths of COVID-19 patients in hospitals. The grim forecast Tuesday underscored the dilemma facing world leaders as they strive to balance public health against economic stability.Around the world, India extended the world’s largest lockdown on 1.3 billion people until May 3. We ran away from having a king, and George Washington was president, not King Washington. The dead include a wave of victims in nursing homes.China faced a new flare-up along its remote northern border with Russia. Andrew Cuomo declared the “worst is over if we can continue to be smart.” More than 23,000 people have died of the virus in the United States overall, with close to 600,000 confirmed infections, according to a tally by Johns Hopkins University.Tensions between the White House and the nation’s governors increased when President Donald Trump claimed that he has “total” authority to decide how and when to reopen the economy. How state and global governments are cooperating to beat virus

As some communities are starting to see a decline in coronavirus cases, leaders around the globe are working together to find solutions to lessen negative effects from the pandemic shutdown. Cuomo, a Democrat, said Tuesday on NBC’s “Today.” We have a president. Maas said a contract-tracing app already being jointly developed by several countries showed that the EU “doesn’t have to copy the Big Brother methods of authoritarian states” but can instead safeguard both personal privacy and public health.Lothar Wieler, head of the Robert Koch Institute, Germany’s disease control center, said constantly exchanging information among countries and institutions about best practices, vaccine studies, and protecting vulnerable people is key.The virus has also forced rival companies to work together. That was a big decision. The governors of California, Oregon, and Washington announced a similar plan.More than 1.9 million infections have been reported and over 120,000 people have died worldwide, according to Johns Hopkins University. Loading… The main concern is to avoid a resurgence by the virus.As governments grapple with when and how to reopen their countries for business, the International Monetary Fund projected that the world economy will suffer its worst year since the Great Depression in the 1930s. On Tuesday, Southeast Asian leaders linked up by video to plot a strategy to overcome a crisis that has threatened their economies and sheltered millions at home. But without a vaccine or widespread antibody tests to determine how many people are immune to the virus, governments fear new outbreaks.Germany’s foreign minister, Heiko Maas, called for a single smartphone app across the European Union.”It’s important we don’t end up with a patchwork of 27 corona apps and 27 data protection regimes but coordinate as best as possible,” he told Germany’s Funke media group.Mr. But the head of one of the country’s biggest nursing home operators said Tuesday that the number of infections and deaths among the elderly is much higher than official reports.In the United States, governors in the Northeast and along the West Coast announced separate state groups to coordinate reopenings.California Gov. So the president doesn’t have total authority.”With social distancing and lockdowns in place across much of the world, projections that the virus would spread with equal ferocity to other corners have yet to materialize. In scramble for supplies, states start banding togetherNew infections appear to have leveled off in much of Asia and Europe, including Italy, France, Spain, and Germany, said Dr. Forestry workers, needed to clear dead trees ahead of the summer fire season, also returned to work.In Spain, where the official death toll rose to over 18,000, the country’s main epidemiology institute found an additional 1,500 “unexpected deaths” since mid-March after it studied mortality rates.Spanish workers returned Monday to some factory and construction jobs. “We still have to put the fire out” but also “make sure this doesn’t reignite.”New Jersey is in a coalition with Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island to figure out how to reopen their economies while still fighting the virus. In Britain, new data showed hundreds more people died of the virus than have been recorded in the government’s daily tally from hospitals. The Constitution largely delegates such authority to states.”We don’t have a king,” Mr. Stores and services were still closed, and the government required office workers to keep working from home.In Austria, hardware and gardening stores reopened Tuesday.

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Once the epicenter of the virus, China strives to keep it out

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But it is a popular alternative route into the country. In scramble for supplies, states start banding together”We are facing a truly grave situation in the northeast as represented by Suifenhe,” National Health Commission expert Wang Bin said Monday at a news conference. All land border crossings were halted last week.”The Chinese consulate again strongly reminds Chinese citizens not to summarily make trips to the border region,” the Chinese consulate in the nearby Russian city of Vladivostok said in a notice posted Monday.As Wuhan and other regions get back to business, Chinese authorities say they will remain vigilant against a second wave of infections, particularly from those arriving from outside the country.New cases of local infection in China have fallen to near zero after more than two months of strict travel bans and social distancing measures. China is facing a new coronavirus wave along its northern border with Russia, far from the epicenter of Wuhan. “Up to now our medical resources in the area have just not been sufficient.”The CDC said the field hospital has been supplied with negative pressure tents, nucleic acid extractors, virus detection kits, throat swab sampling tubes, and thermal cyclers used to enhance segments of DNA via the polymerase chain reaction.Roughly 800 miles northeast of Beijing, Suifenhe’s markets selling warm clothing, cellphones, and daily items usually do a thriving business with Russian visitors starved for choice on their side of the border. Of 89 cases reported on Tuesday, all but three were detected in people arriving from abroad. Staffed by 22 experts from the National Institute for Viral Disease Control and Prevention under the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, it will conduct nucleic acid tests and other forms of research to aid in virus control and prevention, allowing the city to test up to 1,000 cases per day, according to the CDC.Suifenhe, a city of just under 70,000 that is frozen-in for much of the year, has at least 243 imported COVID-19 cases out of nearly 1,000 confirmed and suspected cases. It wasn’t immediately clear if any came from Russia.No new deaths were reported in the country on Tuesday, suggesting the outbreak is running its course. Recent arrivals from Russia account for nearly half of China’s imported cases. It has closed hotels to visitors and is requiring travelers to have a pass showing they are not carrying the virus. Last week, authorities lifted a 76-day quarantine in Wuhan, where the virus was first detected late last year, an indication that the worst may have passed.China had recorded 82,249 cases and 3,341 deaths as of Tuesday, while 1,077 people suspected of having the virus or testing positive without showing symptoms were under isolation and monitoring. Dong Baosen/Xinhua/AP

Laborers work at an office building being converted into a temporary hospital in Suifenhe in northeastern China’s Heilongjiang Province, on April 10, 2020. Once the epicenter of the virus, China strives to keep it out

China closed its northern border with Russia after experiencing a new wave of COVID-19 cases. Many Chinese live and work in Russia, where China has major investments. Russia closed its land border to travelers from China in January.On the Chinese side, quarantines have been extended to a full month for people arriving by air in Suifenhe and in Heilongjiang’s capital, Harbin. That trade has gone quiet in recent weeks, dimming prospects for a sparsely populated region whose residents have been migrating to major cities seeking jobs and better living standards.Russia requires 14-day quarantines for all travelers arriving in Primorsky Krai and its regional capital Pogranichny, across the border. The virus originated in China, which is now striving to keep it out while the United States and other countries struggle to bring their own epidemics under control.The long, porous border of sprawling Heilongjiang province and neighboring Inner Mongolia has much less travel than major cities like Beijing and Shanghai. More than 100 people in the area have tested positive for the virus but showed no symptoms. Loading… April 14, 2020

By Ken Moritsugu
Associated Press

Beijing
China is facing a new coronavirus flare-up along its remote northern border with Russia, far from the epicenter of Wuhan, where it has all but declared victory in the battle against the pandemic.The frontier has been sealed and emergency medical units rushed to the area to prevent travelers from bringing the virus back from overseas. Many Chinese live and work in Russia, where China has major investments encouraged by warm ties between Beijing and Moscow.By Monday night, a field hospital was operating in the city of Suifenhe along the Russian border, equipped with a negative pressure lab to diagnose new cases.

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What a lockdown means when home is hundreds of miles away

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No paywall. What other option is there?” Mr. “I have to work and feed my family after all.”   Editor’s note: As a public service,   all our coronavirus coverage   is free. “The plan is to go back as soon as I can. Meghwal says.

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Most of them are at the front lines without safety gear and have not received proper training, Ms. The pandemic and lockdown has only exposed this fundamental flaw in India’s policy design.”Most migrants are not included in the Public Distribution System, which entitles poor families to subsidized grains. With many rural areas’ economies focused on agriculture, returned workers face few job prospects. In scramble for supplies, states start banding togetherThe announcement did not include any concrete transport, safety, or economic measures for India’s roughly 400 million informal workers, who are estimated to make up 80% to 90% of the total workforce and live without a safety net. Yet they remain an unenumerated, unrecognized presence in cities,” excluded from many welfare programs, says Nivedita Jayaram of the nonprofit Aajeevika Bureau, which advocates for migrants and laborers. But that can be practically impossible for society’s most vulnerable. Owing to the long list of intermediaries involved in employing a migrant worker, the order to pay wages is difficult to enforce too. Some states have tried to boost migrants’ support: Kerala, for example, was one of the first states to enhance social security pensions and set up shelters, and New Delhi has opened more than 1,000 food centers. With businesses and establishments shut down, they lost their daily wages; many of the country’s roughly 100 million migrant workers have also lost the roof over their head. In addition, “there are also a number of horrible rumors doing the rounds, some that refer to migrants being disease carriers and taken away by the police. But with such a large population already struggling with hunger, additional measures to address their health and safety have been pushed to the brink. But the crisis has shone a spotlight on inequalities that predate COVID-19. “‘What just happened?’ we wondered. That question has especially high stakes in India, where some 80% to 90% of the workforce are informal workers, often left out of safety-net schemes. Health experts are especially concerned about tuberculosis among migrant workers, particularly at a time when many will be malnourished. His household no longer has a source of income.In the face of a pandemic, a third of the global population is under some form of lockdown, and countries are grappling with how to balance health and the economy   – particularly for society’s most vulnerable. With roughly a dollar and a half in his pocket, and three other people for company, he traced his way through forested land, careful to avoid the main roads whenever possible. So this has all been really intimidating for them.”   At the best of times, accessing health care is challenging for many migrants. A few days later, fearing a surge in coronavirus cases due to the movement of migrants, the central government ordered states to seal their borders. Some states organized buses to help the migrants, but bus stops quickly became overcrowded. As the number of cases rises, many are calling for continued, but more humane, social distancing measures. Meghwal says. That challenge has played out on a massive scale in India. We have never experienced anything like this before in our lifetime.” Six days later, having covered more than 90 miles on foot, he reached his village in Rajasthan state.For over a decade, Mr. “We were scared,” Mr. But more is needed, especially in smaller towns and far-flung areas “where hunger is more stark and fear is more prevalent,” says Suroor Mander, a lawyer and activist with the nonprofit Karwan-e Mohabbat.“There is no simple answer to this tragic dilemma between two humanitarian crises   – the spread of the virus and the devastation caused by the lockdown – but some basic principles apply,” says Jean Drèze, an activist and visiting economics professor at the University of Ranchi. Returning migrants are reportedly being screened for the coronavirus in a number of states, but she is worried it isn’t rigorous enough.Teachers and health workers have hurriedly been asked to step in and screen returnees. “The migration system is broken now and this means there will be a shortage of labour in many sectors,” says Dipa Sinha, professor of economics at Delhi’s Ambedkar University. In one state, returning migrants were asked to squat on the road, and sprayed with a bleaching agent. “For instance, this is harvest season in northern India, which relies on migrant farm labourers from states like Bihar. “One of them is that no one should be allowed to starve.”More than hungerLiving in overcrowded homes or shelters, India’s workers have been left more vulnerable to the pandemic. On-the-ground implementation remains a challenge, however.The lockdown is scheduled to end Tuesday, but is likely to be extended. Altaf Qadri/AP

A couple carrying an infant walk along an expressway in Ghaziabad, on the outskirts of New Delhi, March 26, 2020, trying to reach their home hundreds of miles away. Balancing either the belongings on their heads or young children on their shoulders, hundreds of thousands tried to walk back home. Adnan Abidi/Reuters

Migrant workers and homeless people rest inside a sports complex turned into a shelter, during a 21-day nationwide lockdown to slow the spread of COVID-19, in New Delhi, India, April 4, 2020. What a lockdown means when home is hundreds of miles away

Why We Wrote This

“Stay at home” is a common refrain as countries announce lockdowns against COVID-19. India has the highest TB burden in the world, according to the World Health Organization, and the disease disproportionately affects   poor and marginalized people.Preparing for the long haul   Once India has provided adequate rations and cash distributions, experts warn, it needs to confront long-term challenges, including job creation. And the challenges perhaps have been most dire for 100 million internal migrant workers, many of whom attempted to walk hundreds of miles home after losing work, and often shelter, during the lockdown.Officials have since set up assistance, such as soup kitchens, and forbidden migrants’ landlords from demanding rent for the month. But the crisis has shone a spotlight on existing inequalities and resulting challenges that could endure beyond the lockdown.“There is no simple answer to this tragic dilemma between two humanitarian crises – the spread of the virus and the devastation caused by the lockdown – but some basic principles apply,” says Jean Drèze, an activist and visiting economics professor at the University of Ranchi. Meghwal worked as a waiter in the tourist hill town Mount Abu, and sent money to his family of six back home. Over the past week, India’s migrant workers spilled out of big cities that have been shuttered due to the coronavirus. … Small roadside shops provided them some food during the day and shelter outside their shuttered fronts at night. And on March 24, with only four hours’ notice, India began the world’s biggest test yet: Prime Minister Narendra Modi ordered the entire country of 1.3 billion people to stay indoors for 21 days.Editor’s note: As a public service,   all our coronavirus coverage   is free. Meghwal said his young children are frequently ill, but he is no longer able to take them to the nearest health center, about 15 miles away, because of the lockdown. But for now, many migrant workers’ main concern is their livelihood. the inability of the governments to be able to tell how many migrants are in a city, let alone reach them. The crops can’t be allowed to simply go to waste.”   The Mahatma Gandhi National Employment Rural Guarantee Act, which provides at least 100 days of paid employment per year to unskilled laborers, has come to a halt under the lockdown. In the longer run, however, workers’ advocates view it as a crucial system to provide income to migrant workers who’ve returned to their villages, and officials are asking for the strengthening of the act. “There is an absolute gap … Those disparities are likely to endure beyond this particular crisis.“India’s economic growth model is based on the cheap labour of rural-to-urban migrants who often work for less than minimum wages in its high growth sectors. No paywall. According to Manisha Dutta, a public health professional in Udaipur, there continues to be inconsistent, inadequate information about the pandemic, which has led to confusion and fear among migrant workers. Loading… Among Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development members and partners, India has the fewest number of hospital beds per 1,000 people. Many have faced hunger and police brutality. It announced food and cash assistance, forbade migrants’ landlords from demanding rent for a month, and ordered that businesses must pay wages for the duration of the lockdown. At least 22 migrants have died on the way. But suddenly, with the new coronavirus shutting down business, there was no work or wages, and he was forced to return home. An ambitious One Nation One Ration Card scheme, which aims to make subsidized food available to workers who are currently left out, is scheduled to be operational in June. April 13, 2020

Two ways to read the story

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Deep Read ( 5 Min. Dutta says. “One of them is that no one should be allowed to starve.”

New Delhi
Late last month, as India’s transport came to a halt and its residents prepared for lockdown, Prakash Meghwal began a long walk home. Mr. )

By Sarita Santoshini
Contributor

Like much of the globe, 1.3 billion people in India are under orders to stay inside due to the coronavirus pandemic.Here, as elsewhere, officials are wrestling with how to balance public health with the economy’s health, particularly for society’s most vulnerable.

Putin’s political agenda on hold as he faces virus backlash

Petrov told The Associated Press. Campaigns promoting the vote had already kicked off in dozens of Russian regions.In preparation for the vote and Victory Day, Russia’s state news agency Tass had begun releasing parts of a three-hour interview with Mr. But Tass suspended daily extracts of the interview, saying it was no longer relevant to an audience more concerned about the coronavirus.The outbreak has completely reset the Kremlin’s political agenda, said Nikolai Petrov, a senior research fellow in Chatham House’s Russia and Eurasia Program.”Everything that was happening before [the outbreak] has basically been wiped out,” Mr. Putin, whose approval ratings – steadily dropping in the past two years – reached 63% in March – the lowest since 2013.It comes as the prices of oil, Russia’s main source of income, plummeted amid a price war with Saudi Arabia, causing a sharp drop in the ruble. It was tormented by the Pechenegs and the Cumans, and Russia got through all of it. Putin, with the 67-year-old leader talking about what he has done for the country in the past 20 years and what else needs to be accomplished. Putin said.Social media users pointed out that not only did Mr. Putin has been widely criticized for paying little attention to the epidemic at first, and then for distancing himself from it by delegating difficult decisions on lockdowns to regional governments and the Cabinet.Some in the West have questioned the low number of official virus cases in Russia and dismissed its widely publicized effort to send planeloads of medical aid to Italy, the U.S., Serbia, and other countries as a PR stunt.Mr. The amendments already have been approved by lawmakers but the government wanted nationwide balloting to give the changes a democratic veneer. In scramble for supplies, states start banding togetherIt would seem impossible to have such a gala now, with much of Russia and the world locked down to stop the spread of the virus.Last week, Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said no decision has been made on whether to postpone it but authorities are considering “options,” one of which is to hold it without the veterans, a group especially vulnerable to the virus. Putin was shown donning a yellow hazmat suit to visit a hospital for infected patients.Officials then indefinitely postponed the vote on the constitutional reforms that would have allowed Mr. “That whole political agenda [of constitutional reform], that had been unfolding since mid-January is over.”He added that for the moment, “I think we can forget about the constitutional amendments.”The coronavirus crisis presents many difficulties for Mr. With the crisis still unfolding, it is likely to hurt his standing even more, said Denis Volkov, a sociologist with the independent Levada polling center.When people start fearing things getting worse “then the ratings start plummeting,” Mr. But after the coronavirus spread in Russia, that plebiscite had to be postponed – an action so abrupt that billboards promoting it already had been erected in Moscow and other big cities.Now under threat is a pomp-filled celebration of Victory Day on May 9, marking the 1945 defeat of Nazi Germany in World War II.The holiday has become the most important on Russia’s calendar, and this year is the 75th anniversary, with world leaders invited to a celebration highlighting the country’s exceptional role in history. Alexei Druzhinin/AP

President Vladimir Putin attends a meeting in Moscow on April 7, 2020. Mr. Peskov added the Kremlin would understand if foreign leaders decided not to come due to the pandemic and added the celebration would take place even if it doesn’t happen on May 9.Initially underestimated by Russian authorities, the pandemic has posed an unexpected challenge for Mr. But this time, as Russia is forced to confront a truly global crisis, that tactic seems much harder.”There can be nothing that would interest people more than the hardship they are going through and will continue to go through for a long time,” said Mr. Every year, thousands gather in Moscow, including many elderly veterans proudly wearing their medals.Military units have already rehearsed the traditional Red Square parade, drilling outside Moscow, and leaders such as France’s Emmanuel Macron and India’s Narendra Modi had promised to attend. Putin to serve two more six-year terms after 2024. Putin, whose political standing now depends on whether he can contain the damage from it.On March 24, Mr. Putin sugarcoated it by describing it as “nonworking days,” many business operations came to a halt, prompting fears of a mass shutdown by companies and leaving millions unemployed.The Chamber for Trade and Industries, a government-backed business association, predicted 3 million companies could go out of business and 8 million people – almost 11% of Russia’s working population – could end up jobless.A weakening economy and worsening living conditions, widely seen by analysts as the driving force behind Mr. Putin use this line in 2010, he might have borrowed it from an anecdote from the 19th century.”The risks of him looking out of touch are very real,” Samuel Greene, director of the Russia Institute at the King’s College London, told the AP.Mr. Petrov. Putin sought to reassure the nation in a TV address on April 8, but part of his message comparing the coronavirus to invaders from the 10th and 11th centuries brought mockery on social media instead.”Our country went through many serious challenges. A national vote on April 22 was supposed to finalize constitutional reforms that would have allowed him to stay in power until 2036, but after the coronavirus spread, those plans have been postponed. Loading… Putin’s souring ratings, have already become the dominating fear among Russians. April 13, 2020

By Daria Litvinova
Associated Press

Moscow
Spring is not turning out the way Russian President Vladimir Putin might have planned it.A nationwide vote on April 22 was supposed to finalize sweeping constitutional reforms that would allow him to stay in power until 2036, if he wished. We will defeat this coronavirus bug, too,” Mr. The pandemic brought with it the prospects of more economic devastation.As much of Russia went into lockdown, which Mr. Putin’s political agenda on hold as he faces virus backlash

With coronavirus taking center stage, Russian officials indefinitely postponed the constitutional reforms that would have allowed President Vladimir Putin to stay in power through 2036. Volkov told the AP.The Kremlin’s response to the crisis has raised questions at home and abroad.Domestically, Mr. Putin used to be able to regain control of the political agenda by shifting the focus from domestic hardships to Russia’s geopolitical grandeur, rallying people around the 2014 annexation of Crimea or fighting what he called terrorists in Syria.

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This story was reported by The Associated Press. It’s free. Editor’s note: As a public service, the Monitor has removed the paywall for all our coronavirus coverage.

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Sweden broke norms with ‘low-scale’ lockdown. Is it working?

They socialize in a very small circle, and limit their son’s contacts to people he sees at school or soccer practice.“Society is functioning, but I think it’s quite limited,” Mr. It’s a way of doing it.”But Swedish Health Minister Lena Hallengren recently told The Associated Press: “We have never had a strategy for herd immunity.”So far, Sweden has banned gatherings larger than 50 people, closed high schools and universities, and urged those over 70 or otherwise at greater risk from the virus to self-isolate.The softer approach means that schools for younger children, restaurants, and most businesses are still open, creating the impression that Swedes are living their lives as usual.Yet as Johan Klockar watches his son kick a ball around a field during a soccer practice in Stockholm, the financial analyst says it’s not like that. Sweden is suffering very, very badly. “Other than this sort of situation – schools, soccer practice – we basically stay at home.”And while most businesses in Sweden are still operating, the economic cost of the pandemic is already being felt. In much of the world, this sort of gathering would be frowned upon or even banned.Not in Sweden.It doesn’t worry Anders Tegnell, the country’s chief epidemiologist and top strategist in the fight against the   coronavirus pandemic.He has become a household name in Sweden, appearing across the media and holding daily briefings outlining the progression of the outbreak with a precise, quiet demeanor.As countries across   Europe have restricted the movement   of their citizens, Sweden stands out for what Mr. Lofven also warned citizens to prepare for possibly up to thousands of deaths.Nevertheless, Mr. He said: “Sweden did that – the herd. He and his wife work from home and avoid unnecessary outings. Tegnell, the chief epidemiologist, insists that Sweden’s approach still seems to make sense, though he also acknowledges that the world is in uncharted territory with the virus.He argues that while Sweden might have more infections in the short term, it will not face the risk of a huge infection spike that Denmark might face once its lockdown is lifted.“I think both Norway and Denmark are now very concerned about how you stop this complete lockdown in a way so you don’t cause this wave to come immediately when you start loosening up,” he said.He said authorities know that the physical distancing Swedes are engaging in works, because officials have recorded a sudden end to the flu season and to a winter vomiting illness.Lars Ostergaard, chief consultant and professor at the Department of Infectious Diseases at Aarhus University Hospital in Denmark, agrees it is too soon to know which approach is best.”Every day a person is not being infected because of the strict lockdown, we are a day closer to a cure,” Mr. They imposed a much stricter lockdown four weeks ago, closing borders, schools, and businesses. This week, the prime minister said by acting early, Denmark averted the tragedy that struck hard-hit nations like Italy and Spain, which together have seen at least 37,000 virus-related deaths, and will be ready after Easter for a slow return to normal life that starts with reopening preschools and primary schools.For weeks, the numbers of COVID-19 cases and fatalities were proportionally similar between Sweden and Denmark, but while the economic results of the strict isolation are being felt in Denmark, Sweden’s mortality rate has reached more than 88 dead per million, compared with around 47 dead per million in Denmark.Sweden, with a population of 10 million, has registered 899 deaths, while Denmark, with 5.8 million people, has 273 deaths.Worldwide,   the virus has infected a reported 1.8 million people   and killed 114,000, according to a tally by Johns Hopkins University.Still, due to limited testing, different ways of counting the dead and deliberate under-counting by some governments, experts believe those numbers vastly understate the pandemic’s true toll.After a sharp spike in deaths in Sweden, Prime Minister Stefan Lofven proposed an emergency law allowing the quick closure of public venues and transportation if needed. As countries across Europe have shut down, Sweden’s chief epidemiologist has advocated for a softer approach that is more sustainable over time. Mr. But he acknowledges that the long-term consequences of a locked-down community could also be “substantial.”“There is no right or wrong way,” Mr. Ostergaard said. Last week, 25,350 Swedes registered as unemployed, according to the Stockholm Chamber of Commerce – a larger increase than during the 2008 financial crisis.In contrast, just across a narrow strip of sea, neighboring Denmark is already talking about reopening society. Ostergaard said, underlining the advantage of the Danish approach. Tegnell calls a “low-scale” approach that “is much more sustainable” over a longer period. April 13, 2020

By David Keyton and Vanessa Gera
Associated Press

Stokholm
Crowds swarm Stockholm’s waterfront, with some people sipping cocktails in the sun. Andres Kudacki/AP

Young people hang out in front of a restaurant in Stockholm, Sweden on April 8, 2020. Loading… Klockar said. Sweden has allowed children’s schools, restaurants, and most businesses to remain open while encouraging social distancing. As virus deaths and unemployment rise, Sweden’s chief epidemiologist insists the country’s relaxed approach still makes sense. “No one has walked this path before, and only the aftermath will show who made the best decision.” Is it working? They called [it] the herd. In scramble for supplies, states start banding togetherPresident Donald Trump has suggested that a rising number of COVID-19 deaths indicate Sweden is paying a heavy price for embracing the idea of herd immunity – that is, letting many individuals get sick to build up immunity in the population. Sweden broke norms with ‘low-scale’ lockdown.
Gera reported from Warsaw, Poland.Editor’s note: As a public service, the Monitor has removed the paywall for all our coronavirus coverage. It’s free. Ms. This story of was reported by The Associated Press.

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Monday Sunrise Briefing: Historic oil deal offers stability

No paywall.This is a beta test – an experiment with an early Monday morning news update. Please give us your feedback via the link below and let us know what you think. Thank you! Finally, check out the Monitor’s selected stories from Friday’s subscription-only Daily Edition:
In scramble for supplies, states start banding together

As Britain battles a pandemic, a volunteer spirit stirs

Coronavirus gives some protesters new mission: Preserving life

Coronavirus crunch: One city block reveals small businesses at risk

To reach his flock in a crisis, one minister turns to the old tools

Editor’s note: As a public service,   all our coronavirus coverage   is free.
Voters will choose all 300 members of the parliament. As of Friday, U.S. April 13, 2020

By David Clark Scott
Audience Engagement Editor
@davidclarkscott

A historic oil agreement Sunday puts an end to a damaging price war, and provides some stability to oil and stock markets. doctors and nurses, calling out “Jenny from New Zealand” and “Luis from Portugal,” who he said “stood by my bedside for 48 hours when things could have gone either way.”   3. NBC Universal debuts “Peacock” on Comcast cable before rolling out to more audiences this summer. Ms. Bocelli said. In Kentucky, state police handed out quarantine notices and wrote down license plate numbers of the dozens of people who met at a Baptist church. All profits go to Rustic Marlin employees and other area small businesses. In Germany, officials plan to meet Wednesday to discuss plans to return to work.Mr. Gaga has already raised more than $35 million by lobbying 68 CEOs, reports Vogue. In Hanover, Massachusetts, the Rustic Marlin sign shop is making signs of appreciation for coronavirus frontline workers, collecting donations to help small businesses, and boosting   community spirit. “I believe in the strength of praying together; I believe in the Christian Easter, a universal symbol of rebirth that everyone — whether they are believers or not — truly needs right now,” Mr. Europe emerging. A bevy of stars and late-night hosts will join Lady Gaga for the “One World: Together At Home” benefit concert for the World Health Organization. Now, they employ a team of more than 30 designers, artists, and craftsmen. The likely No. The little signs are sold at half-a-dozen unmanned kiosks south of Boston on the honor system: pick a sign and leave a check or send the money digitally via Venmo. They’ve raised more than $30,000 so far. That’s when they hatched the idea. But in Denmark, schools and day care centers will reopen Monday. hasn’t flattened the coronavirus curve yet, but across Europe the first steps to lift lockdowns are underway. Many congregations met online. crude was trading at $22.76 per barrel, down 63% year-to-date. Easter expressed. “The idea is to use the profits to assist ordinary people that just a few weeks ago had jobs within a small business but now their world has been turned upside down because the company they work at had to close,” Mr. The “Signs of Hope” initiative was launched by Melanie and Brian O’Neil, who started their sign making business in their garage in 2012. President Donald Trump praised the deal on Twitter, saying it would save “hundreds of thousands of energy jobs” in the U.S. No paywall.Look AheadWednesday, April 15Leadership test. Players will take turns calling their shot and trash-talking while their opponent tries to duplicate it. First to spell HORSE loses.   Editor’s note: As a public service,   all our coronavirus coverage   is free. For $20, you can buy a sign with a heart or “hope” and give it to a frontline worker – a grocery store clerk, a doctor, a fireman, a nurse. REUTERS/Essam Al-Sudani/File Photo

A man wears a protective face mask while overlooking flare stacks at Nahr Bin Umar oil field, near Basra, Iraq March 9, 2020. Some congregated in their cars in church parking lots, obeying social-distancing rules. Welcome to your Monday, April 13, 2020, sunrise briefing. Here are three news events from this past weekend (while you may have been hunting Easter eggs, kite surfing, and enjoying an offline life). Yes, another streaming service. Also, what to look for in the news this week. Hidden gemStart your week with a recent story that inspired Monitor readers:Lapping the living room: Lockdown marathoners get creativeSneak previewIn tonight’s Daily Edition, watch for our story about   Leonardo Pavkovic, owner of the world’s most unusual boutique record label, MoonJune Music. But the coronavirus lockdown hit their small business as hard as any other. O’Neil said in a statement.There’s one more wrinkle: the couple is banking on the integrity of the public. Christians around the world, mostly forbidden to gather, celebrated Easter Sunday in novel ways. Monday Sunrise Briefing: Historic oil deal offers stability

Why We Wrote This

Good morning! You can watch the finals of this week’s HORSE tournament, where current and former NBA and WNBA stars face off (on their own courts) with $200,000 being donated to coronavirus relief efforts. In Spain, some factories and construction sites will reopen this week, while the general public remains under stay-at-home orders until April 26. 2. President Moon Jae-in and his party have benefited by getting the outbreak under control relatively quickly. WHO officials say it’s premature. If they fail, they get a letter. Oil prices would have fallen anyway as factories and commuters worldwide went on coronavirus lockdown, but the decline was exacerbated by a feud between Saudi Arabia and Russia. The U.K. In New York, members of churches from across the city stayed home and sang “Christ the Lord is Risen Today” from balconies and windows. With free and paid tiers, the service offers reruns of old TV and movie favorites, as well as new programming, such as “Division One” with Amy Poehler starring as a women’s college soccer coach.Thursday, April 16HORSE hoops. A group of 23 oil-producing nations agreed to an unprecedented cut of nearly 10 million barrels, or a tenth of global supply. Sometimes a sign of hope is, well, literally a sign of hope. Andrea Bocelli sang his message of hope at the cathedral in Milan, Italy, which was live-streamed on Youtube. Roadmap for recovery: G20 finance ministers and central bank governors meet via video to discuss plans for handling the pandemic as well as how to restart the global economy.Peacock premieres. Johnson released a video expressing profound gratitude for U.K. Friday, April 17Sports, sort of: The WNBA draft starts tonight on ESPN at 7 p.m. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson was released from the hospital Sunday. In scramble for supplies, states start banding together  

REUTERS/Alex Fraser

Italian opera singer Andrea Bocelli at Duomo square on Easter Sunday, in Milan, Italy, April 12, 2020. “Even if you didn’t hear everyone, God heard everyone,” said Kathy Keller, of Redeemer Presbyterian Church, who helped organize the Easter2020 event. Loading… Generosity Watch

Rustic Marlin via Facebook

On Easter Sunday, someone bought a sign of hope at a kiosk in Hanover, Massachusetts. South Korea is the first country to hold a major election amid the coronavirus crisis. Broadcast by ESPN. 1 pick is Sabrina Ionescu of Oregon, but there’s also buzz around two of her Ducks teammates, Satou Sabally and Ruthy Hebard.Saturday, April 18COVID-19 concert. “This is at least a temporary relief for the energy industry and for the global economy,” oil analyst Per Magnus Nysveen told the Associated Press.

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Points of Progress: Ireland will ban certain tobacco products, and more

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The plan also aims to cut emissions by 48% by 2050, becoming carbon-neutral by the end of the century. The inexpensive and eco-friendly pumps harness pressure from fast-flowing water to drive water uphill and deliver it to mountaintop crops, where irrigation was not previously possible. television has increased over the past four years. More recently, the new Netflix documentary “Crip Camp,” which tells the story of the disability revolution in the 1970s that successfully brought the subject center stage, has received strong reviews. The EU directive sets out rules governing the manufacture, presentation, and sale of tobacco and related products with the intent of discouraging smoking. (Thomson Reuters Foundation)4. And to garden here is our therapy,” said Refiloe Molefe, an urban farmer for 10 years. The pumps were installed two years ago under a project led by the International Center for Integrated Mountain Development. “We may not have money, but we have land and food. South Africa

Melanie Stetson Freeman/Staff/File

Dudu Duru harvests crops in one of the urban gardens at Victoria Yards, a multiuse complex under development in Johannesburg, on March 2, 2018. Points of Progress: Ireland will ban certain tobacco products, and more

Why We Wrote This

This is more than feel-good news – it’s where the world is making concrete progress. The United Nations Development Program has given Pakistan additional funding to install 20 more hydro-ram pumps in 12 villages. PakistanUse of the hydraulic ram, a pump that doesn’t require electricity or fuel to operate, is turning barren land green in Pakistan. More than 40% of its population of 4.4 million is deemed food-insecure. Loading… So far, the pumps have revived about 60 acres of barren land and benefited 300 households. Russia

Anton Vaganov/Reuters/File

Activists attend the Global Climate Strike in St. All tobacco advertising, smaller packs of rolling tobacco, and 10-packs of cigarettes are also already banned. A report by the Ruderman Family Foundation, which looked at 284 shows across 37 networks and four streaming platforms, found that more than half of network shows and 42% of streaming shows included characters with disabilities in 2018. The world’s fifth-largest emitter of greenhouse gases (after China, the U.S., the EU, and India) is showing political and economic motivation to curb climate change. (Thomson Reuters Foundation) Not only are urban farmers using their land to grow food and feed their community, but they are also helping to introduce green spaces in areas known for high crime. (Disability Scoop, The Guardian)2. A roundup of positive stories to inspire you. IrelandIreland is set to ban menthol and rolling tobacco May 20 as part of a four-year phasing-in period of the 2016 European Union directive on tobacco products. Although climate experts say Russia’s strategy is not aggressive enough, it does show new willingness to address climate change concerns from one of the world’s biggest suppliers of fossil fuels. 20, 2019. Staff

Places where the world saw progress, for the April 20, 2020 Monitor Weekly. There are about 300 urban farms in Johannesburg. According to the plan, Russia pledges to cut emissions by a third by 2030 from its 1990 level. April 10, 2020

By Nusmila Lohani
Staff writer

1. Russia officially joined the Paris Agreement in September 2019. Branding of any kind has been outlawed already across Europe, and tobacco products are currently sold in plain packaging with prominent health warnings. The positive results could be key in helping Pakistan’s mountain communities adapt to climate change-induced droughts and floods, say experts. A growing number of urban farms are taking root in Johannesburg, South Africa’s largest city. Vegetable gardens are sprouting in schoolyards, outside clinics and churches, across rooftops, and in backyards. (Euronews, The Irish Times)   3. United StatesDisability representation and inclusion on U.S. The European Commission estimates these regulations and laws will reduce the number of smokers across the EU by some 2.4 million. Among the top 10 Nielsen-rated television shows, characters with disabilities played by actors with the same disabilities rose from 5% to 12% between 2016 and 2018. Shows like “Atypical” on Netflix and “This Close” on Sundance Now are two examples of shows with authentic casting. Russia, for the first time, has announced a long-term, low-carbon development plan. Petersburg, Russia, Sept. The country’s government plans to address climate change. (Thomson Reuters Foundation)5. Menthol cigarette companies target younger people who are more prone to start smoking if offered flavored cigarettes, say tobacco experts.

(The Guardian, Nature)Editor’s note: An earlier version of this article’s headline referred incorrectly to the content. Up until 2000, the jet stream had been shifting from its course   as a result of ozone layer depletion. The ozone hole is at its smallest since it was detected in 1985. 20, 2019. Worldwide

Goddard Space Flight Center/NASA/AP

The purple and blue colors indicate the lowest concentration of ozone; yellow and red, the highest in this South Pole image of Earth captured Oct. Last September, satellite images showed the ozone hole’s annual peak had shrunk to 63.3 million square miles, the smallest extent since 1982. The southern jet stream is a powerful wind that shapes weather patterns and ocean currents in the Southern Hemisphere, affecting South America, East Africa, and Australia. Scientists and experts credit the reversal to the Montreal Protocol of 1989, an international treaty to phase out chemicals that damage the ozone layer. Recent evidence shows that efforts to repair the hole in the ozone layer are helping the southern jet stream to return to a normal state.
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As Britain battles a pandemic, a volunteer spirit stirs

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“But the crisis did reveal some people’s capacity to think about others, rather than themselves. No paywall. And, of course, that is quite inspiring.”Editor’s note: As a public service, all our coronavirus coverage   is free.

Johnson had already shepherded several key decisions about the national lockdown, and a £350 million financial rescue package that was adopted by lawmakers on March 17. For others, it was more symbolic: If the prime minister could fall seriously ill, so could everyone.Mr. The horn has not been sounded properly in 20 years and is the loudest siren in Belfast. Johnson and the ruling Conservative Party added clarity to a Brexit mandate and was seen by many as a potential first step in healing deep divisions in Britain’s political and social fabric. Raab said Thursday a decision to ease restrictions was at least another week away. is not alone in showing newfound public affection for key workers, nor in facing an unprecedented public health emergency that has, in Europe, especially ravaged Italy, Spain, and France. … to clap, cheer, and bang pots and pans to show support for the country’s front-line doctors and nurses.Each week the crescendo of gratitude has grown louder, sometimes punctuated by the blast of fireworks, filling otherwise becalmed neighborhoods briefly with appreciative noise for those at the tip of the spear, as they battle the spread of the coronavirus.But as the death toll today hit a single-day U.K. … A survey of nearly 3,500 nurses published Friday found that two-thirds did not feel they had access to sufficient safety equipment. We will meet again,” she said. Loading… Johnson since he was admitted to the hospital, but that the government has “got this covered.” Mr. But the country is finding common cause against the virus. That sense of unity was reinforced by a rare public address last Sunday by Queen Elizabeth II that was warmly received by many. At the same time, hundreds of thousands of citizens recently volunteered to support the pandemic response, far more than the government had anticipated. Prime Minister Boris Johnson was admitted to the hospital on Sunday and has spent his days and nights in intensive care fighting the virus, surrounded by the doctors and nurses of the National Health Service.“They’ve had a tough week,” said Joan, a 60-something Briton, as she banged on a frying pan on her west London porch last night, referring to key workers. Johnson’s condition has improved, and that may provide some relief for a country that only recently emerged from years of political turmoil over its exit from the European Union. Every Thursday night, U.K. Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP

An image of Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II and quotes from her historic television broadcast commenting on the coronavirus pandemic are displayed on a big screen behind the Eros statue at Piccadilly Circus in London on April 9, 2020. His is one of 65,000 confirmed COVID-19 cases in the U.K. Jon Super/AP

A man on a bike takes a photo of a NHS sign printed on a road near the newly setup coronavirus Nightingale Hospital North West in Manchester, England, on April 9, 2020. His father, Stanley Johnson, told the BBC today how touched he had been by the outpouring of support the family had received, and said his son would need time to fully recover. London
Across the United Kingdom, as the COVID-19 crisis has bitten deeper, its citizens have started a new ritual: Emerging from self-isolation every Thursday night at 8 p.m. When Mr. April 10, 2020

Two ways to read the story

Quick Read
Deep Read ( 5 Min. No paywall. Johnson had been rushed to the hospital, raising the specter of a leadership vacuum that, amid the pandemic, renewed a sense of political uncertainty.The sense of uncertainty “operates on a number of levels, and they’re all destabilizing,” says Steven Fielding, an expert on British politics and political history at the University of Nottingham.“The very fact that the prime minister had been taken to hospital was something people genuinely found a bit disturbing,” says Professor Fielding.“They were concerned about how decisions would be made, and obviously political journalists have been trying to follow, ‘Who’s actually in charge now?’” he says. Johnson’s temporary incapacitation “is not necessarily a crisis for the British political system,” says Vernon Bogdanor, a professor of government at King’s College, London, in an analysis for Foreign Policy that tabulates the absences of past prime ministers.During World War II, for example, Winston Churchill had bouts of pneumonia, and in 1953, an incapacitating stroke, but remained prime minister on both occasions, even as others were deputized to preside.Austerity budget bluesBut severe social inequalities across the U.K., a wealthy country that has pockets of deep deprivation not seen in its European peers, may have lasting, post-crisis impact. residents on lockdowns emerge from their homes to clap and cheer the doctors and nurses of the National Health Service. Johnson was returned to a normal hospital ward late Thursday after spending three nights in intensive care. “While we may have still more to endure, better days will return. That means, for now, that Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab, who is deputized to act for Mr. Mr. Raab said he has “all the authority I need” to make decisions.Indeed, Mr. The U.K.’s unwritten constitution does not spell out a clear succession process if a prime minister is incapacitated.Mr. Pippa Fowles/10 Downing Street/AP

Britain’s Prime Minister Boris Johnson claps outside 11 Downing Street during a moment of applause for workers fighting the coronavirus pandemic in London on April 2, 2020. He told a press briefing that he had not spoken to Mr. That sense of solidarity was referenced by the monarch in language that invoked the sacrifices of World War II. record of 980 – and with the peak death rate still estimated to be two weeks away – the crisis caused by the scale of the pandemic has been compounded here by a new degree of political uncertainty. “They’re amazing,” she said, as her suburban neighborhood joined in the rallying cry.Editor’s note: As a public service, all our coronavirus coverage   is free. )

By Scott Peterson
Staff writer
@peterson__scott

Prime Minister Boris Johnson spent this week in the hospital, raising concerns about political stability amid a pandemic. “They’re literally sacrificing their lives.“And people said at the time: ‘We’ve now got a new kind of citizenship, which will go forward into the world, after the war.’ It didn’t quite work out like that, so people went back largely to how they had been before,” he says. In scramble for supplies, states start banding togetherThe U.K. at a politically precarious moment, as a nation finally emerging from 3 1/2 years of political gridlock over its chaotic departure from the European Union. A recent U.K. Auden called a “low dishonest decade,” in which those qualities were seen as missing in action.“People are volunteering to go into bombers to fly over Germany and face almost near-certain death, in order to win this war, on behalf of everybody,” says Mr. As Britain battles a pandemic, a volunteer spirit stirs

Why We Wrote This

The United Kingdom has been riven by the Brexit debate in recent years, and the coronavirus pandemic has only added a new element of uncertainty. Jason Cairnduff/Reuters

People applaud as the Harland and Wolff shipyard horn sounds in support of the NHS in Belfast, Northern Ireland, on April 9, 2020, while the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues. “While we may have still more to endure, better days will return. Johnson, is unlikely to have to make any critical moves.Nearly 9,000 people have died from the virus in the U.K., with more than 65,000 confirmed cases.With the Easter weekend looming, Mr. Acknowledging the impact of the coronavirus on daily lives, Queen Elizabeth II, in a rare address on Sunday, praised the “national spirit” and thanked NHS and care workers, whose “every hour” of hard work “brings us closer to a return to a more normal time.”Calling on citizens to “remain united and resolute” to overcome the pandemic, she sought to provide comfort. A December election that gave a decisive victory to Mr. We will meet again,” she said.“Who’s in charge now?”Yet within an hour of hearing those words that would resonate widely, Britons learned that Mr. “I wouldn’t like to say it’s a new kind of spirit,” says Professor Fielding, who has authored several books on Britain’s postwar political history.Back then, people had discovered purpose and solidarity in a conflict that followed a period that poet W.H. Fielding. Johnson was shown clapping for health workers last Thursday at the door of 10 Downing Street, for example, social media erupted with charges of hypocrisy, pointing to a decade of Conservative-led austerity budgets that especially pared down the NHS. government appeal for 250,000 volunteers to help the NHS cope yielded an army of 750,000 would-be helpers, precipitating a temporary stop to clear the backlog.But the pandemic finds the U.K. Just under a third had bought their own.And a Royal College of Nursing study last September that found a shortage of 40,000 nurses in England alone.“From defunding nurse training to selling off parts of the NHS to private companies, the Tory party in power has hobbled the healthcare system’s ability to deal with the everyday, let alone the exceptional,” wrote one Guardian columnist last week.That has meant online skepticism of social media campaigns like #PrayForBoris.Still, citizens have rallied together, evoking the memories of the spirit of community and selfless volunteerism that rose during World War II, which were echoed by the queen.Revisiting the Blitz spirit   Yet it remains to be seen how deeply British society might change after the pandemic threat recedes, if World War II is any guide. There is a shortage of intensive care beds, and some health care workers have been forced to buy their own protective gear.
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Coronavirus gives some protesters new mission: Preserving life

One innovation is an online “guide” to protesting from home. Joe Penney/Reuters/File

Members of Senegalese civic movement Y’en a Marre meet at their office in Dakar in June 2013. Barro, “but for now our aim has to be to preserve life.”From Senegal to Santiago, from Hong Kong to New Delhi, streets that over the past year brimmed with an unprecedented wave of protests and discontent have gone mostly silent. No paywall. )

By Howard LaFranchi
Staff writer

From Senegal to Santiago, from Hong Kong to New Delhi, streets that over the past year brimmed with protests have gone mostly silent amid the coronavirus pandemic. So there’s little reason to think that the global discontent was a blip that won’t survive the coronavirus pandemic,” says Jonathan Pinckney at the United States Institute of Peace.In Senegal, the group Y’en a Marre has switched its message from demanding transparent democracy to the more pressing need of promoting good social-distancing practices. Pinckney of the United States Institute of Peace   says he expects the pandemic to affect various national protest movements in distinct ways, with some weakened and others reinforced.“In some countries we’re already seeing a rallying around the flag that could work against any expression of opposition, but in other countries they’re adapting in ways that are likely to leave [the movement] stronger,” he says. He also notes that the rough police treatment accorded some people displaced by the pandemic – as occurred in India – could turn into heightened repression once mass demonstrations return.But Mr. “But certainly all these actions are to some degree about maintaining our momentum.”Mr. Velasquez in Santiago believes Chile’s movement will come out of the coronavirus challenge stronger – and he cites one experience in particular that has left him confident of that.At home in his 16th-floor apartment one recent evening, he opened his windows to hear Freddie Mercury’s rendition of “Day-O” spontaneously shouted from balconies across his neighborhood, the words and responding cheers wafting across the city like a message of unity and hope. Loading… He also worries that the state will use the pandemic as a “pretext” for extending limits on personal freedoms.Mr. He notes that a recent poll measuring public perceptions of responses to the pandemic showed higher marks for the pro-democracy movement and falling support for the Hong Kong government.In Chile, where a subway fare hike in October touched off months of protests over widening economic divides, activists have quickly moved much of their expression of discontent indoors, while shifting their focus to the pandemic – and to the inequalities in access to health care and other services they say it highlights.“The movement that got started on October 18 was all about economic inequality, the inadequacy of public services like health, education, and transportation, and the daily struggles of the many in a country where wealth is concentrated in the hands of so few,” says Andrés Velasquez, an administrator for a small Santiago construction company who regularly participated in the protests.“It’s true that we can no longer gather in huge numbers in Plaza de Italia,” Santiago’s ground zero for the protest movement, he says. “The activists who organized these movements aren’t going away, and their underlying grievances aren’t going away, so there’s little reason to think that the global discontent was a blip that won’t survive the coronavirus pandemic,” says Jonathan Pinckney, chief researcher at the Program on Nonviolent Action at the United States Institute of Peace in Washington.“If anything,” he adds, “we are seeing the movements in many countries adapt and shift to using the coronavirus crisis to highlight issues like government incompetence and negligence that were already among the major rallying cries of protesters before the pandemic.”As one example, he cites how the Hong Kong pro-democracy movement over recent weeks has shifted to digital forms of expression to highlight what activists judge has been an already dismissive government’s inadequate response to the pandemic.At the same time, some networks within Hong Kong’s movement have moved beyond criticizing the government to taking matters into their own hands – for example by organizing to import more than 100,000 medical masks to distribute in poorly served communities. Y’en a Marre organizes car caravans from which musicians, one per car, perform the new songs as they cruise from one neighborhood to another.“The time for protest and mass demonstrations will return,” adds Mr. “But for now our aim has to be to preserve life.”

Just over a month ago, Senegal’s social action group Y’en a Marre – “Fed Up” in French – was spearheading mass street demonstrations to protest everything from unresponsive government and public-sector corruption to high electricity bills.These days taking it to the streets is no longer feasible, as governments around the globe ban large public gatherings in response to the coronavirus pandemic. And that, he adds, could mean stepped up public support for protest movements.Mr. Rather the mass protests are likely to come back once conditions allow.Not only have few of the protesters’ demands been addressed, experts say, but in many places the pandemic has only underscored some of their grievances, including indifferent government and the growing divide between haves and have-nots.“The activists who organized these movements aren’t going away, and their underlying grievances aren’t going away. But social action groups dedicated to the common good are finding the means, and new directions, to refocus their energies – temporarily. Pinckney has a hunch that in some places the pandemic, because of how it represents a threat to all social strata, will tend to increase a sense of empathy with the most vulnerable. April 10, 2020

Two ways to read the story

Quick Read
Deep Read ( 5 Min. One result, Mr. “But the epidemic has only reinforced people’s thinking about the weaknesses and unfairness in our economic and governance systems.”Chile’s activists have lost little time in adapting their action to the new constraints of the coronavirus. Coronavirus gives some protesters new mission: Preserving life

Why We Wrote This

This particular season of discontent is not conducive to conventional mass protests. People aren’t taking the epidemic seriously. In scramble for supplies, states start banding together“Right now there is a lot of denial in Senegal. But activists and experts say the quiet does not mean the movements have died out. “The time for protest and mass demonstrations will return,” says Fadel Barro, one of the group’s founders and leaders. Farro in Senegal is not so sure. Among the expressions of discontent are regular caserolazos – the banging of pots and pans from windows and balconies at an appointed hour, often announced on Facebook – that have been a staple of protest in Latin America since the grim days of dictatorships in the ’70s and ’80s.Mr. But that does not mean the musicians, rappers, journalists, and other activists comprising Y’en a Marre have gone silent.Au contraire.Now the group known for its protest songs and for rallying Senegalese youth to action is adapting to address what Y’en a Marre’s leaders say is the West African nation’s biggest immediate threat.Editor’s note: As a public service,   all our coronavirus coverage   is free. Pinckney says, is that a movement that in some respects was losing steam has found new purpose, with its public backing reinforced. Jessie Pang/Reuters

Pro-democracy veteran Leung Kwok-hung speaks to reporters in Hong Kong before a Court of Appeal ruling on the controversial anti-mask law that the government had a right to invoke colonial-era emergency legislation, April 9, 2020. Velasquez says he has made his own adjustments to his protest routine. A journalist by training, he remains skeptical that the pandemic will necessarily mean a stronger protest movement ahead.“For sure it will change the way people interact with each other, but experience tells us that societies don’t change so easily, even after crises,” he says. So we have decided to switch gears to get vital information out there and be of public utility,” says Fadel Barro, one of Y’en a Marre’s founders and leaders.A song list that before demanded a transparent democracy now promotes good social-distancing practices and implores Senegalese youth to stay home and meet with friends online. But activists in many of these hotbeds of public dissatisfaction, as well as experts studying the global phenomenon, say the quiet does not mean the movements have died out.Less like annuals that last but one season and more like perennials whose roots have been established and will grow again, they say, the mass protests are likely to come back once conditions allow.Not only have few of the demands that sparked the protests been addressed, experts say, but in many places the pandemic has only underscored some of the key motivating factors behind the discontent – from indifferent government and failing public services to growing divides between the haves and have-nots. Until the pandemic ended the mass marches, he joined other volunteers in providing food – which they dubbed “Hooded Gourmet” – to the often-hooded protesters making up the front line separating the mass of demonstrators from the police.Now the protest-food cooks have shifted to providing meals to Santiago’s ramshackle camps of day laborers and the swelling ranks of people left unemployed as a result of the crisis.“This movement has always been about solidarity, so we’re all looking for ways to maintain that solidarity and help us all get beyond this virus together,” Mr. One of its founding members, Fadel Barro (in blue shirt, against wall), says "the time for protest and mass demonstrations will return," but for now the group is switching gears to confront the coronavirus pandemic. Velasquez says.
No paywall. After that communal experience and others like it, he says, “I’m certain this movement will come back, and will come back with even greater force.”Editor’s note: As a public service,   all our coronavirus coverage   is free.

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