Friv Latino Music

Music and Lyrics everywhere

Under cover of COVID, ISIS is seeking a comeback

Get the Monitor Stories you care about delivered to your inbox.

By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy.

Mr. It wishes states would pay attention.“From approximately March 2020, the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic became a factor in ISIL operational, propaganda, and fundraising activities,” the U.N. and analysts’ estimates. The five countries of the Sahel region south of the Sahara – Burkina Faso, Chad, Mali, Mauritania, and Niger – have formed a joint military force that is working with France to battle Islamic extremists as jihadist attacks mount. The pandemic amplifies, they say, what ISIS attempts to achieve through its attacks and propaganda.“ISIS focuses on exposing the same failures in a country that the coronavirus is now exposing: collapse of the nation-state, weak security, and deep economic, political, cultural, and sectarian crises,” says Hassan Abu Haniya, an expert in Islamist and extremist movements.“Although the U.S.-led coalition focused on containing and dismantling ISIS, they never addressed the root grievances in Arab countries that allowed its rise in the first place,” he says. For ISIS, the world’s preoccupation with the global coronavirus pandemic and neglect of the battle against extremism have created opportunities it is poised to seize. Hassan at the Center for Global Policy. “Coronavirus is now laying these bare once again and exacerbating them.”

AMMAN, Jordan
The Islamic State is eyeing a comeback on the battlefield and the world stage, testing a fragile global community that is combating the coronavirus and distracted from its fight against extremism.ISIS is taking advantage of the pandemic’s burden on local governments and world powers’ inward focus to step up attacks and pitch to new recruits, the United Nations and experts warn, and reemerge from the hinterlands to strike in the Arab world and Africa.The reawakening of ISIS exposes not only the fragility of the status quo, but the extremist group’s evolution as a movement. Abu Haniya, the Jordanian expert, takes a longer view.“The West and the world shouldn’t forget that ISIS has gone through this phase and metamorphosis before,” he says.“In 2009, after the U.S. Its ranks boast around 10,000 fighters, according to U.N. expertise in counter-insurgency operations is needed now to stem ISIS’s resurgence and is especially missed, analysts note.“The fact that ISIS can operate almost freely in a massive and expansive space in Iraq and Syria without popular support says a lot about how Iraq cannot secure itself … without current American involvement,” says Mr. Loading… “Add to this the fact that with the pandemic, the last thing on people’s minds was ISIS.”COVID as catalystIraq has struggled with a surge in coronavirus cases. July 28, 2020

Two ways to read the story

Quick Read
Deep Read ( 5 Min. Hassan, who chronicled ISIS’s rise in Syria.“It almost looks like 2013 in Iraq and Syria. surge and the Sunni ‘Sahwa’ awakening movements drove Al Qaeda in Iraq to the desert in the hinterlands, it reorganized, adapted and waited to stage a comeback as ISIS in 2014,” he notes.“This is history repeating itself.”

Ludovic Marin/AP

French President Emmanuel Macron, second left, listens as Mauritania President Mohamed Ould Cheikh El Ghazouani, third right, speaks during the G5 Sahel summit on June 30, 2020, in Nouakchott, Mauritania. forces have largely come to a standstill amid the tensions with Iran-backed militias following the January assassination of Iranian Gen. And across Syria, despite government statistics claiming the contrary, the virus is ravaging communities, according to citizens, the U.N., and health officials in neighboring states.Syria and Lebanon are also witnessing economic collapse, and in much of the Arab world, populations are struggling under lockdown-imposed economic costs and rising joblessness.With health sectors and economies crumbling, experts are highlighting what they call a “symmetry” between the militant group and the vicious virus.COVID-19 amplifies, they say, what ISIS attempts to achieve through its attacks and propaganda, exposing inequality, communities’ disenfranchisement, and the failures of the state.“ISIS focuses on exposing the same failures in a country that the coronavirus is now exposing: collapse of the nation-state, weak security, and deep economic, political, cultural, and sectarian crises,” says Hassan Abu Haniya, an Amman-based Jordanian expert in Islamist and extremist movements.“Although the U.S.-led coalition focused on containing and dismantling ISIS, they never addressed the root grievances in Arab countries that allowed its rise in the first place,” he says.   Editor’s note: As a public service,   all our coronavirus coverage   is free. strike disrupt America’s fragile common cause with Shiite militias against ISIS, but it triggered a wave of revenge attacks that prompted U.S. “Coronavirus is now laying these bare once again and exacerbating them.”Divisions in IraqIn Iraq, political and security setbacks are lowering the resistance to ISIS.Sectarian infighting among and between Shiite, Kurdish, and Sunni militias has created local power vacuums, allowing ISIS to fill back in, including north of Baghdad and in the disputed areas near Iraqi Kurdistan, experts and analysts say.And the Iraqi government, under a new prime minister, Mustafa al-Kadhimi, is consumed with an uphill battle against powerful Shiite militias unwilling to lay down their arms or accept central government authority.In Baghdad, protests against corruption and militias’ influence continue.Meanwhile, joint operations against ISIS with U.S. The U.S. forces to retreat to non-frontline bases, crucially forcing a halt to U.S.-Iraqi and U.S.-Kurdish operations. Alarming experts is its ability to move freely between eastern Syria and western Iraq, entering villages with relative ease.With health sectors and economies crumbling, analysts are highlighting what they call a “symmetry” between ISIS and the vicious coronavirus. Qassem Soleimani in Baghdad.Not only did the U.S. Security Council was warned last week. report to the Council, “and showing confidence in its ability to increasingly operate in a brazen manner in its core area.”Alarming experts is ISIS’s ability to move freely between eastern Syria and western Iraq – territory that once fell under its “caliphate” – entering towns and villages with relative ease. Africa pushISIS has also used the pandemic   as a diversion to expand further into West Africa and the Sahel, using a network of surrogate groups and affiliates to connect cross-border territories and overwhelm local forces in a way that experts say mirrors the rise of the caliphate in Iraq and Syria in 2014.ISIS affiliate Boko Haram, under the umbrella Islamic State West Africa Province (ISWAP), is expanding territory in Nigeria, Niger, and Chad; ISIS affiliate Islamic State in the Greater Sahara (ISGS) is extending in Niger and Mali.March 23 saw twin attacks by ISIS affiliates killing a combined 160 soldiers on both sides of the Nigerian-Chad border.This April saw the bloody arrival of ISIS’s “central African province,” with affiliates waging their first large-scale attack in Mozambique, massacring 50 villagers on April 7, and the same day killing seven civilians in the Democratic Republic of Congo.With the global preoccupation with COVID-19, West and Sub-Saharan Africa has seen ISIS strategy evolve from “filling the gaps” where international presence was weak to creating connected territories and a public presence in communities and villages.“West African states show much more potential because the conditions are ripe for a bigger presence,” says Mr. ISIS can move freely, control territory, and they can work with locals who do not have the knowledge of their brutality that Iraqis and Syrians have.”Combined with its activities in the Arab world, ISIS’s Africa presence has given it a new hybrid model: an ever-shifting insurgency on the move in Syria and Iraq, and held territory in Africa where militias are able to extract resources, funds, and recruits.“These are opportunities for these terrorist organizations such as the Islamic State to step in and provide alternative services and gain legitimacy in some of these populations,” says Nikita Malik, director of the Centre on Radicalisation and Terrorism at the Henry Jackson Society, a trans-Atlantic think tank based in London.Battle for ideasISIS’s bold re-emergence is not only taking place on the battlefield.In a world consumed with the coronavirus, with economies crumbling, lives halted, and people losing hope for the future, groups such as ISIS are making a pitch for followers, experts say.“You have people out of work, you have isolation, people staying at home and going on the internet and searching for a rationale why this has happened,” says Ms. This Georgia city beat back COVID-19. and analysts’ estimates.“The pandemic came at a time with preexisting conditions on the ground in Iraq and Syria that allowed ISIS to benefit,” says Hassan Hassan, director of the Non-State Actors and Geopolitics program at the Washington-based Center for Global Policy.“Namely, the pandemic came amid already existing political and security issues in Iraq and Syria and a vacuum left behind by the Trump administration,” he adds. No paywall.Three years after the destruction of its so-called caliphate and the dismantling of its organizational leadership by an American-led coalition, ISIS has since March shown renewed strength, staging dozens of attacks in Iraq, Syria, Egypt, and West Africa. )

By Taylor Luck
Special Correspondent
@Taylor_Luck

Three years after the destruction of its so-called caliphate by a United States-led coalition, and with the world distracted by a pandemic, the Islamic State has shown renewed strength, staging dozens of attacks since March in Arab countries and West Africa.Its ranks boast around 10,000 fighters, according to U.N. Malik, noting that “conspiracy theories are increasing [that are] blaming groups and communities for the pandemic.”“It is a toxic mix, and what we might be seeing in the long term are spikes in both extremism and terrorism,” she says.ISIS’s online propaganda has depicted the coronavirus as “divine retribution” against the West and highlighted states’ failures. Under cover of COVID, ISIS is seeking a comeback

Why We Wrote This

Can countries battle two scourges at once?   ISIS is “consolidating in Iraq and the Syrian Arab Republic,” said a U.N. Khalid Mohammed/Reuters

Iraqi security forces are deployed in Tarmiyah, Iraq, north of Baghdad, July 20, 2020, as they conduct a search in the region for ISIS insurgents.
No paywall. Malik says.Editor’s note: As a public service,   all our coronavirus coverage   is free. “What we are seeing is not COVID replacing terrorism concerns, but adding to terrorism concerns,” Ms.

Progress watch: Where dolphins get a second chance at life

Get the Monitor Stories you care about delivered to your inbox.
By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy.

He’s looking forward to “being able to share my culture in the U.S. and connect with other Indigenous people and highlight … Saulo said. “Being the first Aboriginal person to hold the position of an Australian consul-general comes with a huge weight of responsibility but then also a sense of achievement,” Mr. the global Indigenous economy.”SBS Australia, ABC

The imposition of strict Islamist laws in the early 1980s was a major catalyst for Sudan’s long-running civil war, but now, after more than 30 years and the ousting of former President Omar al-Bashir, Sudan is relaxing its most conservative rules. 4. Emirati scientists say the atmospheric observations will be available to the international scientific community. SudanThe Sudanese government has taken a “great first step” toward improving its human rights record with wide-reaching legal reforms, activists say. A new U.N. Saulo has roots in the Wemba Wemba, Jardwadjali, and Gunditjmara nations of western Victoria, and will relocate to Houston at the end of the year. Stunting in children under 5 years old also declined from 47.8% in 2012 to 34.7% in 2019.The Hindu, India Times

MHI/AP

A Japanese H-IIA rocket with United Arab Emirates’ Mars orbiter launches from Tanegashima Space Center in Kagoshima, Japan, on July 20, 2020. IndiaThe number of undernourished people in India has declined by 60 million since 2004, according to the United Nations. AustraliaAustralia appointed Benson Saulo as the country’s first Indigenous consul-general. IndonesiaThe Bali Dolphin Sanctuary is helping rehabilitate previously captive dolphins, potentially offering a model for similar efforts around the globe. It wishes states would pay attention.Both shifts are attributed to economic growth, reduced inequality, and improved access to basic services, such as supermarkets in India’s rural areas. The country has also decriminalized apostasy, or the act of renouncing one’s faith – in this case Islam – an act previously punishable by death. July 28, 2020

By Lindsey McGinnis
Staff Writer
@BylineLindsey

1. To build the Amal spacecraft, the Emiratis partnered with researchers from several U.S. Some say India’s figures are a sign that government efforts to combat starvation, including school lunch programs, are gradually bearing fruit. Successful rehabilitation hinges on the animals’ ability to catch food and relearn other skills they lost in captivity, including the use of sonar to navigate the vast ocean and communicate with other dolphins.To address these challenges, the Dolphin Project – a charity run by dolphin-trainer-turned-activist Ric O’Barry – has partnered with the Bali government and animal rights groups to open what they describe as the world’s first permanent rehabilitation center. Gay sex will no longer be punished by flogging or execution, but still risks prison terms ranging from five years to life.BBC, Reuters3. The law came into effect in July, along with new regulations limiting single-use plastics and plastic foam.Fast Company, Burlington Free Press2. The new legislation is designed to provide more opportunities for drop-off and curbside collection, resources for at-home composting, and support for food rescue and donation efforts. This Georgia city beat back COVID-19. Officials have found that roughly 20% of residents’ trash is food waste, which is a significant source of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas. Amal, meaning “hope,” is expected to reach Mars in February, and will start transmitting data later that year. O’Barry says the Bali center is a model that can be replicated in other places where dolphinariums have closed down.Reuters, World Animal Protection6. A roundup of positive stories to inspire you. In his post in the United States, he will be tasked with strengthening the U.S.-Australia relationship. Mr. The Food Scrap Ban is the country’s first statewide ban on food waste – an ambitious move that lawmakers say is necessary to achieve the state’s goal of diverting 50% of all waste away from landfills. But returning dolphins to the wild is no simple task. Loading… Progress watch: Where dolphins get a second chance at life

Why We Wrote This

This is more than feel-good news – it’s where the world is making concrete progress. United StatesVermont is tackling a “throwaway culture” by banning food waste in trash. United Arab EmiratesThe launch of the United Arab Emirates’ Amal spacecraft marks the first interplanetary mission of the Arab world, once a hub of mathematical and scientific innovation. The prevalence of undernourishment in the general population went from 21.7% in 2004-06 to 14% in 2017-19. The Associated Press

Pepe Arcos/Courtesy of DolphinProject.com

Rocky And Rambo At Bali Dolphin Sanctuary. Mr. More than 3,000 dolphins are in captivity across 336 entertainment venues worldwide, according to a 2019 report by World Animal Protection. The historic appointment comes as Black Lives Matter protests help shed light on Indigenous rights movements in Australia and around the world. Under the revised laws, women no longer need a male relative’s permission to travel with their children. report presents India as a countertrend to growing hunger worldwide, along with similar improvements in China. universities and used Japan’s launching services. Dolphins unable to make the transition can live out their retirement in the sanctuary. The UAE is a newcomer in space development, but the wealthy Gulf nation has already launched three observation satellites into Earth’s orbit, and sent its first astronaut to the International Space Station in late September. 5.

Malaysia court finds ex-PM guilty of fraud. Will he go to jail?

This story was reported by The Associated Press.Editor’s note: As a public service, the Monitor has removed the paywall   for all our coronavirus coverage. It’s free.
By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy.
Najib’s party for support. It wishes states would pay attention.Mr. Najib was found guilty of fraud in the multibillion-dollar looting of the 1MDB state investment fund. Najib had committed the crime from a “position of trust” as prime minister, his final plea, and the need to deter others from committing the same crime.The ruling in the first of his five corruption trials came five months after Mr. Najib from being suspicious of his plundering of the 1MDB fund. Najib to 12 years in jail on one count of abuse of power, 10 years each for three counts of criminal breach of trust, and 10 years each for three counts of money laundering, as well as a fine of 210 million ringgit ($49.4 million). Najib to report to the police twice a month.“This is definitely not the end of the world, because there is a process of appeal,” Mr. But others cautioned the ruling could be overturned as his political party remains in office.Prosecutors earlier said the case had tarnished the country as a kleptocracy and sought a sentence that would remind those in high public office that “no one is above the law.”Mr. Najib’s Malay party returned to government as the biggest bloc in an alliance that took power from the reformist government that ousted Mr. Najib testified he assumed the money was part of a donation by the Saudi royal family arranged by Mr. Najib, as prime minister, was duped by rogue bankers led by Malaysian fugitive financier Low Taek Jho was “too far-fetched” as the two had a close relationship. Low as the mastermind behind the looting of 1MDB and he remains at large.Mr. Najib of all seven charges.The judge said the sentence was “appropriate and proportionate” taking into account that Mr. Chin added.Prosecutors said they expect the appeals process to be completed within a year. The judge debunked that argument in the guilty verdict, finding it an “elaborate but weak fabrication.”Mr. Najib’s second and third trials involving some of the remaining charges are ongoing. Welsh said. Shortly after he took office in 2009, he set up 1MDB to ostensibly accelerate Malaysia’s economic development.But the fund accumulated billions in debt, and U.S. But he raised the bail amount and ordered Mr. Najib had “overarching control” of SRC and failed to rebut allegations that he misappropriated money for his own use.The judge said the defense’s argument that Mr. Malaysia court finds ex-PM guilty of fraud. Oh said the ruling also would strengthen the credibility of current Prime Minister Muhyiddin Yassin, even though he now relies on Mr. The ruling against former Prime Minister Najib Razak could bolster the prosecution’s case in upcoming trials, proving Malaysia’s legal system’s ability to tackle international financial crimes. Najib’s right to appeal. “As to my supporters, I hope they will continue to believe in me and believe in our struggle.”
This Georgia city beat back COVID-19. Loading… Najib’s party is the biggest bloc in the current Malay nationalist alliance that has governed since March with a shaky, wafer-thin majority in parliament.The ruling was “absolutely” good for Malaysia, said analyst Bridget Welsh, honorary research associate with the University of Nottingham Malaysia.”I think that there is a sense of euphoria among the citizens that justice is being served, among the majority of Malaysians,” Ms. Muhyiddin said his government respected the ruling and Mr. Mr. The 1MDB case damaged Malaysia’s reputation, and I think today worked toward restoring that.”Mr. Najib said he was disappointed with the ruling and vowed to fight to the end.Judge Mohamad Nazlan Ghazali sentenced Mr. Low as a guise to keep Mr. Najib’s planned appeal. Najib, who faces a total of 42 charges in five separate trials, has said he was misled by rogue bankers and the case against him is political.”The conviction would serve as a solid foundation for the prosecution in ensuing 1MDB-related trials,” said Oh Ei Sun, a senior fellow with Singapore’s Institute of International Affairs.Mr. Najib asked the court to take into account his achievements during his nine-year tenure and gave an oath that he wasn’t aware of the 42 million ringgit ($9.8 million) channeled into his bank accounts from SRC International, a former unit of 1MDB.Some of Mr. Najib’s bank accounts.The judge   read out an elaborate two-hour ruling that convicted Mr. Najib’s supporters outside the courthouse cried when they learned of the verdict while others chanted “free bossku” and “long live bossku.” The nickname meaning “my boss” was coined for Mr. His wife and several officials from his party and previous government have also been charged with graft related to 1MDB corruption.”People should not really be celebrating now … Najib’s deputy exactly five years ago for speaking out on the 1MDB scandal.Mr. Will he go to jail? Investigators have identified Mr. we know in Malaysia, many of these politically charged cases, once they get to the appeals court, they get reversed,” said James Chin, professor of Asian studies at Australia’s University of Tasmania.”So the fact that we have today’s guilty verdict doesn’t mean things will change. “Let us give space for the legal process to take place to ensure that justice is served,” he said in a statement.During the trial, Mr. Mr. Najib was calm and stone-faced as he became the first Malaysian leader to be convicted,   in what opposition lawmakers hailed as a victory for the people. More than $700 million from the fund allegedly landed in Mr. Najib was accused of using his position to receive a bribe for approving a government guarantee for billions in loans to SRC, committing criminal breach of trust, and accepting proceeds from unlawful activities.Evidence showed a complex trail of ill-gotten money paid for his home renovation, credit card purchases including a Chanel watch bought in Hawaii as a birthday gift for his wife, and disbursements to political parties.The judge agreed with prosecutors on Tuesday that Mr. Najib’s father and uncle were Malaysia’s second and third prime ministers. In the first of five corruption trials, Mr. Najib’s other trials and would signal to the business community that Malaysia’s legal system has strength in tackling international financial crimes. But while his party remains in office the ruling could be overturned, experts warn. Vincent Thian/AP

Former Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak (center) arrives at the courthouse in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, July 28, 2020. Najib will still remain an MP [member of parliament] and we have to wait for the appeal court system,” Mr. “Keep in mind that majority of Malaysians voted [in 2018] for political change, and the 1MDB case was a catalyst in that. Muhyiddin was fired as Mr. Najib will face only up to 12 years in jail.The judge allowed a stay of the jail sentence and fine pending Mr. But he ordered the sentences to run concurrently, meaning that Mr. Najib told a news conference after the sentencing. July 28, 2020

By Eileen Ng
Associated Press

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
A Malaysian court sentenced former Prime Minister Najib Razak to serve 12 years in prison on Tuesday after finding him guilty in the first of several corruption trials linked to the multibillion-dollar looting of the 1MDB state investment fund that brought down his government two years ago.Mr. Najib in his social media campaign to reinvent himself as a working-class leader.Mr. investigators allege that at least $4.5 billion was stolen from it and laundered by Mr. Najib’s associates to finance Hollywood films and buy hotels, a luxury yacht, artwork, jewelry, and other extravagances. Najib’s in 2018 elections.Analysts said the ruling would bolster the prosecution’s case in Mr.

Get the Monitor Stories you care about delivered to your inbox.

In Israel, first hijab-wearing lawmaker hopes to build bridges

Get the Monitor Stories you care about delivered to your inbox.
Over the years she has befriended religious Jewish women, including fellow social activists. She sees a common goal to their joint struggle – an equal place for women in conservative religious and political settings.“I hope we can be a good example of what religious women can do,” she says.

By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy.
“We children took pride in the land and our role. She would sneak under the fence to fill up the family water bottles.“This was my first memory of the government – that it prevented us from having a normal life,” she says.She wishes her children had had a chance to grow up in the village. It’s been a long week, she explains in her low, gentle voice, a week of shuttling between parliamentary committee meetings on the coronavirus and the economy in Jerusalem, and long drives to tend to her ailing mother at a hospital in the Galilee. But just floating the idea seems to be eroding the taboo against it, some observers say. This Georgia city beat back COVID-19. Heidi Levine/Special to The Christian Science Monitor

A view of the village where Iman Khatib Yassin lives. Another breakthrough – she is the first woman elected to the Knesset from Ra’am, a party representing the Southern Islamic Movement, known for its conservative brand of Islam and network of social services.Ms. But when her doctor told her she would not be able to have children she vowed to become observant if she became pregnant. Some men balked, mindful of the taboo against mixed-gender gatherings in traditional Bedouin society. “My national identity is Palestinian, but my civic identity is as an Israeli. But they relented. Khatib Yassin sees political significance in the way Palestinian Arabs in Israel are increasingly returning to their Islamic faith. It was there she first felt the sting of injustice. July 27, 2020

Two ways to read the story

Quick Read
Deep Read ( 4 Min. “There was a pride in working the fields, the fruit you held in your hands was a product of your work,” she recalls. From the age of five she worked the family fields with her mother and her siblings, growing tomatoes, melons, and tobacco. The government confiscated a piece of her family’s land with a well on it. She campaigned especially hard in the Negev desert among Bedouin women, giving speeches in village courtyards to pitch the importance of making their voices as devout Muslim women heard in the corridors of power. I feel it built my personality. I am Israeli in every way. She would return home around 11 p.m.Ms. In the end she decided to run for office in March because she was motivated by the idea of representation itself.“I strongly felt a calling to serve others, I saw running as a chance to open the door to other traditional women. She is the first Islamic headscarf-wearing woman to be elected to the Israeli parliament. But she has been political since childhood, when the Israeli government confiscated some of her family’s land.She was elected to the Knesset in March, on a list representing the descendants of Palestinian Arabs who stayed in Israel when the state was created in 1948, instead of becoming refugees. Heidi Levine/Special to The Christian Science Monitor

Iman Khatib Yassin with her daughter Rose (r.) at their home near Nazareth. From early on I had an understanding that not everything comes easily, but that there is worth in what you do and what you contribute.”She was not always religious, she explains. Rose, her daughter, 24, acted as her driver.She recalls a speech to a group of men and women when someone proposed a photo. But her social welfare agenda transcends ethnic boundaries, and so do the friendships she has struck up with religious Jewish women.“I hope we can be a good example of what religious women can do,” she says. She knows that the scarf, or hijab, is what people will see first. But she wants to make the voices of devout Muslim women heard in the corridors of power, and bring her long experience of community activism to the Knesset.Ms. Khatib Yassin, a middle-aged mother of four, became religious out of gratitude for her first child’s birth after her doctor had told her she was infertile. But even though I ran I still didn’t think I had any chance of actually getting into the Knesset,” she says.She scraped in, 15th on the Joint List, a coalition of parties representing the descendants of the Palestinian Arabs who stayed in Israel in 1948 when the state was created as a Jewish homeland. During the election campaign the party said it was ready to join a government under the right conditions.The current politically polarized climate, in which the right-wing establishment paints the Arab electorate as disloyal and dangerous, makes the likelihood of a such an outcome low. A woman pulled her aside to whisper, “Iman, we are breaking barriers.”No Arab party has ever joined an Israeli governing coalition, but the Joint List is demanding to take part in decision-making, especially on budget allocations and investment in Arab towns, and on issues that disproportionately impact Palestinian citizens of Israel such as home demolitions, rising crime levels, and civil rights. Khatib Yassin’s rise, and that of the Joint List, is part of a larger story of the social and economic integration of Arab citizens   – or Palestinians as many call themselves   – into Israeli society. Grateful for her first pregnancy, she became a devout Muslim.Ms. In Israel, first hijab-wearing lawmaker hopes to build bridges

Why We Wrote This

New Israeli Knesset member Iman Khatib Yassin, a devout Muslim, knows her hijab is eye-catching. A social worker and community center director, she had long turned down suggestions that she enter politics. “We are getting stronger all the time.” Palestinian Arab turnout was 67% in the last elections, the highest in more than 20 years.Political since childhood, religious since childbirthMs. Khatib Yassin. She would leave her home at 6 a.m., returning after midnight. Heidi Levine/Special to The Christian Science Monitor

Arab Israeli politician Iman Khatib Yassin at her home in Yafa an-Naseriyye, outside Nazareth. The Joint List won 15 seats, which made it the third largest party in Israel and made Ms. Loading… Khatib Yassin.Her political awareness dates back to childhood. Rose acted as her mother’s driver during the recent Israeli election campaign. It wishes states would pay attention.Breaking barriersShe knows the hijab, the Islamic headscarf, is what people will see first, but she hopes to make her mark, she says, as a feminist with a social welfare agenda that will transcend ethnic boundaries to help all of those marginalized and in need.“I believe we need to push and invest and if we do, ultimately that work will pay off,” says Ms. I was born here, grew up here, and became part of this society,” says Ms. “We are aware of the realities here, but we in the Joint List decided we want to be part of the political game,” says Ms. Khatib Yassin still seems surprised that she’s a member of the Knesset, Israel’s parliament, more than   four months after being elected. Palestinian Arab citizens of Israel are playing an increasingly active role in Israeli politics. Yafa an-Naseriyye, Israel
In her hilltop village home outside Nazareth, Iman Khatib Yassin, one of Israel’s newest lawmakers, sinks into a chair in her living room, furnished with plush cream-colored couches and Persian rugs.Wearing a pale green   hijab headscarf and rose-colored cardigan, she clasps her hands on the lap of her floor-skimming dress. But before she became religious, or political, she was a feminist motivated against injustice. Khatib Yassin the first hijab-wearing Muslim woman to be elected to parliament in the history of Israel. It is a salve to soothe the pain of the suspicion they face, she believes. Others fled or were expelled, settling as refugees in Egypt, Jordan, and Lebanon. Khatib Yassin, a middle-aged mother of four, is credited with helping get the Arab women’s vote out in the March elections. Khatib Yassin, the daughter of farmers with little education who pushed her and her siblings to go to university. )

By Dina Kraft
Correspondent

Iman Khatib Yassin is a groundbreaker, the first woman wearing an Islamic headscarf to be elected to Israel’s parliament. And she has a message for those Jewish Israelis   who tell her that that this will never happen.

Sterilized pebbles and tracking bracelets: Downsized hajj begins

Get the Monitor Stories you care about delivered to your inbox.
By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy.

Saudi Ministry of Media/AP

Pilgrims arrive to King Abdulaziz Airport for the hajj pilgrimage to Mecca, in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, July 25, 2020. Ms. Daud said she is part of a group of about 10 Malaysian and Singaporean pilgrims connecting online and sharing tips and religious exercises to keep busy.The Saudi government is covering the expenses of all pilgrims this year, providing them with meals, hotel accommodation, transportation, and health care. Pebbles for casting away evil that are usually picked up by pilgrims along hajj routes will be sterilized and bagged before being distributed to the pilgrims.Pilgrims are also bringing their own prayer rugs and will be required to pray at a distance from one another, rather than packed shoulder-to-shoulder. The government is paying for participants’ meals, accommodation, transportation, and health care. It’s a stark departure from previous years, when some 2 million pilgrims from more than 160 countries flocked to Mecca for the spiritual rituals, mostly from across Asia and Africa.Although the hajj often draws all age groups, pilgrims this year were required to be between the ages of 20 and 50, and in good health.The physically demanding rituals of the hajj offer a profound experience for Muslims, with the faithful often weeping, their palms stretched toward the sky, in prayer and repentance. Two-thirds of those pilgrims will be from among foreign residents in Saudi Arabia and one-third will be Saudi citizens.The kingdom has one of the Mideast’s largest outbreaks of the coronavirus, with more than 266,000 reported infections, including 2,733 deaths.Fatin Daud, a Malaysian studying Arabic in Saudi Arabia, was among the select few whose application for hajj was approved. It wishes states would pay attention.After that, Ms. After her selection, Saudi Health Ministry officials came to her home and tested her for the COVID-19 virus. Loading… The hajj is required of all able-bodied Muslims once in a lifetime.This year, pilgrims must wear face masks and will only be able to drink holy water from the Zamzam well in Mecca that has been prepackaged in plastic bottles. This Georgia city beat back COVID-19. Sterilized pebbles and tracking bracelets: Downsized hajj begins

Up to 10,000 people residing in Saudi Arabia have been approved to perform this year’s adapted pilgrimage, which usually attracts millions of Muslims from around the world. Normally, the hajj can cost thousands of dollars for pilgrims who save a lifetime for the journey. It felt surreal because I was not expecting to get it,” she said of her excitement when she found out she was selected. The hajj often draws all age groups, but participants this year were required to be between the ages of 20 and 50, and in good health. July 27, 2020

By Aya Batrawy
Associated Press

Dubai, United Arab Emirates
Muslim pilgrims have started arriving in Mecca for a drastically scaled-down hajj as Saudi authorities balance the kingdom’s oversight of one of Islam’s key pillars and the safety of visitors in the face of a global pandemic.The hajj, which begins on Wednesday, normally draws around 2.5 million people for five intense days of worship in one of the world’s largest gatherings of people from around the world.This year, Saudi Arabia’s Hajj Ministry has said between 1,000 and 10,000 people already residing in the kingdom will be allowed to perform the pilgrimage. It also generates billions of dollars in revenue each year for Saudi Arabia.Saudi kings have for generations assumed titles as custodians of Islam’s holiest sites, and their oversight of the hajj is a source of prestige and influence among Muslims globally. Daud was moved to a hotel in Mecca, where she remains in self-isolation, still wearing the electronic wristband. Saudi Arabia has never canceled the hajj in the nearly 90 years since the country was founded.For the first time in Saudi history, no pilgrims from abroad were permitted to take part in the hajj due to concerns about the coronavirus and overcrowding. Daud said she’s praying for the end of COVID-19 and for unity among Muslims around the world.“I am confident that safety measures are being taken and that the only thing that we need to do as pilgrims is follow instructions, and try our best to support each other,” she said.While self-isolating has been emotionally challenging, Ms. A large box of food is delivered to her hotel room three times a day as she prepares to begin the hajj.“It was unbelievable. She was then given an electronic bracelet that monitors her movement and told to quarantine for several days at home.
It’s free. This story was reported by The Associated Press.Editor’s note: As a public service, the Monitor has removed the paywall   for all our coronavirus coverage.

Monday Sunrise Briefing: Do federal agents make cities safer?

Welcome to your Monday, July 27, 2020, sunrise briefing. Here are three news events from this past weekend (while you may have been jet-skiing, out for a picnic, and enjoying an offline life). winds of Hurricane Hanna this weekend, leaving about 150,000 homes without power. Why We Wrote This

Good morning! Thursday, July 30Mars, again. cities that have seen a spike in violent crimes. Hatfield United States Courthouse Saturday, July 25, 2020, in Portland, Ore. First day of the annual Muslim pilgrimage, held under unprecedented restrictions and with no foreign pilgrims allowed because of the coronavirus outbreak.Wednesday, July 29Honoring John Lewis. The show itself won’t be until September. You can probably guess where the $5 in tooth-fairy money went.Hidden gemStart your week with a recent story that inspired Monitor readers:99 days, 4 lives, 1 pandemic: South Africa in lockdownSneak previewIn tonight’s Daily Edition, watch for our profile of   Iman Khatib-Yasin,   the first hijab-wearing Muslim woman to be elected to Israel’s parliament. Amid signs of a struggling economy, he’s likely to announce steps to help the economy, including a cut in interest rates. Men’s pro-basketballs resumes play with 22 teams (out of 30) in Orlando. She’s had to enlist classmates, family and friends to help her make more than 900 bracelets for donors (and she includes a thank you note with a drawing of an elephant). with Regis and Kelly” (2001 – 2011) and as game show host on “Who Wants to Be a Millianare.” Philbin’s question to contestants,“Is that your final answer?” became a national catchphrase. It will be the first major awards show held since the coronavirus pandemic was declared. Monday Sunrise Briefing: Do federal agents make cities safer? She’s raised more than $216,000 For the zoo. The unrest is in response to what residents see as Moscow usurping their local judicial system and simmering discontent with President Vladimir Putin.2. Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell is scheduled to hold a press conference. Most of the peaceful protests were described as opposing federal agents posted in Portland, Oregon. Her birthday isn’t until next month, but this year the giving started early. From Seattle to Baltimore buildings and vehicles were damaged. calls Andy’s ability to turn $5 into $215,000 “a gift.” “We’ve never seen anything like it,” he told NPR.The Oakland Zoo plans to reopen on July 29. Nominations for the 72nd Emmy Awards are announced. This weekend marked the passing of two entertainment giants: Olivia de Havilland and Regis Philbin. Church to the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, Sunday, July 26, 2020. Look AheadTuesday, July 28
This Georgia city beat back COVID-19. that became known as   the “De Havilland law.”Philbin was one of television’s most durable and endearing personalities. Congressman John Lewis, a pioneer of the civil rights movement, travels in a procession from Brown Chapel A.M.E. Some 20 players did not travel with teams to the “bubble” after testing positive for the virus.Friday, July 31Federal help ends. Former Chicago mayor Rahm Emanuel said the president is trying to “entice those elements, small elements, to become the face of legitimate protests.” Former N.J. Meanwhile, Hurricane Douglas, another Category 1 storm, passed close to Hawaii on Sunday. Gov. Also, what to look for in the news this week. Gov. Each year on her birthday, she asks people to donate to a charity instead of giving her a present. Kelly Soulard announced on Facebook that her daughter had donated $5 as seed money to raise $200 to help the zoo. A lie-in-state service is scheduled in Atlanta, followed by a funeral service Thursday.Economic boost? The CARES (The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security)   Act – which allotted $600 weekly to unemployment benefits during the pandemic – expires Friday. AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez

Demonstrators push on a fence as tear gas is deployed during a Black Lives Matter protest at the Mark O. It wishes states would pay attention.The best TV shows. The robotic scientist also will carry the Ingenuity Mars Helicopter, the first attempt at powered, controlled flight on another planet.The NBA returns. Entertainment giants. Congress is negotiating another economic stimulus package. It will also do climate and geology research to pave the way for human exploration of the Red Planet. Chris Christie said on ABC’s “This Week,” that President Trump is right to send in federal agents “if the mayors of those towns are too politically timid to address people who are defacing and destroying their cities,”In Russia, the tension between local and national authorities brought   tens of thousands of people into the streets of the Russian city of Khabarovsk Saturday to protest the arrest of a regional governor. First hurricane test.   Oakland Zoo’s president, Dr. The Hajj begins. Loading… Generosity Watch

Courtesy of Kelly Soulard

Six-year-old Andy Soulard shows off one of the bracelets she makes for each person who donates $25 or more to the Oakland Zoo. And Andy just lost another tooth. Joel Parrott. De Havilland was perhaps best known for her role in the Civil War film “Gone With the Wind.” But the two-time Oscar winner was also a labor activist, who effectively challenged Hollywood’s studio system, which often locked actors into long-term, punitive labor contracts. Hanna was the first big   test of coastal state plans to handle an emergency during the pandemic. Her parents, reports, the East Bay Times, suggested she could   donate the $5 to her “birthday charity.”   When the Soulard family learned that the Oakland Zoo might have to close permanently, due to the lost revenue during the pandemic, the zoo officially became Andy’s birthday charity. South Texas was battered by rain, an unusually strong storm surge, and the 90 m.p.h. And Andy sweetened the deal by offering to make a bracelet for anyone donating $25 or more.Andy’s generosity has been contagious. 3. He was most recently known for the morning talk show,“Live! She won a lawsuit against Warner Bros. Greg Abbott said Saturday that some people in need of shelter would be given hotel rooms to keep them apart from others. This weekend, violence erupted in half-a-dozen U.S. NASA plans to launch the   Mars 2020 Perseverance rover, designed to search for evidence of ancient microbial life. Andy Soulard is being raised to be generous. This past week, President Trump unveiled “Operation LeGend,” to send federal agents to other U.S. cities. July 27, 2020

By David Clark Scott
Audience Engagement Editor
@davidclarkscott

It’s a pattern we’ve seen sporadically for two months: large peaceful protests against racial injustice are followed by acts of vandalism and violence by fringe players. The genial and relatable Philbin clocked more than 15,000 hours on the air, setting the Guinness Book World Record for the most broadcast hours logged by a TV personality. On June 30, she lost a tooth, and the next day the six-year-old found a $5 bill under her pillow. REUTERS/Christopher Aluka Berry

Honoring John Lewis: The casket of late U.S.
Get the Monitor Stories you care about delivered to your inbox.
By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy.

Finally, check out the Monitor’s selected stories from Friday’s subscription-only Daily Edition:
99 days, 4 lives, 1 pandemic: South Africa in lockdown

The feds take their Portland approach on the road. Editor’s note: As a public service,   all our   coronavirus coverage   is free. No paywall.This is a beta test – an experiment with an early Monday news update. How George Floyd and #BlackLivesMatter sparked a street art revival

The Warsaw Ghetto curbed an epidemic. Scientists now say they know how. Please give us your feedback via the link below and let us know what you think. Three questions. Thank you!

Why tens of thousands of Russians are protesting in the streets

If that was the plan, it hasn’t worked.Mr. It wishes states would pay attention.“We had enough,” said protester Anastasia Schegorina. Furgal has been in a Moscow jail since July 9 and protesters demand that he stand trial at home. He has denied the charges, which date to his time as a businessman with interests focusing on timber and metals.A lawmaker on the nationalist Liberal Democratic Party ticket, Mr. Why tens of thousands of Russians are protesting in the streets

Some 4,000 miles from Moscow, protesters in Khabarovsk see the charges against their governor as political and demand that he stand trial at home. Furgal and other detainees protested the city’s ban on rallies due to the pandemic.Authorities suspect Mr. “I think people take to the streets because their vote in the 2018 election was taken away.”Unlike Moscow, where police usually move quickly to disperse unsanctioned opposition protests, authorities haven’t interfered with the unauthorized demonstrations in Khabarovsk, apparently expecting them to fizzle out in the city 3,800 miles east of the Russian capital.But daily protests, peaking at weekends, have gone on for two weeks, reflecting anger against what residents see as Moscow’s disrespect of their choice for governor and simmering discontent with Mr. Furgal won the 2018 gubernatorial election even though he had refrained from campaigning and publicly supported his Kremlin-backed rival.His victory was a humiliating setback to the main Kremlin party, United Russia, which also lost its control over the regional legislature. Protesters in Khabarovsk see the charges against Mr. He would have had a normal life.”Mikhail Degtyaryov, a federal lawmaker whom Mr. Furgal, is also a member of the Liberal-Democratic Party – a choice that was apparently intended to assuage local anger. “If we hadn’t elected him, he would have been living quietly with his family and working at the State Duma. Local officials’ attempts to discourage people from joining the demonstrations by warning about the risk of coronavirus infection have been unsuccessful. Putin.Demonstrations were also held in other cities of the Far East, and police didn’t intervene. Loading… Putin’s rule. July 26, 2020

By Yulia Khorovenkova and Vladimir Isachenkov
Associated Press

Khabarosvsk, Russia
Tens of thousands of people marched Saturday across Russia’s Far East city of Khabarovsk on the border with China to protest the arrest of the regional governor on murder charges, continuing a two-week wave of protests that has challenged the Kremlin.Sergei Furgal has been in a Moscow jail since his arrest on July 9, and Russian President Vladimir Putin has named an acting successor. During his time in office, Mr. This Georgia city beat back COVID-19. Furgal of involvement in several murders of businessmen in 2004 and 2005. Furgal and denouncing Mr. Mr. Furgal earned a reputation as a “people’s governor,” cutting his own salary, ordering the sale of an expensive yacht that the previous administration had bought, and offering new benefits to residents.“We want to protect Furgal,” said Evgenia Selina, who joined Saturday’s protest. “We elected the governor and we want to be heard and decide ourselves what to do with him. Bring him here, and a fair and open trial will decide whether to convict him or not.”Protesters chanted “Freedom!” and “Russia, wake up!” and carried placards voicing support for Mr. Putin named Monday to succeed Mr. Igor Volkov/AP

A man holds a poster reading "Putinism" during a protest in support of Sergei Furgal, the governor of the Khabarovsk region, in Khabarovsk, Russia, July 25, 2020. Degtyaryov, who has refrained from facing the protesters, left the city on Saturday for an inspection trip across the region. Furgal as unsubstantiated and demand that he stand trial at home.“People are offended,” said protester Dmitry Kachalin. But in Moscow, police briefly detained several dozen activists who attempted to stage pickets in support of Mr.

Get the Monitor Stories you care about delivered to your inbox.

This story was reported by The Associated Press.Editor’s note: As a public service, the Monitor has removed the paywall   for all our coronavirus coverage. It’s free.

By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy.

99 days, 4 lives, 1 pandemic: South Africa in lockdown

Get the Monitor Stories you care about delivered to your inbox.

He met with a group of clinicians working on a reliable rapid test. The leaders of two of the most populous provinces would fall ill. No two individuals’ experiences are the same. It had been useful as a young father and as an AIDS researcher, and it was particularly helpful now, as he tried to figure out how South Africa would survive what the country’s president had called “the gravest crisis in the history of our democracy.”But on the morning of July 3, the chair of South Africa’s Ministerial Advisory Committee on COVID19 – the man dubbed “South Africa’s Dr.  
Their days are all distinct in a country that is staggeringly diverse, and unequal. And in the inky darkness outside Mr. In the coastal city of Durban, meanwhile, the head of the government’s coronavirus task force snuck a few extra minutes in bed, bracing himself against the day of Zoom meetings to come.And in Katlehong, Mr. So instead they made us fear the police instead.”Mr. Mabuza had so many customers he’d given food to on credit that he’d mostly given up hoping they’d pay him back.By the time dawn cracked over his little shop that morning, at least 2,952 South Africans had died. Karim’s day had turned, as it often did, into a parade of Zoom meetings. Lamola-Larufi says.It gave her purpose to do this work, but it was also heavy, and she’d long ago learned that if she didn’t find ways to escape sometimes, it might crush her.So her family had started a tradition. Families struggled to eat. “And we really dance,” she says.   “I’m trying to stop other people’s stories from ending like hers,” Ms. At their care centers, Ms. Mabuza, life continued. She missed her friends, she said. Mabuza had developed a theory about why almost no one in Katlehong wore a mask.   Anyway, in Katlehong, a settlement of small, tidy houses and tin shacks, few people knew anyone who’d actually fallen ill. She never had.In October 2018, she and her daughters moved into a concrete room at the backyard of a nicer house. And his studies solidified a basic truth of apartheid South Africa: to be Black and poor was, very often, a death sentence. When I asked to speak to her, they said she couldn’t talk because of the ventilator. Many were simply stuck at home with their abusers, unable to find a way out. That was just barely enough to buy groceries and pay rent – as long as no one needed medicine or new clothes that month.But when she woke up at 7:30 on July 3, her old life felt enviable. And when she died, there wasn’t a funeral,” he says of his friend and colleague, the AIDS researcher Gita Ramjee. Mabuza had charted the pandemic’s course by the purchases his customers made. “How else can you show you don’t have it except to be unmasked and unbothered?” he reasoned. “We were out at 3 a.m. I saw that we are going to struggle because of this thing,” she says.This wasn’t the first time Ms. Now what?But there weren’t many good days anymore. That is, if they had any money left at all. Police and soldiers meted out violence on people who violated the lockdown rules.Now, three months in, the lockdown had eased but there were new crises. This could be the one and only time when no one was going to ask what they were wearing, or if they had been drinking the night it happened.“You never stop a woman who wants to talk to you from talking,” she says. Now, there weren’t many people who needed to be up that early. Restaurants, hairdressers, and casinos reopened. “Or singers.” Or anything else, really, so long as they had a choice in the matter. “That’s how the cat and mouse game started,” he says. No early morning interview with a radio talk show host or morning news show.  These are their stories. Johannesburg
On the morning of Friday July 3rd
, the 99th   day of South Africa’s coronavirus lockdown, Bongani Mabuza rose before dawn to open the small corner store at the front of his property in the Johannesburg township of Katlehong.The winter air was singed from controlled burns of the prairie that surrounded the city. The pandemic’s worst damage had come instead from hunger, and from the police.In the early days of the lockdown, Mr. For Sindisiwe Nokulunga Maseko, the normal everyone was always asking Dr. Rajesh Jantilal/AFP/Getty Images

Salim Abdool Karim, the chair of South Africa’s Ministerial Advisory Committee on COVID-19 and the man often dubbed “South Africa’s Dr. A house where she could get some quiet. Lamola-Larufi arrived home spent. Indeed, since she’d first arrived in Johannesburg in 2014, as a 19-year-old with an infant daughter, she’d never been more than a few steps ahead of calamity. Mabuza had watched as cops and soldiers in sand-colored fatigues marched down the street, guns swinging. The head of the country’s coronavirus task force lingered in bed a few extra minutes, relieved there was no early-morning interview or Zoom call for a change. Women couldn’t escape their abusers. How do you make sense of that? Maseko preferred to be alone, watching Indian soap operas. By noon, so many customers had come in with large bills that Mr. At 9:15 a.m., as Ms. When the lockdown started, for Ms. He listened as soldiers and barked humiliating orders: 50 push-ups. Mabuza was out of change.Yet he felt deeply uneasy. And then the five of them pushed back a couch in their living room and danced. A rare good day, by Mr. A store owner leaned over his counter, wondering if today would be one of the increasingly rare good days – days when people chatted, bought novelties, and didn’t count their change. Mabuza stepped behind the counter of the African Accent Spaza Shop: the business he had named in defiance of the white teachers who told him he spoke English well, except for his “African accent.” He leaned forward, watching the world outside his doors come slowly to life.MorningDr. And nine in 10 women in Rustenburg who experienced sexual violence never reported it to police in the first place.“The system often fails them so it’s even more important that we do not,” Ms. Ryan Lenora Brown/The Christian Science Monitor

Sindisiwe Maseko cleans a community space in her neighborhood in eastern Johannesburg in early July. “Until our bodies are just lightness.”On day 99, as she arrived home, she had that to look forward to.In the coming weeks, South Africa’s case numbers would double, climbing towards a half million. Lamola-Larufi’s nurses gathered the forensic evidence of those crimes, collecting fluids and documenting the crime scene mapped onto the woman’s body – purple bruises, black eyes, broken bones. Tens of thousands were sick. So Mr. Truth be told, Ms. Salim Abdool Karim had always been an early riser, and also a night owl. Now, most of the time, people came in with their eyes cast low, clutching the exact change they needed for a loaf of bread. Maseko couldn’t afford to buy her daughter those books. On those days, customers cracked jokes, whispered gossip, and didn’t ask if he knew anyone who’d died of the coronavirus. That worried Ms. Had they been crying? “The experience of growing up under apartheid is inextricably linked to my choice to become a doctor, and all of the work I have done since,” he says.Health was justice. 99 days, 4 lives, 1 pandemic: South Africa in lockdown

Why We Wrote This

The pandemic has exacerbated divides and deepened inequalities. Maseko had lived on the edge. People in the suburbs began to call their housekeepers and gardeners again. It was two days before a full moon, and it hung low and heavy in the night sky.Since the pandemic started, 7-year-old Londiwe’s teachers had sent weekly assignments for her to complete in her workbooks. And it wasn’t lost on her that she could have grown up to be one of those walking through the doors of her centers every day. When would the peak arrive?They all seemed to boil down to one thing: When will life be normal again?It was a question Dr. Lamola-Larufi. One hundred miles to the north, a forensic nurse woke her three boys, her heart aching as she promised herself that she wouldn’t touch them again until this crisis was over. In Rustenburg, Ms. On her walk to work that morning, she had noticed a group of people loitering in a small park. Few of the customers wore masks. The day before, two of the clinics in the city where she helped oversee sexual and gender-based violence units had been forced to close temporarily after several members of their staffs tested positive for COVID-19. Every Saturday, she, her husband, and their three adolescent boys all picked a song. Or they used their last few Rand to buy vouchers for a popular cell phone gambling app. For the first time in her life, she felt like she’d made something of herself.  
In the arid northwest, a forensic nurse woke her three boys, her heart aching that she couldn’t touch them. Then, as now, the disease was a humiliation. So why now had they become so committed to doing their job?“At a point, coronavirus stopped being the enemy, and instead it became the police,” he says. His ability to get through the day on four hours of sleep had served him well as a med student and a young scientist. Lamola-Larufi told her teams. Fauci,” has long been both a scientist and an activist. He himself rarely did either. Karim clicked “leave meeting” on his final Zoom call of the day, and prepared at last to head home.Evening“Did you do your school work?” Ms. Karim says. Government knew we wouldn’t fear this unknown disease we’d never seen. Spaza shops are small convenience stores, often operating in private homes. As countries across Europe and Asia began a cautious return to normal life, South Africa’s case curve was bending in the other direction, vying with countries like the United States, Brazil, India, and Mexico on the table of the world’s worst outbreaks. No paywall. On the other side of town, a single mother rose to make breakfast for herself and her young daughter before heading out to a cleaning job. “I didn’t finish school, so I like practicing my English,” she says. The pandemic’s global centers were shifting south, toward deeply unequal countries where it pulled apart the cracks in already battered public health systems.And yet, all around Mr. In early June, with the economy cratering, South Africa’s government had slackened the rules of its lockdown. Then came a Zoom call with a task force looking into virus transmission on minibuses – the cramped, rickety vans that carried most commuters to work. In Rustenburg, a city flanked by platinum mines in South Africa’s arid northwest, an estimated one in four women had been raped. They paid in large bills and didn’t count the change. Mabuza’s gate, the street was quiet. he decided to linger in bed a few extra minutes, covers pulled tight against the chilly Durban morning.Like nearly everywhere in the world, the previous 98 days had been grueling. In late March, with case numbers still in the triple digits, the country had begun one of the world’s strictest lockdowns, which forbade even outdoor exercise and the sale of tobacco and alcohol. Karim about had never been easy. And it was underscored when he arrived, in 1978, at South Africa’s only medical school for “non-white” doctors.“As soon as you got there, you got roped into the struggle against apartheid,” Dr. Courtesy of Siyathuthuka Media

Cecilia Lamola-Larufi, who helps manage Doctors Without Borders’ centers for victims of sexual assault and gender-based violence in Rustenburg, South Africa, organizes kits for collecting evidence at a clinic. Karim about them on nearly a daily basis.When would the days-long backlog of coronavirus tests be cleared? Instead, he saw people slammed against the ground. Heather Mason

Bongani Mabuza and his wife, Sibongile Motlhasedi, stand behind the counter at their African Accents Spaza Shop in Katlehong Township. Others made it to the care center but struggled to explain what had happened. On April 14, 2018, he was one of the conveners of the ‘March for Science’ in the city of Durban. In the best of times, the 25-year-old single mother had pulled in around $300 USD a month from two cleaning jobs and a small government assistance check. His spaza – a local name for this type of store   – served bread and Coke and hot sandwiches to a steady stream of customers in blue workmen’s overalls and security guard uniforms heading to jobs in the city. And she was bored of being stuck at home. But Ms. Maseko did any job that came along – sweeping streets, installing electrical wiring, cleaning houses. Fauci” – had a rare reprieve. painting ‘FREE MANDELA’ on bridges before our lectures.”When he graduated, Dr. “That’s when I realized that this disease doesn’t only kill, it kills in a way that doesn’t allow people to say goodbye, or to grieve.”That was the world he wanted back. Lamola-Larufi knew, this might be the only moment in the aftermath of their assault that they simply felt heard. But in South Africa, as anywhere, our experiences are bound by common threads: fatigue, love, uncertainty, resolve. Now, a new generation of the city’s fortune-seekers had crowded in, tapping an illegal electricity connection from the nearby city wires and drawing water from an outdoor tap.Back then, Ms. But the society it entered did.He’d known that since he was a child, growing up in an Indian township wedged between a middle-class white suburb and a rundown African one on the edge of Durban. At the country’s largest airport, two people would die in a shootout between police and criminals trying to steal a shipment of face masks. That she and her girls were going to be ok. But by far their most important role was something less tangible.For many of the women who walked through their doors, Ms. Ms. South Africa’s lockdown had been only five days old when, on March 31, he had first lost someone to the disease.“When I went to see her in the hospital, they wouldn’t let me in. And as the sun slunk low, Dr. I like to see another part of the world.”Sometimes on nights like this, she imagined herself living in a house she used to clean, before the lockdown, which had so many rooms she couldn’t tidy them all in a single day. “You never tell them, ‘Ok, I’ve heard enough.’”Her team knew the statistics: Only around 8% of rape cases reported to police ended in a conviction. Justice required good health. were one of his busiest times. Like AIDS or measles or any of the other infectious diseases Dr. When she looped back in the afternoon, many were still there, slumping dejected on the lawns and benches.It wasn’t lost on her that she could have grown up to be one of those women. Six feet away, behind surgical masks, the nurses and social workers struggled to read the only part of the women’s faces they could see – their eyes. America has bungled the pandemic. Ryan Lenora Brown/The Christian Science Monitor

Sindisiwe Maseko, a single mother in Johannesburg, cannot afford to buy her daughter’s school workbooks, so she hand-copies the pages into a notebook she bought at the grocery store. But together, they paint a picture of what South Africa’s president has called “the gravest crisis in the history of our democracy.” And they speak to experiences most of us have felt in the past few months, from fear to fortitude. In Durban, Dr. Were they afraid?At a distance, sometimes, it was hard to tell.AfternoonAt African Accent, the morning had been busy. )

By Ryan Lenora Brown
Staff writer
@ryanlenorabrown

On the morning of July 3, 2020, South Africans woke up and began another day in lockdown – the 99th day, to be precise. And even now, most days, that seemed scarier than a virus. Now, her only steady work was a cleaning gig at a community center down the road, which paid $10 a week for three two-hour shifts.It was better than nothing. They were desperately important to keep the country running. Heather Mason

Bongani Mabuza and his wife, Sibongile Motlhasedi, owners of the African Accent Spaza Shop, stand outside their shop in Katlehong Township east of Johannesburg. On the good days, they bought candy bars and energy drinks. Karim had studied in his life, the coronavirus itself did not discriminate. It was small and dark, and they had to cross the yard to get to the bathroom or kitchen, but it was theirs. Frog-hop to the end of the block.“Normally in the township when you call the police, they take hours to come,” he says. Millions had lost their jobs. Before COVID-19 hit South Africa, 5 to 7 a.m. And when that conversation was done, he had another about one of the most fraught questions globally – what to do about schools.That problem, like every other he faced related to COVID-19, stood at the intersection of public health and social justice: The kids most at risk from COVID-19 were also the most at risk of falling behind in their education.That was how it almost always went with epidemics. It made you part of this thing that had already destroyed so many lives in your community. So she’d asked another parent to send her photos of the pages by WhatsApp, and then she copied the text and images carefully into a notebook she’d bought at the grocery store. Mr. He was five years old the first time he saw a dead body lying in the road on his way home from school, not far from where his shop now stood.He knew what the people brought to preserve order were capable of. Karim went into medical research. Maseko was too.Their concrete room felt like an igloo on winter nights, and in the main house, there was always so much noise – babies shrieking and oil frying and soap operas blaring from the small TV. Maseko asked her older daughter as the sun collapsed behind the horizon, leaving Johannesburg in a chilly winter darkness. That bought time, but it also created new catastrophes. Three months into the lockdown, so many South Africans had lost their jobs that there were more people unemployed than still formally working.For 99 days, Mr. And because her jobs had been informal – paid under the table, in cash – she wasn’t eligible for unemployment.“I was angry. Was public transportation safe? Maseko, like the other million women in South Africa who work as housekeepers, that spelled an immediate end to her work. “I want them to become doctors,” she said. And so now, a month later, many Katlehong residents had been paid for the first time in a long time. Editor’s note: As a public service,   all our coronavirus coverage   is free. Mabuza had seen violence like this before, in the dying years of apartheid, as political killings – and equally brutal police reaction – gripped Katlehong. July 24, 2020

Two ways to read the story

Quick Read
Deep Read ( 14 Min. And a single mother in Johannesburg rose to make breakfast for her daughter before heading to the only job she had left: a few hours of cleaning, for $10 a week. “I like the dance. Loading… EDUCATION & ATTITUDE CREATE OPPORTUNITY, its cover read in bold letters.Sometimes Ms. Journalists, ministers, even the president, grilled Dr. In those first years, she’d made her tiny budget work by squatting rent-free with her sister and her sister’s two young children in a room in an abandoned house on the eastern edge of the city. It was the kind of sprawling old building that a hundred years ago might have been owned by one of the well-to-do white families who’d made their fortune in Johannesburg’s gold mining camps. So at 6 a.m. Karim wanted an answer to as much as anyone. It didn’t really matter what she was doing, as long as her girls – now there were two – had something to eat and money for school uniforms. Maseko struggled to explain Londiwe’s assignments to her. The job, which pays about $10 a week for three two-hour shifts, is her only steady work since South Africa’s coronavirus lockdown began in late March. That was a hard thing to explain, he thought, unless you’d been in this part of the world as another deadly disease made its rounds: HIV. “People were being brutalized into staying home, and government was saying it was for their own safety. She’d left school in tenth grade, when her family couldn’t afford the $20 to buy a new uniform. Maseko was mopping the community center floor in Johannesburg, Cecilia Lamola-Larufi was trying to figure out how to manage her day’s first crisis.In the offices of the medical charity Doctors Without Borders in the city of Rustenburg, she scrolled through her emails while her phone lit up again and again. Since the country’s coronavirus lockdown began in late March, many victims have struggled to access their services. The evidence they collected, she reminded them, “gives [these women] a voice.”But during the lockdown, that had been harder than ever. Since the start of the coronavirus lockdown, many of their customers have not been able to afford their usual purchases. Mabuza’s count. It had been so long now since she’d done math problems or memorized English grammar rules.Anyway, Londiwe was struggling to focus.   A decade ago, her younger sister’s partner had stabbed her to death, leaving behind their daughters, ages 2 and 6 weeks. When his own store had been robbed a few years earlier, he’d found the perpetrators before the police had the chance. They were waiting for cars to stop and ask for help with a small job – ironing, painting. When they found someone on the road, there was rarely a conversation about what rule they’d broken.

No paywall. For now, Ms. Lamola-Larufi was thinking ahead, to the moment tomorrow morning when one of her three sons would hit shuffle on the family playlist, and for a moment, they would all lose track of where they were. But on July 3, that was all still to come.   Editor’s note: As a public service,   all our coronavirus coverage   is free.
By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy.

A Kenyan woman’s solar panel supports a community in lockdown

By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy.
This story was reported by the Thomson Reuters Foundation.Editor’s note: As a public service, the Monitor has removed the paywall   for all our coronavirus coverage. It’s free.

Wanja had hoped to be one of them. But the important thing is up-scaling these so that renewable energy generation can become cheaper in Africa,” said Mbeo Ogeya, one of the report’s authors.Accessibility is increasingStephen Nzioka, deputy director of renewable energy at Kenya’s Ministry of Energy and Petroleum, said the costs of solar energy are falling.A report published in June by the International Renewable Energy Agency noted that the cost of utility-scale PV solar power dropped by more than 80% between 2010 and last year.”We are encouraging renewable energy technologies and [their] dissemination, but also combining mini-grids with solar PV systems,” said Mr. Baz Ratner/Reuters

A patient reacts after being tested for the novel coronavirus in Machakos, Kenya, July 23, 2020. I do not know what I could be using to buy kerosene if I had not installed this solar unit.”
America has bungled the pandemic. Kenya region.One in 4 Kenyans – mostly in rural areas – do not have access to electricity. She applied for an electricity connection in 2016, but local officials said her application was turned down because she lived too far from the main road.Worried the kerosene lamps she used for lighting could cause a fire or the toxic fumes would harm her children’s health, she decided to put some of her savings into buying a solar system.Now she has power through the blackouts, she saves the dollar a week she used to spend on kerosene, and her children can study safely, she said.”Sometimes I would even take the tin lamp to use in the kitchen, leaving my children in darkness. July 24, 2020

By Kagondu Njagi
Reuters

Gakunga, Kenya
When Lucyline Wanja Silas installed a 12-volt solar power unit at her home to help her children study at night, little did she know it would become essential to her and her neighbors in Gakunga village, central Kenya, during the coronavirus pandemic.Ms. Solar panels could provide a solution. But now I do not have to because there is solar lighting in my kitchen,” Ms. I cannot afford to pay the daily fee. Those who do face high costs and frequent blackouts due to an unreliable supply.As cases of the novel coronavirus continue to climb in Kenya, the lack of reliable power can be a matter of life and death, said Ms. Wanja, a farm worker, said she had not made any money since the country’s lockdown started in March, but the solar photovoltaic (PV) unit she purchased in January means she no longer needs to buy kerosene for lamplight.And she can also help others in her area who are without electricity, either because of faults on power lines around the country due to heavy rains since March or because they could not pay their bills after losing their jobs during the pandemic.”My neighbors who are experiencing blackouts now come to me so that I can charge their phones for them for a fee,” she said, adding that they pay 20 to 50 Kenyan shillings ($0.19-0.46).”There is no money out there. Loading… Njeru, whose work involves taking patients with urgent health problems to and from hospital.”Without a power source, families facing an emergency are not able to keep their mobile phones charged to call us. Now what?With extreme weather and the economic impact of COVID-19 plunging many Kenyans into darkness, alternative energy sources are increasingly important – even for families connected to the grid, said Pamela Mukami Njeru, a community health volunteer in the central Mt. Nzioka, adding that the government had removed import duty on solar products.Harriet Lamb, CEO of British climate charity Ashden, has called for investors, governments, and philanthropic groups to create a $35-million fund to support community-based clean-energy businesses during the COVID-19 outbreak, as customers struggle to pay.”Off-grid solar offers a lifeline for around 470 million people, keeping lights on and equipment working in health facilities, small businesses, and households,” she said in a statement earlier this month.”But some clean energy businesses are vulnerable to collapse without support to see them through the pandemic.”Ms. A Kenyan woman’s solar panel supports a community in lockdown

Lucyline Wanja Silas saved up to buy a solar panel and now it is keeping her lights on and her neighbors’ phones charged during Kenyas blackouts and an economic slump. Wanja said the weekly payments she makes on her solar unit work out at 55 Kenyan shillings a day.Yet, while the government is now easing the coronavirus lockdown, she still has no work – so even that small but essential cost is proving too much.”Much of my income comes from doing menial jobs, but now there are none because of COVID-19. Wanja said.If more Kenyans switched to solar, the move could also help curb climate change, according to a 2018 report by Stockholm Environment Institute Africa researchers.Replacing smoky fuels such as kerosene, wood, and charcoal with solar energy could help reduce emissions in Kenya by 1.8 megatonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent by 2030, it said.In 2015, less than 1% of Kenya’s electricity came from solar – with most generated from fossil fuels, hydropower, and geothermal energy – but the country has the potential to push that up to more than 7% by 2030, the report added.The researchers linked the slow uptake of solar energy to high investment costs in recent years, noting that upfront costs involved in generating one kilowatt of energy from solar were more than three times as much as those for hydropower.”We have the solutions and we have the technologies. This is how having a solar unit which can supply power all day and night can save lives,” she told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.In early May, Kenya suffered a nationwide blackout that lasted about six hours, and the following month, more than 20 counties lost electricity for about 10 hours.Bernard Ngugi, managing director of the Kenya Power and Lighting Company, told reporters in June that the blackouts were the result of work being done by the company to replace damaged power lines or to upgrade the network to connect new customers.Slow path to solarMs. We need help,” she said. Falling solar prices mean more people can switch to clean energy. As the number of cases rises in Kenya, many rural Kenyans are unable to rely on usual sources of income to pay for electricity.
Get the Monitor Stories you care about delivered to your inbox.

With Siberia in flames, climate change hits home for Russia

Slivyak of Ecodefense says the reason for the Russian government’s reluctance to face and adapt to the realities of long-term climate change is that it would mean calling into question Russia’s basic economic strategy.“We have had the same strategy for the past 50 years, which is to ramp up extraction of fossil fuels, mostly for export,” he says. “Russian officials may be learning to talk the talk about climate change at international forums, but whenever issues of economic development come up, the chief goals are always more oil, gas, and coal. They are just not ready to accept that without radical adaptations, this is going to get worse, much worse.” Mr.
Get the Monitor Stories you care about delivered to your inbox.

Cities that have seldom seen summer temperatures above 70 degrees Fahrenheit have been sweltering under a hot season that began a month early.The ongoing forest fires are estimated to have so far released 56 million tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere – more than the annual emissions of some midsized European countries. That has caused at least one disastrous industrial accident, and threatens the integrity of the entire region’s infrastructure, including pipelines, roads, and housing.“What we are witnessing is not just a rate of warming over Siberia and the Arctic that’s two or three times the global average, but changes in atmospheric patterns,” says Valentina Khan of the Hydrometeorological Research Center of the Russian Federation. So they never invested in prevention. Two decades ago, we might have concentrated on reducing greenhouse gases. “In the long run, something has to be done about the emissions of greenhouse gases.”
America has bungled the pandemic. There is the likelihood in future of more extreme weather events, which will be greater in their frequency and duration.”“We have been warning about this”A team of international researchers has concluded that this year’s Siberian heat wave would have been virtually impossible without man-made climate change. Chebakova. And the toxic haze from the fires has reportedly settled over several towns, aggravating health conditions – and moods – for many inhabitants who are still under obligatory coronavirus lockdown.Meanwhile, high temperatures are accelerating the melting of Russia’s 17 million square miles of permafrost above the Arctic Circle. )

By Fred Weir
Special correspondent

This year has brought unprecedented forest fires to Siberia, devastating an area the size of the state of Washington in Russia’s vast Asian landmass. Russian Emergencies Ministry/Reuters

Russian officials, like these members of the Russian Emergencies Ministry in the Khanty-Mansiysk Autonomous Region, are working to contain the fires. But now we have a warming process that’s well underway, and it’s going to be with us for some time,” he says. Now what?“Unprecedented” phenomenaThe ongoing forest fires are estimated to have so far released 56 million tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere – more than the annual emissions of some midsized European countries. “Now it’s happening, and they are still in denial. And the toxic haze from the fires has reportedly settled over several towns, aggravating health conditions for many inhabitants.Meanwhile, high temperatures are accelerating the melting of Russia’s 17 million square miles of permafrost above the Arctic Circle. That’s why we can say that the human factor is the key problem here.” “There is the likelihood in future of more extreme weather events, which will be greater in their frequency and duration.”

Moscow
Siberia is burning.Russia’s enormous but sparsely populated Asian landmass is experiencing record-breaking temperatures, the fifth year in a row it has done so.But this year has brought unprecedented forest fires that have devastated a territory the size of the state of Washington, and blanketed vast areas with thick air pollution. With Siberia in flames, climate change hits home for Russia

Why We Wrote This

Siberia may be best known for being cold. That has caused at least one disastrous industrial accident, and threatens the integrity of the entire region’s infrastructure, including pipelines, roads, and housing. July 23, 2020

Two ways to read the story

Quick Read
Deep Read ( 5 Min. But the melting earth also threatens to disgorge huge amounts of greenhouse gases, such as methane, that have been locked in the ice throughout human history, threatening incalculable future consequences.The near-complete disappearance of sea ice off Russia’s northern coast this year has proved an economic boon, with shipping companies predicting that year-round navigation through the once icebound Northeast Passage might soon become possible. “For instance, we need proper management of forests, with better fire prevention and firefighting capacities, yet the numbers of people doing these things have been steadily reduced. Aside from the overt damage they are doing to the forests, they are also releasing long-frozen greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. For over a decade Russia has been preparing to exploit the vast trove of resources opening up as the Arctic ice pack recedes and has been steadily building infrastructure, including military bases, to promote that effort. But scientists and activists say the government needs to take more preventive action as well. But what about next year?”“A lack of official responsibility”The government’s lack of preparedness became clear at the end of May after melting permafrost caused fuel tanks to rupture at a power station belonging to the huge NorNickel mining and smelting company, near the city of Norilsk in Siberia’s far north. But scientists fret that the declining albedo, or reflectivity, of the vanishing ice sheets will only create a negative feedback loop that accelerates the melt-off in coming years.“These phenomena are unprecedented,” says Valentina Khan, deputy director of the Hydrometeorological Research Center of the Russian Federation, part of the national weather service. Then they tried to cover up the accident, and failed to act swiftly to contain the damage. And, they warn, it is a climate catastrophe that might be just beginning.“If these temperatures repeat themselves next year, the situation on the southern fringe of Siberian forests is going to become critical,” says Nadezhda Chebakova, a researcher at the   Sukachev Institute of Forest in Krasnoyarsk. Of course there is much more reliable information about global warming and the growing environmental catastrophe in the Russian media than there was 10 years ago, and scientists are talking about it more. The receding permafrost has exposed copious remains of long-extinct woolly mammoths, frozen for thousands of years beneath the tundra, sparking worries of a new “gold rush” to harvest the prehistoric beasts’ valuable ivory tusks. But this summer, large parts of it are in flames – a state of affairs that Russian scientists say is a byproduct of climate change, and is likely to end up accelerating the process. “It’s pretty clear that we are looking at a general warming trend, and 90% of Russian scientists believe it is caused by human activity.”Environmentalists are beside themselves with dread and frustration.“We have been warning about this for at least two decades, and successive Russian governments have failed to take heed,” says Vladimir Slivyak, co-chair of Ecodefense, one of Russia’s oldest – and perennially embattled – environmental organizations. But big business cares only about maintaining the status quo, exploiting nature in profitable ways. The main approach in play right now appears to be to wait for autumn, for the rains to come. It’s a view the Russian government has been slow to accept, but most Russian scientists now admit that it must be deemed a permanent factor.“What we’ve seen here in central Siberia is an absolutely abnormal April, with temperatures above 30 degrees Celsius [86 F], and in general temperatures about 2 degrees above the 100-year average,” says Dr. “The dangers of melting permafrost have been obvious for years. The spill released 20,000 tons of diesel fuel into the soil and nearby rivers, creating what local activists described as an “environmental catastrophe.” A few days later, President Vladimir Putin declared a state of emergency in Norilsk, but the damage to the delicate northern ecosystem seems set to persist for decades.“The main problem is a lack of official responsibility,” says Vassily Yablokov,   climate project manager at Greenpeace Russia. Loading… Julia Petrenko/Greenpeace/Reuters

Fires like this one, in the Krasnoyarsk region in the middle of Siberia July 17, 2020, are devastating Russia’s Asian landmass. Cities that have seldom seen summer temperatures above 70 degrees Fahrenheit have been sweltering under a hot season that began a month early this year, and has been consistently delivering daily temperatures several degrees above average.Scientists say Siberia is warming at twice the global average – leading to extreme weather events, severe environmental deterioration, and serious complications for human habitation. But we still don’t hear much from government officials.“What we need to see, urgently, is the creation of an adaptation plan. “What we are witnessing is not just a rate of warming over Siberia and the Arctic that’s two or three times the global average, but changes in atmospheric patterns.
By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy.

China pushes Huawei, Washington pulls another way

Get the Monitor Stories you care about delivered to your inbox.
It is not yet clear which way Europe’s largest economy will go: Chancellor Angela Merkel has seemed leery of having to choose sides as diplomatic and trade relations between the U.S. (Germany’s biggest trade partner) and China (its third biggest) have become more adversarial.But as Washington and Beijing battle for global technological leadership, neither of them may leave much room for other countries to steer a noncommittal course. The key voice is likely to be Germany’s.

Just last month, it surpassed South Korea’s Samsung to claim the No. And so it proved this past week, with the spotlight falling on China’s drive to displace the United States as world leader in technology and telecommunications, and on U.S. The Chinese telecom giant is leading Beijing’s challenge to U.S. But a number of Eastern European countries, and Italy, have signed on to Belt and Road investment plans and may well be reluctant to exclude Huawei. Two years ago, it leapfrogged Apple to become the world’s second-largest smartphone maker. retains a clear lead in technology and innovation. Dado Ruvic/Photo illustration/Reuters

At Washington’s request, the British government has banned 5G equipment made by Huawei. Canada has been holding off, apparently afraid that a negative decision could provoke Beijing into worsening the situation for two Canadians it has detained since Canada held a Huawei executive wanted by the U.S. allies have decided to ban or phase out Huawei equipment, Australia and Japan among them, but many other countries – especially in Asia, Africa, and Latin America – are buying from Huawei, not least because it is cheaper than the competition.Now all eyes are on Europe, where governments would prefer not to antagonize China but do not want to risk U.S. Though nominally a private company, Huawei has benefited from billions of dollars in state credits. July 23, 2020

Two ways to read the story

Quick Read
Deep Read ( 3 Min. )

By Ned Temko
Correspondent

When the British government decided last week to ban all equipment made by the Chinese firm Huawei from the United Kingdom’s 5G network, it did so in large part because Washington wanted it to.Huawei, the top telecom equipment-maker in the world, has become a poster child for China’s technological prowess, and for President Xi Jinping’s ambition to put China at the cutting edge of artificial intelligence, robots, and self-driving cars.The U.S. Britain just complied. And it is playing a starring role in President Xi Jinping’s explicit strategy to position China at the cutting edge of future technological applications – not just in telecommunications but in areas like artificial intelligence, electric and self-driving cars, robots, and space travel.In pressing Britain and other countries to exclude Huawei equipment from their 5G networks, Washington has raised genuine security concerns, warning that Chinese-built networks could hide “back doors” through which sensitive data could be passed on to Beijing. It was also a sign of why   this cold war, if it happens, will be different from the decadeslong rivalry with a decidedly more low-tech Soviet Union.China plays catch-upIn most fields, the U.S. These include states across Asia, the Arab world, Africa, and Latin America where China has won financial and political influence through its Belt and Road program of loans and investment in infrastructure projects.Yet most closely watched in the months ahead will be what happens in the EU, the world’s largest trading bloc, which has long had close ties with the U.S. Under Chinese law, Huawei must share information with the country’s security services if asked to do so.But with 21st-century economies so dependent on technology, it’s the potential geopolitical implications of Chinese advances that have been preoccupying Washington, especially since China already exerts enormous influence on international trade, investment, and development.Belt and Road relationshipsBritain has now joined a group of countries traditionally close to the U.S., including Australia, New Zealand, and Japan, that have decided to ban or phase out Huawei equipment. global technological dominance. China pushes Huawei, Washington pulls another way

Why We Wrote This

Today, technological primacy means geopolitical dominance. Will others follow? Washington is pressuring allies to ban Chinese 5G equipment. Loading… With its universities, research institutions, and technology incubators – as well as market-shaping companies, from Apple and Microsoft to Amazon and Tesla – this seems unlikely to change in the immediate future. But as Beijing and Washington battle for global technological leadership, neither of them is likely to leave much room for other countries to steer a noncommittal course. Several U.S. Other political and economic calculations were also in play, not least Britain’s need to forge a new international identity and role now that it has left the European Union.But what finally tipped the scales toward a tougher Huawei decision was pressure, private and public, from Washington. government is trying to stymie Huawei’s international spread as part of its broader campaign to constrain China: In today’s world, technological primacy means geopolitical dominance. By 2012, it had overtaken Sweden’s Ericsson as the top manufacturer of telecommunications equipment. And with its government patronage, it has also been able to undercut competitors on price.Huawei is one of dozens of increasingly successful Chinese technology companies. Now what?But Huawei, founded in the late 1980s, has become a leading world player. 1 spot. London
Sometimes a single decision by a single government can illuminate an important trend on the world stage. and China in what some pundits are calling the potential start of a new cold war. wrath either. will, or can, exert similar sway on other traditional allies as they make their Huawei decisions. Yet Britain’s Huawei decision was a dramatic reminder of the importance of the competition for technological primacy. In many countries, the decision is going in Huawei’s favor. authorities.What’s less clear, looking ahead, is whether the U.S. America has bungled the pandemic. There are multiple points of contention between the U.S. efforts to thwart Beijing’s ambition.That clash was not the only reason the British government decided to bar the giant Chinese company Huawei from its forthcoming 5G network – a major extension of its earlier, more limited move to restrict the company’s role. Its 5G kit is regarded as being at least as good as that made by Ericsson or other Western firms. but where China has been building an increasingly important network of economic ties in recent years.Washington will be hoping that, at the very least, EU countries strictly limit Huawei participation in 5G, especially since European firms like Ericsson and the Finnish company Nokia could provide alternative solutions.

By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy.

Meet the woman behind Israel’s ‘communities of kindness’

“At home and at school I always felt I needed to take the world on my shoulders.”   Ms. Altschuler says her drive to start movements began early.“I always felt the world was my responsibility,” she says.

By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy.

Get the Monitor Stories you care about delivered to your inbox.

Peer-led youth movements, where teenagers are given the responsibility of leading younger children, are a central part of Israeli culture. They were still close four years later when she took part in a leadership initiative for teenagers. Loading… Altschuler is still leading grand initiatives. “You don’t need special training to connect with another person and be nice.”   For Ms. “Inclu” is a network of the country’s first inclusive public schools, in which typical and special needs pupils with a range of physical or intellectual impairments study together.“For me the biggest mission is to create communities of kindness,” says Ms. Sender-Mulla, small groups gather to share memories of the Holocaust in the intimate settings of people’s homes.It started when Ms. If there was a recurring theme in her creations, it was this: They looked different from anything in the world around her.“I looked at things differently. “The idea is that everyone belongs.”

When Adi Altschuler was a girl of 12, she volunteered to work with an organization for disabled youth. She has two more grand initiatives to her credit. When really, she says, all people function with disabilities; it’s just that some are more visible than others. In Israel 76 chapters serve 7,000 youth. “The idea is that everyone belongs – I think this revolution of inclusion can really change people’s outlook.”Israel has been touted for innovation in high-tech, but it has also become a greenhouse for social startups. But they also need friends, a chance to connect with other youth,” she says. Meet the woman behind Israel’s ‘communities of kindness’

Why We Wrote This

How do you help people feel like they belong? Sender-Mulla. “I’m an expert at finding experts,” she says with a laugh.New approach on the HolocaustThe second social movement Ms. “When I grew up, I think the space for thinking of ideas only grew, and I would try to produce whatever that idea was. Altschuler. And participating in them is something of a rite of passage, but was previously unattainable for children with disabilities.Krembo is the first and only youth movement of its kind in the world. They became friends and eventually collaborators.“I think Adi has a great way of pitching amazing ideas and being able to harness people’s attention and their desire to move things forward,” says Ms. Heidi Levine/Special to The Christian Science Monitor

Adi Altschuler poses at Tel Aviv’s Bikurim school, an inclusive school where typical and disabled children study together, July 13, 2020. In 2018 the United Nations recognized it for its leadership in inclusion and designated it as a “special adviser” for other countries looking to integrate special-needs youth into the broader social fold. The school is part of a network inspired by her Krembo Wings youth movement. Courtesy of Krembo Wings

Youth goof around at a meeting of the Krembo Wings youth movement, which brings together special needs and more typically developing children in Israel. are so often dealing with doctors and therapists.   “For the past several years the youth who are involved have been leading a quiet social revolution to make a better, more open and more accepting society – one that says, ‘There is a place for everyone,’” says Sigal Dekel, the movement’s communication manager. Altschuler initiated, Zikaron B’Salon, or Memories in the Living Room, is revolutionizing how Israelis memorialize the Holocaust. Altschuler.She says she’s not a good manager but does excel at finding people to collaborate with who can help push through a vision. America has bungled the pandemic. Those friends told others, and suddenly there were 40 people in the living room – most of them strangers.The program has grown. Altschuler says she is driven less by a passion for a certain group or subject, than by a need to, as she puts it, “fix things.”“Everyone has their gift, and that’s something I’m good at – starting things. Today her organization, Krembo Wings, matches typically developing children with children with disabilities.Peer-led youth movements, where teenagers are given the responsibility of leading younger children, are a central part of Israeli culture. Altschuler has tapped into something in Israel’s younger generation.“We don’t want to passively accept things as they are, but engage and create,” she says. “These kids … Participants were asked to think of something that bothered them about society that they thought needed to be fixed.Thinking of Kfir and his social isolation, unable to just walk out the door to see friends, she decided to scale the kind of relationship they had by forming a local group bringing children with disabilities together with more typically developing children and teenagers.“Children with disabilities” is a phrase Ms. This year, some 2 million people participated via Zoom in Israel and abroad.Her third and current undertaking expands on the formative experience of creating Krembo Wings.“Inclu” is a network of the country’s first inclusive public schools, in which typical and special-needs pupils with a range of physical or intellectual impairments study together.“I always thought: What would Krembo Wings look like in a school– a school infused with its values?” she says.“For me the biggest mission is to create communities of kindness – where people understand that diversity is a blessing and it’s an opportunity to see a range of human experiences out there,” says Ms. Her Memories in the Living Room project is revolutionizing how Israelis memorialize the Holocaust. Altschuler, Krembo was just her first foray into social entrepreneurship. Now what?The local group she formed soon grew into a youth movement across Israel with the help of Kfir’s mother, Claudia Kobi. And participating in them is something of a rite of passage, but was previously unattainable for kids with disabilities.Today, two decades later, Krembo boasts 76 chapters in Israel that serve 7,000 children and youth, and Ms. What started as an informal gathering with friends to hear one survivor’s story has evolved into a program spread across 55 different countries.Her most recent undertaking expands on the formative experience of creating Krembo Wings. It was named Krembo Wings, after a marshmallow-and-chocolate cookie popular with Israeli children. She describes their introduction as “love at first sight.”Their meetings went from once weekly to several times a week. Altschuler, disappointed by the formulaic nature of Israeli ceremonies on Holocaust Remembrance Day, with what to her felt like a rote collection of songs, poems, and dry speeches, decided in 2010 to try something more personal.She invited a survivor to her parents’ home and emailed friends to come hear the survivor’s story. Altschuler 11 years ago through a gathering at the World Economic Forum for leaders under 30. Sender-Mulla says Ms. Her long list of awards and recognitions, in Israel and abroad, includes being named in 2016 by Time magazine as one of six leaders of the future.Danna Sender-Mulla met Ms. I am not capable of closing my eyes when I see something that needs addressing,” she says.She also insists that all of her endeavors are based on teamwork.“I always meet people along the way that inspire me; these are not just my creations, but ultimately, the product of many people,” says Ms. In 2019, 1.5 million people attended events across 55 countries. Sometimes it’s as simple as creating opportunities to bring them together. Adi Altschuler has been doing just that since she was a teen. I could not let things remain at the idea stage,” she says. )

By Dina Kraft
Correspondent

Adi Altschuler was just 16 years old when she first dabbled in social entrepreneurship. Altschuler says she remembers herself always creating – drawing, writing, making things. Altschuler prefers today not to use, because, she says, it connotes that they have disabilities while “typical children” do not. “Adi has the ability to get anyone excited about what she is excited about.”A need to fix thingsRecalling her childhood outside Tel Aviv, Ms. Altschuler. Ms. “I could not rest till they were done.”Ms. In the project she has worked on with Ms. “It’s the most respectful place I’ve ever been,” says Tamar Sommer, 15, who says she is looking forward to becoming a counselor in the fall. July 23, 2020

Two ways to read the story

Quick Read
Deep Read ( 5 Min. She was assigned to work with a 3-year-old with a bright smile and face sprinkled with freckles.Kfir Kobi could neither walk nor speak, she says, but he understood everything going on around him. And then I tried to reduce the gap between what I saw and what I imagined,” she says.

They’ve faced brutal cops abroad. Now they’re advising US protesters.

Nazzal also felt a powerful sense of urgency. – along with police action to halt them – the movement came with them.“Life-changing” informationLaw enforcement around the world is increasingly responding to popular protests with crowd-control weapons (CCWs), according to the U.S. Now what?It is a sort of switch for the U.S., which is usually in the position of observer – and sometimes supplier – of violent police action globally. Protesters in the   U.S. Ms. were able to look at the weapons being fired at them and using Ms. “In Palestine, we usually keep [protester identities and knowledge of weaponry] under wraps,” she says. “The proliferation of CCWs without adequate regulation, training, monitoring and/or accountability, has led to the widespread and routine use or misuse of these weapons, resulting in injury, disability, and death,” PHR noted in a 2016 report. … Why We Wrote This

The violent tactics used by U.S. “Right now we’re systematically documenting specific cases of injuries but certainly in terms of projectile injuries, we’ve already documented about a hundred or more quite serious cases. “In terms of projectile injuries, we’ve already documented about a hundred or more quite serious cases.”

Brighton, England
As cities across the United States erupted with protesters demonstrating against the killings of Breonna Taylor and George Floyd and demanding an end to police brutality, on the internet, Twitter was erupting, too: with advice.“Tips, if not wearing a gas mask … rubbing a pinch of salt around eyes, helps combat the impact of the smoke. Take care, stay safe & keep reporting. But now I can identify by looking or hearing the sound. were always criticized, but domestic problems never found a way into the mainstream media outside the country,” he says. – along with police action to halt them – a transnational movement of information sharing came with them.This information sharing was both needed and necessary for people on the ground, given the extent of injuries in the U.S., says Dr. The civilian movements in the   U.S. in their full tactical gear using crowd-control measures the way he saw during protests in Kashmir.“Foreign policies of the U.S. Nazzal was able to identify this weaponry used against   U.S. Loading… And when those protests came to the U.S. Now they’re advising US protesters. In 2019, analysts at Allied Market Research found that the world’s nonlethal weapons market – that is, weapons frequently used in law enforcement – could be worth more than $9.6 billion by 2022.For Rana Nazzal, whose Twitter thread on identifying police weapons went viral, it started with a phone call from a friend in New York who was being fired at with tear gas and had no time to research what to do. Nazzal. was comparable to other demonstrations around the world, according to Dr. But when human rights protests came to the U.S. The scale and the severity is comparable.”Some of the cases PHR has documented include a reporter in Louisville, Kentucky, who was hit by a pepper ball while on live television, delivered by an officer who appeared to be aiming directly at her, and a police officer in New York City who pulled down the face mask of a protester who already had his hands up, and shot pepper spray directly into his face.A new view of the U.S.Sagar Kaul, co-founder of fact-checking platform Metafact and an expert in tracking misinformation online, was born in the Kashmir Valley and is married to a U.S. It was one of the things that took me the longest to learn and when I did, it was life-changing.”Ms. seem to be evolving rapidly, and incorporating strategies from resistance movements elsewhere, such as in Hong Kong, where protesters wore generic black clothing to conceal their identities. Nazzal, who spent many years participating in weekly direct action and joining organized protests in the Palestinian territories and is currently doing her master’s in Toronto, gave him quick tips on keeping safe, but then decided to take it one step further. Nazzal’s posts, among others, recognize them and make educated guesses about next steps during the demonstrations.This information sharing was needed for people on the ground, given that the extent of injuries in the U.S. But as the number of protests around the world have risen in recent years, as people have taken to the streets to demand rights and freedoms, so too has a transnational movement of information sharing, largely on Twitter and focused on safety. Love from Kashmir.”“In Palestine, first thing we do under fire is identify the type of weapons israeli cops/soldiers are holding. They know that people with experience won’t run from stun grenades. Keep that in mind because israel trains US police & they may be using same strategies.”From the identification of weapons to protecting one’s self when shot at, users from the Palestinian territories, Kashmir, Chile, and Hong Kong, gave advice on each and every aspect of demonstrating against brutal police states and keeping safe when in the midst of chaos. This defines your strategy for resisting + trying to be safe.”“israeli soldiers sometimes use stun grenades to thin out a crowd & then go in & arrest people. They’ve faced brutal cops abroad. citizen. “It’s only now that we know how badly racism and inequality has affected a large population of the country.”For protesters and the people who have been advising them, there has been a marked shift not just in the way the protests are seen around the world, but the boldness of the protesters themselves.“We’re seeing a lot more civil unrest that’s going beyond what you’d usually see at a protest, especially a big one,” says Ms. Nazzal, who spent many years joining organized protests in the Palestinian territories, gave him quick tips on keeping safe, but then decided to make it public.It is a sort of switch for the U.S., which is usually in the position of observer of violent police action globally. Ms. America has bungled the pandemic. And that familiarity is turning global resisters of police brutality into online advisers of American protesters who are now in harm’s way. Dar Yasin/AP

Clashes between Indian police and Kashmiri protesters, like these here during a protest in outskirts of Srinagar on June 22, 2018, are the sorts of conflicts that created the knowledge base now being offered to U.S. protesters because many of the weapons, especially the tear gas, bought by Israel and seen in protests in the Palestinian territories, are U.S.-made. He was 11 years old when the insurgency started in India-controlled Kashmir, and he says he never thought he would ever witness police agencies   in the U.S. )

By Natasha Khullar Relph
Correspondent

As cities across the United States erupted with protesters demonstrating against the killings of Breonna Taylor and George Floyd and demanding an end to police brutality, the internet was erupting, too: with advice.For Rana Nazzal, whose Twitter thread on identifying police weapons went viral, it started with a phone call from a friend in New York who was being fired at with tear gas and had no time to research what to do. law enforcement in recent weeks are familiar abroad. Michele Heisler, PHR medical director and University of Michigan professor of internal medicine and public health. nongovernmental organization Physicians for Human Rights (PHR). Michele Heisler of Physicians for Human Rights. Caitlin Ochs/Reuters

Protesters in the United States, like this one who has milk poured on his eyes after being tear gassed during a protest in Portland, Oregon, July 19, 2020, are being offered tactical advice online by activists who have had similar clashes with brutal law enforcement in their countries. July 22, 2020

Two ways to read the story

Quick Read
Deep Read ( 4 Min. protesters today. While worried for her safety in sharing all that she knew, Ms. “I’ve still never touched a weapon; I don’t know that much about them.
as a superpower has definitely changed over the years.” is a developed country, the rights of its citizens to protest wouldn’t be dealt with by bringing in national guards firing tear gas and rubber bullets, and injuring a large number of protesters,” Mr. Kaul says. “The perception of the U.S. soil by their own police.“I think we assume that since the U.S. It has been surprising, for many from Kashmir to Brazil, to see such violence being committed against American citizens on   U.S.

Get the Monitor Stories you care about delivered to your inbox.
By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy.

For young Afghan women, jujitsu is more than just a sport

Esazada said she wants to show a more positive side of Afghanistan – and “become famous and win the world jujitsu championship medal.”
America has bungled the pandemic. Between head-holds and high-kicks, the women are finding empowerment in the martial art as they face the country’s shifting political winds. Rasuli said she is happiest when she can come out of her home and exercise with the other young women at the club. Tamana Sarwary/AP

Members of a female jujitsu club in Kabul, Afghanistan practice jumps on a snowy hilltop on Jan. She is now one of two dozen Afghan women who find inspiration and empowerment in Japanese jujitsu, a martial arts form that dates back centuries.They love the sport and dare to dream big, hoping someday to compete on the international level.In war-torn Afghanistan, where gender discrimination has deep cultural and historical roots and where many women suffer from domestic violence, jujitsu seems an ideal sport for women. In winter, they practice their wrestle holds on snow-covered hilltops above Kabul.Today, about two-thirds of Afghanistan’s population is 25 or younger and Ms. and the Taliban earlier this year signed a deal on ending America’s longest war – an accord that also envisages peace talks between the Taliban and the Kabul government – women in Afghanistan have become increasingly worried about losing some of the rights and freedoms they have gained over the past two decades.Under the Taliban, women were not allowed to go to school, work outside the home, or leave their house without a male escort. They braid each other’s hair before training sessions, spar against one another, take turns on the even bars. In 2010, the Afghan female soccer team defeated Pakistan 4-0 at the South Asian Football Championship. Hussiani’s group find strength in their team spirit. Now what?Sayed Jawad Hussiani, a jujitsu instructor at the Nero club where Ms. Women faced especially strict restrictions under the Taliban, but these young women don’t remember the regime, which ruled before the 2001 U.S. Esazada trains, said this martial arts form with roots in feudal Japan was first brought to Afghanistan in 2005 but has since become popular among boys and girls alike.The women in Mr. Esazada said she is not afraid of the Taliban, and if they come back, she would simply “continue my training to reach my dreams.”She looks to Afghan women athletes who have made their mark on the world stage. 27, 2020. And though they still face many challenges, Afghan women are increasingly stepping into their own power in this male-dominated society, finding a voice even in sports.Ms. July 22, 2020

By Tamana Sarwary
Associated Press

Kabul, Afghanistan
A year and a half ago, Liqa Esazada for the first time stepped into a martial arts club for women in Kabul, something of a rarity in this still deeply conservative Muslim society.At the time, she had just accompanied her older sister but was immediately intrigued. Esazada’s fellow jujitsu student at the Nero club, Rana Rasuli, said she worries about her future if the Taliban manage to retake all of Afghanistan.For now, Ms. It teaches self-defense against a stronger and heavier opponent by using certain holds and principles of leverage.Ms. Loading… Female athletes from Afghanistan have won more than 100 medals at regional and international tournaments.Tahmina Kohistani, Afghanistan’s first female Olympic athlete, competed in the 100-meter run at the 2012 London Olympics. invasion. In 2011, Afghan female power lifters won three gold and two bronze medals at pan-Asian games held in Kazakhstan.Ms. For young Afghan women, jujitsu is more than just a sport

Young women in Afghanistan are learning jujitsu, inspired by female Afghan Olympic athletes. Esazada said she has no memory of the Taliban regime, which hosted Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden and ruled Afghanistan before the 2001 United States invasion.But since the U.S.

By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy.
It’s free. This story was reported by The Associated Press.Editor’s note: As a public service, the Monitor has removed the paywall   for all our coronavirus coverage.

Get the Monitor Stories you care about delivered to your inbox.

With Little Free Pantries, neighbors feed neighbors in need

I need them. She is in the process of launching an online marketplace that she expects to be live later this summer,   www.pantrygift.org, that supports the mini-pantry movement by allowing people to make tax-deductible donations to individual pantries or pantry networks, or to create fundraising campaigns.“If it were just me, that box out there would be nothing more than a kind gesture to somebody,” she says. Ms. We all need each other.”   McClard maintains a website that offers guidance on topics like building and locating a mini pantry, as well as a map showing the location of many of the pantries. “It takes all of us to make this work. It’s only together that we do it.

“Circumstances are different for everyone and they are a nonjudgmental way to get food,” Ms. “They’re open 24/7. She became fascinated with them, and wanted to translate her interest in food insecurity into a similar project. Thus the idea for the Little Free Pantry was born, a free-standing cabinet with shelves and a door, mounted on a post. McClard’s pantry is entirely open source. McClard has a long-standing interest in poverty justice and a keen awareness of the prevalence of food insecurity in Northwest Arkansas. as well as in countries such as Canada, Australia, the Netherlands, and Thailand. Last year, the food bank served more than 200,000 people and distributed over 32 million pounds of food. Brenda Shaw is the chief development officer of the Lowcountry Food Bank in Charleston, South Carolina, which services 300 partner agencies in a 9,000 square mile territory. McClard says, adding that many food pantries require recipients to go through means testing, to determine if they are needy enough to receive benefits. “COVID has people looking to do something and this is something that people can do,” she says. With a microloan of $250, Ms. While her pantry has always been active, she has seen a spike over the past few months, both in how often it is emptied and in the number of new pantries opening up worldwide. The homemade book exchange boxes had been proliferating all over the country. In 2 1/2 years, the Columbus Blessing Boxes Project has expanded to 60 mini pantries covering much of central Ohio. “Minis are a gap-filler,” Ms. Ms.   “I think [mini pantries] certainly address a need, especially for emergency food assistance,” Ms. )

By David Conrads
Correspondent

It was during one of her regular runs that Jessica McClard noticed the first Little Free Library in her hometown of Fayetteville, Arkansas. Harmon says. The homemade book exchange boxes had been proliferating all over the country. And it’s an anonymous access point, so anyone can come and get food.”   The mini-pantry movement has earned the respect of much larger hunger relief organizations. Shaw says. “I hoped that people would take the concept and run with it, and that’s exactly what happened.”A way to give back   Today there are hundreds of pantries in the U.S. … McClard says. as well as an estimated 3,000 pantries worldwide in countries like Canada, Australia, the Netherlands, and Thailand. “It takes all of us to make this work,” she says. Anyone can put up a pantry, anyone can take from the pantry, and anyone can donate to the pantry. Other pantries and networks of pantries are more organized. That project has since ballooned to 74 pantries located within a 30 miles radius of the city. “I knew what I was going to do.”  
America has bungled the pandemic. There’s no ID required. Loading… Mini pantries are not intended to take the place of food banks, which are far larger and have the capacity to serve much greater numbers of people. “There are a lot of people experiencing food insecurity who do not pass a means test,” Ms. “It’s only together that we do it. “Jessica’s idea to put out a food pantry to help those in need –   no questions asked, no signing up, a place anyone can go whenever it’s convenient –   was a fantastic idea,” Ms. Inspired by Little Free Libraries, an Arkansas woman leveraged that same community-led, grassroots spirit to address food insecurity. The Little Free Libraries, which started in 2009, primed many people to the concept of a public space where neighbors connect with neighbors, anonymously and with little organization. She became fascinated with the Little Free Libraries and thought a lot about why she was drawn to them.“These little free spaces create a place to be neighborly again,” she says. It’s filled with nonperishable food and personal hygiene products. Anyone can put up a pantry, take from the pantry, and donate to the pantry. With a microloan of $250, Ms. It’s filled with nonperishable food and personal hygiene products. “I really had no idea how fast it would happen,” Ms. “People are sometimes reluctant to ask for help,” she adds, noting that the mini pantries break the traditional provider-client relationship model. McClard installed the first Little Free Pantry on the grounds of her church in May 2016. I feel like it’s the mini-pantry moment.”   “We all need each other”   Gretchen Davis started a mini pantry in Columbus, Ohio, in 2018, impelled by a desire to create a volunteer opportunity for her four children. “Social distance is built in, so you really don’t need to be close to someone to help through these spaces. Within months, more than 100 pantries had sprung up across the country and the concept had gone international, with a Little Free Pantry reported in New Zealand. “If someone can’t get to a   larger pantry or to the food bank itself, mini pantries provide our neighbors in need with food immediately, which is a very good and honorable thing to do.”   July 21, 2020

Two ways to read the story

Quick Read
Deep Read ( 5 Min. Today, thousands of Little Free Pantries help feed those in need. 

Adria Pettigrew/Courtesy of Jessica McClard

Jessica McClard tends to the first Little Free Pantry, which is on the grounds of the Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, in Fayetteville, Arkansas, in November 2019. It’s an easy way for a lot of people to give back to their communities. McClard installed the first Little Free Pantry on the grounds of her church in Fayetteville in May 2016. With Little Free Pantries, neighbors feed neighbors in need

Why We Wrote This

Sometimes, charitable acts are contagious. If that’s the case, and it’s as much about the space as the books, then anything might go inside it.”   It didn’t take her long to figure out exactly what she wanted to put inside such a space. She was part of a giving circle at the elementary school her two daughters attended, helping provide food to students in need. Now what?Thus the idea for the Little Free Pantry was born. “All of those things clicked,” she says. Jessica McClard is an avid runner and reader.It was during her runs that she noticed the first Little Free Library in her hometown of Fayetteville, Arkansas. She created a Facebook page for the project and within a few days her story was picked up by the local media. “Minis are a place people can go when they can’t go somewhere else.”   “I see Little Free Pantries sitting alongside traditional sources of food,” says Molly Harmon, a chef in Seattle who used a microgrant to build and install six mini pantries last March. Soon there were four such libraries within walking distance of her home, situated in her middle-class neighborhood in a college town. She attributes the popularity and rapid expansion of the mini pantries to a number of factors. “It’s not a difficult project to execute,” she says, “but it also invites participation without having to execute. “And that is something that some of us really, really want. McClard says. Since mini pantries are small, they cannot stock the quantity and variety of foods that would be available at a food bank, nor are the contents of a mini pantry predictable. For a lot of people, it’s difficult to write a $25 check, but when they get paid, they might pick up an extra can of green beans and put it in the mini pantry. Friends and community members stock the pantry when they are moved to do so. Ms. Soon a third pantry popped up 300 miles away in Ardmore, Oklahoma. There are no schedules or sign-up sheets. Two weeks later, someone unknown to Ms. Things moved quickly from there. It’s food by neighbors for neighbors, so the likelihood of finding culturally relevant foods is higher. A Little Free Pantry can take many forms, but typically it’s a free-standing cabinet with shelves and a door, mounted on a post. Within months, more than 100 pantries had sprung up across the country. Today there are hundreds in the U.S. That happens all the time.”Ms. Davis says. The concept couldn’t be simpler. McClard put up a second pantry in another part of town. Today there are thousands of such pantries across the world. McClard estimates there are more than 3,000 pantries worldwide, though the exact number is impossible to know. We all need each other.” 

Fayetteville, Ark.

Get the Monitor Stories you care about delivered to your inbox.
By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy.

Europe’s tourism test: How do you bring in tourists and not an outbreak, too?

By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy.

Get the Monitor Stories you care about delivered to your inbox.

“Everyone is pinning their hopes on a return to a normality (of sorts) in 2021. “Everyone is pinning their hopes on a return to a normality (of sorts) in 2021. Front desk staff wear a face shield to welcome guests; waiters and cleaners sport masks and gloves. Coll Suárez. Coll Suárez’s cafe-bar in this tourist town has been nearly full since reopening July 13. Mr. “If people do not stop having this fear, whatever we do they will not travel.”

Karen Norris/Staff
“Salvage operation”Ultimately, 2020 will be at best a “salvage operation,” argues Tom Jenkins, CEO of the European Tourism Association. Many grocery stores take temperature readings at the door. “The bad thing is that people who are traveling right now are not afraid of COVID,” says Mr. Masks remain mandatory in all indoor spaces. Mr. July 21, 2020

Two ways to read the story

Quick Read
Deep Read ( 6 Min. While she is excited to be back at work, the pace of business has been disappointing.“It’s been hard,” says Ms. 
 “The setup of the hotel was in a magical way like a COVID-19 proof design,” says Mr. He was expecting 2020 to be an “extremely good year” with a projected net profit of €1.2 million ($1.37 million). Many in Puerto de la Cruz, on the isle of Tenerife, choose to wear them at all times, including outdoors, like here on San Telmo beach. One couple from Madrid finds it to be safer in Tenerife – where there are very few COVID-19 cases – than back home. “Everybody needed to let off steam, relax, … and eat well.”Dimitris Mamadas has two hotels open year-round in mainland Greece. While the hotel restaurant is open, clients are not allowed to touch anything and table service has replaced the traditional buffet dining.Guests say these protocols make them feel safe. “I could potentially be contagious to my loved ones. “Afterwards, it was a lesson in life, so that we appreciate what we have.”“We see a good vibe from our guests, that [is] the most rewarding part of this season,” he adds. Since reopening post-lockdown, business has been better than expected. The Mediterranean nation boasts one key advantage: It defied expectations in its pandemic response. Northern European beach destinations that can be reached overland will fare better, he says, while Mediterranean beach resorts, especially those dependent on airlines for access, will struggle.“As this business in 2020 is highly last minute, it is difficult to make a prediction, but it is highly unlikely that they will have more than 50% of their normal volume,” he says. Eugenia Petrova, a German tourist who was among the first tourists to arrive in town July 1, finds restrictions here similar to those in Berlin.“We were not so sure what to expect,” says Ms. There were no people around, and not many hotel services. Now what?“I love being around people and I want to work but it’s dangerous for me, my son, friends and family,” says Mr. Masks are required to enter, jewelry is disinfected and put on a tray for clients to try on, and the shop is constantly ventilated. Now it’s starting to become more normal.”Further south, Adeje boasts the highest concentration of five-star hotels in Europe. Europe’s tourism test: How do you bring in tourists and not an outbreak, too? Mamadas. Northern European beach destinations that can be reached overland will fare better, he says, while Mediterranean beach resorts, especially those dependent on airlines for access, will struggle.“As this business in 2020 is highly last minute, it is difficult to make a prediction, but it is highly unlikely that they will have more than 50% of their normal volume,” he says. “The movement of so many people means we don’t know what will happen.”With much of Europe tentatively returning to a semblance of normal life after several months of pandemic-induced lockdown, the opportunity for travel during the summer season has returned. The coronavirus crisis means he is facing losses to the tune of €500 million instead.The Aegli hotel in the port town of Volos is faring best, with a 55% occupancy rate, thanks to Balkan tourists who are coming overland. The reception, bar, and restaurant are all open plan. Except for help on Sundays, he works up to 14 hours, six days a week solo.Most of the clients at Meraki have crossed the street from the Hotel Turquesa Playa, one of the most successful hotels in Puerto de la Cruz, a town in the north of the island.The doorman here takes the temperature of everyone who enters; a mask is required in the common areas, and bottles of hand sanitizer sit just beyond the door. Maria Acevedo opened her artisanal jewelry shop Tuqueque in 2018. No paywall.Though a vital source of livelihood for Puerto de la Cruz and its kind, tourists also are a potential conduit for a COVID-19 outbreak to be introduced into the community. With most of his money tied up in the bank loans that helped launch the cafe, he desperately needs the business to succeed. “When we arrived, there were only three or four families in the hotel. The shops were closed. America has bungled the pandemic. Or reintroduced in the case of the island of Tenerife, where Puerto de la Cruz lies, as the nearby town of Adeje was the site of one of the earliest major outbreaks in Europe. Why We Wrote This

For Europe’s resort towns, getting back to business requires a careful balance: embracing tourists enough to make a living, but keeping them at enough of a distance to prevent a new outbreak of COVID-19. Colette Davidson

Masks are required in Spain’s Canary Islands in all indoor spaces as well as outdoors when social distancing can’t be respected. They cater to a mix of tourists and business travelers. Visitors are gifted complementary masks. Colette Davidson

Alberto Coll Suárez had just opened his cafe-bar, Meraki, in Puerto la Cruz six months before the coronavirus pandemic hit. And each room is assigned a specific sun lounger and umbrella.Guests who cancel – and there have been many – are offered vouchers for 2021.“It was a great shock in the beginning,” he says, looking back to February and March. “People are scared [to travel] and I’m a little scared too because I don’t know which way things are going to go.”Tenerife is taking no chances. And locals are increasingly wearing their masks to navigate the increasingly crowded town center. Business is better than expected, but concerns about the coronavirus linger on.“I’m anxious,” he says. Though a vital source of livelihood for travel destinations, tourists also are a potential conduit for a COVID-19 outbreak to be introduced into the community.Ultimately, 2020 will be at best a “salvage operation,” argues Tom Jenkins, CEO of the European Tourism Association. … I need to open my business but the fear is always there.”Caution in the Canary IslandsSpain’s Canary Islands region   depends on airlines to bring tourists. Coll Suárez had little time to prepare financially, but got by thanks to some savings and government aid. Many of the bookings for 2020 have been moved into that year.”

Puerto de la Cruz, Spain
Alberto Coll Suárez races around the patio of Meraki, a disposable face mask hanging precariously in the balance as he clears coffee cups and saucers from a handful of tables. The virus claimed fewer than 200 lives in Greece compared to nearly 35,000 in Italy.When Nikos Karaflos converted a disused wine factory and launched the beachfront   Dexamenes Seaside Hotel in 2019, near the town of Amaliada and the Olympia archaeological site, he was proud of its look. To that end, the H10 Costa Adeje Palace hosted the head of the World Tourism Organization and dozens of travel journalists to showcase the health protocols adopted across the archipelago.Frustrations in GreeceGreece is another destination trying to reassure tourists. He is grateful to be open even if finances are tough. However, a spike in COVID-19 cases associated with these travelers has led Greece to tighten restrictions – barring Serbians and requiring new arrivals from Bulgaria to present a negative COVID-19 test issued in the last 72 hours.At the Porto Palace in Thessaloniki, experiences with guests have been frustrating, as some expect normal services and are disappointed to learn saunas, hot tubs, and indoor pools are off-limits. “They think that everything has passed but it is not the case.”Giorgos Mylonadis, who runs studio apartments in the Greek island of Chios, is following government health protocols while waiting for ferry activity to resume with Turkey so longtime customers can visit before winter. Courtesy of the Dexamenes Hotel

The Dexamenes Seaside Hotel in Amaliada, Greece, which opened last year, turned out to be designed in a way that is particularly friendly to COVID-19 regulations. Among those erring on the side of caution is Naomi Benavides. Many of the bookings for 2020 have been moved into that year.”Back in Tenerife, the reopening of the European borders has sparked conflicting feelings among locals. But while resort towns like Puerto de la Cruz, reliant on tourism, are keen to try to make ends meet by courting travelers who dare hop on a plane, they must balance that against the serious public health concerns that remain.Editor’s note: As a public service,   all our coronavirus coverage   is free. Loading… )

By Colette Davidson
Correspondent

Dominique Soguel
Special correspondent

With much of Europe tentatively returning to a semblance of normal life after several months of pandemic-induced lockdown, the opportunity for travel during the summer season has returned.But while resort towns like Spain’s Puerto de la Cruz, reliant on tourism, are keen to try to make ends meet by courting travelers who dare hop on a plane, they must balance that against the serious public health concerns that remain. Tables are spaced out beyond the recommended distance. With one of the shop doors leading directly into the Hotel Turquesa Playa, she relies almost entirely on tourism to make ends meet.Since reopening at the end of June, she keeps a strict health protocol. The tourism sector is expected to operate at 30% of capacity compared to last summer, when the loss of 28,000 lives due to COVID-19 had yet to cast a shadow across Spain. Acevedo, who scraped by on government aid during the lockdown period. “People are afraid to travel,” he worries. Meraki had only been open for six months when the lockdown started on March 14. Petrova, who traveled with her husband and two children and whose need for a vacation proved greater than coronavirus fears. The tourism season officially opened on June 15 and international flights began reaching regional airports July 1. It is fighting hard to restore its image after making headlines in February when the H10 Costa Adeje Palace   had to confine over 1,000 people to their rooms after an Italian doctor and his wife tested positive for the virus.“We are working to show this summer that Adeje and the Canary Islands are a safe destination,” says Adolfo Alonso Ferrera, the Adeje councillor for tourism and sport. Only 341 routes are planned for the month of July, as opposed to the 770 before the pandemic. Karaflos. Guest suites are located in concrete former wine tanks – so no corridors, no elevators.

“There are so many people everywhere and you just don’t know where they’ve come from or if they’ve brought the virus with them.”Editor’s note: As a public service,   all our coronavirus coverage   is free. No paywall. “My friends were teasing me, like why are you wearing the mask outside now? But I started to get nervous,” says the Puerto de la Cruz native.

EU leaders prove ‘progress’ possible, set $2.1 trillion budget

Mike Corder in The Hague, Netherlands; Colleen Barry in Soave, Italy; and Pablo Gorondi in Budapest, Hungary, contributed.Editor’s note: As a public service, the Monitor has removed the paywall   for all our coronavirus coverage. This story was reported by The Associated Press. It’s free.
By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy.

Get the Monitor Stories you care about delivered to your inbox.

That is in addition to the agreement on the seven-year, 1 trillion-euro EU budget that leaders had been haggling over for months even before the pandemic. Merkel, Mr. the rule of law criticize us, the freedom fighters that did a lot against the communist regime in favor of rule of law,” he said. Macron said.Still, considering every EU leader had the right of veto on the whole package, the joint commitment to invest and spend such funds was hailed as a success.Adriaan Schout, an EU expert and Senior Research Fellow at the Clingendael think tank in the Netherlands, said that the unusually acrimonious and drawn-out talks ultimately produced a typical Brussels deal.“The EU hasn’t changed. There are checks and balances in it. Macron, and his Italian counterpart, Giuseppe Conte, Mr. Conte also didn’t have time to dwell on grudges. “We have created a possibility of taking up loans together, of setting up a recovery fund in the spirit of solidarity,” a sense of sharing debt that would have been unthinkable not so long ago.Ms. Rutte and others also wanted a link to be made between the handout of EU funds and the rule of law – a connection aimed at Poland and Hungary, countries with right-wing populist governments that many in the EU think are sliding away from democratic rule.In its conclusion, the European Council underlined the “importance of the respect of the rule of law” and said it will create a system of conditionality aimed at preventing member states from getting subsidies from the budget and recovery fund if they don’t abide by its principles.But Tuesday was a moment to revel in the achievement itself. We don’t know how they will work.”The days and nights of brutal summiteering will surely have left many wounds between member states, but as history has proven, the EU has an uncanny gift to quickly produce scar tissue and move on.“We all can take a hit,” said Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte. “And the compromise has been hard fought. Conte said.Even if Tuesday’s agreement was a giant leap forward, the European Parliament, which has called the moves of the member states too timid considering the challenge, still has to approve the deal.Mr. EU leaders agreed to an aid package for those hit by the virus which has killed 135,000 in the bloc. But if they don’t stand together, nothing is possible,” said Mr. With 35,000 Italians dead from COVID-19 and facing EU estimates his economy will plunge 11.2% this year, he had to think ahead, of things big and small – from getting cash to businesses still trying to get a foothold after the lockdown to getting school desks.In order to open in September, his country needs up to 3 million new desks, to replace old-fashioned double and triple desks so students can keep a proper distance.“We will have a great responsibility. With 209 billion euros, we have the possibility to relaunch Italy with strength, to change the face of the country. “After all, there are presidents among us.”Despite bruising confrontations with Ms. Now what?“The consequences will be historic,” French President Emmanuel Macron said. Macron and Ms. Loading… EU leaders prove ‘progress’ possible, set $2.1 trillion budget

European Union leaders agreed on a $2.1 trillion budget, including a $857 billion coronavirus relief fund, after one of their longest summits on record. Merkel added: “We have laid the financial foundations for the EU for the next seven years and came up with a response to this arguably biggest crisis of the European Union.”Despite Mr. Rutte maintained that “we have very good, warm relations.”Mr. What other political area in the world is capable of that? Merkel negotiating as the closest of partners, the traditionally powerful Franco-German alliance struggled for days to get the quarreling nations in line. None other,” Mr. Merkel and Mr. Stephanie Lecocq/AP

European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen (left) and European Council President Charles Michel bump elbows after a media conference in Brussels, July 21, 2020. Now we must hurry. What was planned as a two-day summit scheduled to end Saturday was forced into two extra days by deep ideological differences among the 27 leaders.The compromise deal they finally hammered out was one that Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban claimed as a victory.“We not just managed to get a good package of money, but we defended the pride of our nations and made clear that it is not acceptable that anybody, especially those who inherited … Macron said.At first, Ms. Macron, challenging anyone in the world who criticized the days of infighting to think of a comparable joint endeavor.“There are 27 of us around the table and we managed to come up with a joint budget. America has bungled the pandemic. But, even walking out of a negotiating session in protest together over the weekend, the two leaders bided their time and played their cards right in the end.“When Germany and France stand together, they can’t do everything. Macron wanted the grants to total 500 billion euros, but the so-called “frugals” – five wealthy northern nations led by the Netherlands – wanted a cut in such spending and strict economic reform conditions imposed. Macron said.The summit, at the urn-shaped Europa center, laid bare how nations’ narrow self-interests trumped the obvious common good for all to stand together and face a common adversary.Rarely had a summit been as ill-tempered as this one, and it was the longest since a five-day summit in Nice, France, in 2000, when safeguarding national interests in institutional reforms was a stumbling block.“There were extremely tense moments,” Mr. The figure was brought down to 390 billion euros, while the five nations also got guarantees on reforms.“There is no such thing as perfection, but we have managed to make progress,” Mr. July 21, 2020

By Raf Casert and Samuel Petrequin
Associated Press

Brussels
After four days and nights of wrangling, exhausted European Union leaders finally clinched a deal on an unprecedented $2.1 trillion budget and coronavirus recovery fund early Tuesday, after one of their longest summits ever.The 27 leaders grudgingly committed to a costly, massive aid package for those hit hardest by COVID-19, which has already killed 135,000 people within the bloc alone.With masks and hygienic gel everywhere at the summit, the leaders were constantly reminded of the potent medical and economic threat the virus poses.“Extraordinary events, and this is the pandemic that has reached us all, also require extraordinary new methods,” German Chancellor Angela Merkel said.To confront the biggest recession in its history, the EU will establish a 750 billion-euro coronavirus fund, partly based on common borrowing, to be sent as loans and grants to the hardest-hit countries. This is always what it’s about – finding compromises – and the EU always finds compromises,” he said. We must use this money for investments, for structural reforms,’’ Mr. Despite "extremely tense moments," the 27 leaders "managed to make progress," French President Emmanuel Macron said.

In African nations, it’s doubly hard for kids to distance-learn

Get the Monitor Stories you care about delivered to your inbox.
But many have been hindered by a lack of reliable electricity and poor internet connectivity. Ronald Kabuubi/AP

Stella Maris Basemera, a teacher and head of Uganda-based tutor group Creative Learning Africa, drafts worksheets that she’ll send to students via WhatsApp, in Kampala, Uganda, July 7, 2020. But electricity is often lacking in villages.”The potential of digital technology is enormous,” said Djibril Tall, a teacher in Senegal’s Louga region. Children “are completely helpless at the moment.”Although the pandemic has disrupted education across the globe, the schooling crisis is more acute in Africa, where up to 80% of students don’t have access to the internet and even electricity can be unreliable, making distance learning difficult, if not impossible. In African nations, it’s doubly hard for kids to distance-learn

Remote learning is especially difficult for young students in many African nations, where access to internet or electricity can be spotty. In Uganda, for instance, annual per capita income was less than $800 in 2019, according to World Bank data.Uganda’s government has pledged to distribute 10 million radios and over 130,000 solar-powered TV sets, but authorities have failed to honor past promises, including giving a free mask to everyone.In neighboring Kenya, primary and secondary schools will remain closed through 2020, although colleges and other institutions of higher learning can reopen in September. Teachers unions had warned that such a plan is dangerous in schools lacking face masks, hand sanitizer, and even running water.Even in South Africa, the continent’s most prosperous economy, the government has faced criticism from teachers unions for its decision to reopen schools despite a growing number of cases.Since schools there reopened in June, at least 650 students and teachers have tested positive in the province of Gauteng, the country’s economic hub, forcing 71 schools to close again.Many private schools across Africa are offering online tutoring. Michelsen Institute.The development research institute noted that school closures may deny students access to meals and health programs, and sometimes clean water and sanitation.Schools also provide havens for children from work and exploitation. Now what?But getting students back to school also comes with special challenges in Africa, where children in some countries may cram into tiny classrooms by the dozens.The charity Save the Children called the pandemic the “biggest global education emergency of our time” in a report published this week. They feel left out,” said Stella Maris Basemera, a mathematics teacher who heads a Uganda-based group of tutors called Creative Learning Africa. America has bungled the pandemic. Where will I get the money for these private lessons?” said Maud Chirwa, a mother in the Kuwadzana suburb of Zimbabwe’s capital, Harare. Many others cannot afford any support.”I can’t even afford to buy bread. culture and education agency. “They are better off at school where there are some controls.” “So some of them are going to run away from the profession.”In the West African nation of Senegal, education officials tried to keep children learning by broadcasting some classes on television after schools closed in March, a move aimed at reaching students without home internet access. Even newspapers into which learning materials are inserted are not affordable for many in the region. Loading… Girls may especially suffer, according to the literacy expert Nakabugo, who cited anecdotal reports of a growing number of teenage pregnancies – as the Norway-based institute’s report noted happened during West Africa’s Ebola epidemic.The prolonged shutdown could also mean many schools close for good and many teachers quit, exacerbating what is already the world’s worst teacher shortage.Media reports in Uganda cite school owners who are looking to sell their properties or have turned dorms into rental units to keep up with loan payments. Math problems in newspapers. Classes on Zoom or WhatsApp.The options for African students to keep studying while schools remain closed because of the coronavirus pandemic seem varied, but the reality for many is that they will fall behind and possibly drop out of school forever – worsening inequality on an already unequal continent.”I think education now is more of an emergency than the health issue,” said Dr. On top of missed education, closed schools means the loss of shelter, meals, and safety for many students. That means Kenyan pupils will repeat an academic year, a phenomenon commonly described as a “dead year.”But the effects will not be limited to academic disruption.”The critical consequences may be related to health, water, and nutrition” because schools are often oases of stability, according to a report by the Norway-based Chr. Mary Goretti Nakabugo, a literacy expert who runs a Uganda-based education nonprofit called Uwezo, noting that there have been no reported virus deaths and just over 1,000 cases in this East African country, though, as elsewhere, limited testing means those figures are likely undercounts. Schools also often provide a refuge to vulnerable children, offering services that their families cannot afford.Sub-Saharan Africa already has the highest rates of children out of school anywhere in the world, with nearly one-fifth of children between the ages of 6 and 11 and over one-third of youth between 12 and 14 not attending, according to the U.N. But in poor and rural areas, children are more likely to spend their days playing games or housekeeping.”It is the poorest schools that will continue to suffer and remain closed, while affluent schools reopen, only deepening inequality in both access to and quality of education,” said Dipolelo Moime, spokesman for One SA Movement, a group of South African activists.While some parents are paying hundreds of dollars a month for their children to attend online classes, others pay much less to teachers who conduct lessons in backyards. The local association of Ugandan teachers is urging authorities to employ furloughed teachers as village tutors.”The teachers are so discouraged at the moment. July 20, 2020

By Rodney Muhumuza
Associated Press

Kampala, Uganda
Lessons via radio or TV. Children in poor and rural areas often lack access to online resources. But “in many places people are forced to travel long distances just to have enough to charge their phones.”Some students in Senegal returned to classrooms in June, but, for many in Africa, returning to school may be tricky.In Zimbabwe, where in many schools up to 70 students may be crammed into a small room, the government is postponing a phased reopening that had been scheduled to begin this month. It identified 12 countries in which children “are at extremely high risk of dropping out forever.” Nine of them are in sub-Saharan Africa.With the help of outside groups, some African governments have announced measures to support learning from home.
It’s free. AP writers Babacar Dione in Dakar, Senegal; Farai Mutsaka in Harare, Zimbabwe; and Mogomotsi Magome in Johannesburg contributed to this report.Editor’s note: As a public service, the Monitor has removed the paywall   for all our coronavirus coverage. This story was reported by The Associated Press.
By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy.

Out of global upheaval, a new Olympic spirit

By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy.

“Athletes will no longer be silenced,” it wrote in a letter also signed by Mr. She has since done Zoom workouts with athletes in Chile, Italy, Portugal, Singapore, Spain, and the U.S., which she hopes to visit one day.Paula Ramírez of Spain, who was also part of the WhatsApp group, says it was amazing to get to know the Russian champions. McPherson, who has family serving in the Army and National Guard. “This is why athletes do not protest,” says Ms. As role models and often celebrities, they’re searching for the right balance between athletics and activism, with many addressing racism in more direct ways – including in their own sports.From having frank conversations with teammates to challenging the long-standing restrictions of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) on political expression, an increasing cadre of athletes is pushing back on the idea that the Olympic movement can or should be immune to issues convulsing society. Berry. Olympians find themselves navigating the world of politics as well as a pandemic. Olympic and Paralympic Committee, tweeted, “The USOPC stands with those who demand equality and equal treatment,” and linked to a letter she’d written to U.S. “It’s putting things in perspective – my problems are so small compared to other people’s.”With the Olympic Training Center closed in her home base of Colorado Springs, Colorado, she found ways to train in her apartment complex. Hirshland’s comments, Ms. team that Tokyo will be the most special Olympic Games ever if they don’t get canceled. “I also will continue to fight for equality and systemic change but through the use of my own means,” says Ms. As they peel themselves off in-home workout mats, many are doing so with heightened purpose, perseverance, and a global sense of camaraderie that they hope will inspire individuals and nations both during the current pandemic and when the Tokyo Games – postponed to 2021 – finally occur. For some U.S. Mr. Loading… Hirshland announced the creation of an athlete-led group “to challenge the rules and systems in our organization that create barriers to progress, including your right to protest.”Numerous athletes have called for the USOPC to lift Ms. Hirshland explained her decision but also apologized and heard out Ms. I think that can be the biggest mode of change that I can present at this point.”New voices for racial justiceMany athletes and sports administrators have been using their sizable social media platforms to support the protest movement in the wake of Mr. [But] in the end we want to compete with someone who is OK.”Ms. Her husband constructed a cable running from the top of their house down to the back fence. Tom Jacobs/Reuters

Following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease and the closure of training facilities, English athlete Desiree Henry trains at a golf course near London on April 26, 2020. Ramírez. No paywall. July 20, 2020

Two ways to read the story

Quick Read
Deep Read ( 13 Min. “I feel like in that way I’ve isolated someone like Gwen because I haven’t done the work with people I’m around to try and inform them and to allow them to see me fully,” says Ms. Ms. )

By Christa Case Bryant
Staff writer
@christacbryant

Under normal circumstances, the world’s best athletes would be meeting in Tokyo in late July in hopes of experiencing the pinnacle of what they’ve spent decades sweating and sacrificing for: standing on the Olympic podium, medals draped around their necks.Instead, they are coming off what may be the most bizarre few months of training in Olympic history, including international Zoom workouts. “When it was clear it was going to last a lot longer, I was like, ‘We have to get a little more serious about the home gym.’”

David Zalubowski/AP

Kara Winger uses a cable system to simulate throwing a javelin as she trains at home in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Ms. “It feels really good to be talking with them, ‘Are you OK, are you training?’” says Ms. Berry says she started receiving death threats. artistic swimming team, runs a global Zoom workout for athletes from her California living room. Rossi, who shared his workouts on Facebook and Instagram as a way of showing the possibility of getting something good out of quarantine. Jeff Swinger/USA Today

U.S. “We all had to sacrifice.”The trials of trainingOlympic slalom canoeist Sebastián Rossi had been training for months at the Pau-Pyrénées Whitewater Stadium in western France, hoping to qualify for the 2020 Olympics, when the pandemic forced him to return home to Buenos Aires, Argentina.All he had for water there was a swimming pool. Berry shot back with a tweet of her own: “I want an apology letter .. Winger, who initially used kettle bells and other small weights – as well as her yellow Lab, Maddie, who is trained to sit on her back while she’s doing planks. “I thought that was the pinnacle opportunity for me to let the world know where I stood and who I stood for,” says Ms. Rather, they hope it can become a channel for advancing social change and global unity.“It’s just tough because we’re dealing with racial injustice and a pandemic at the same time,” says Will Claye, a two-time Olympic silver medalist in triple jump based in San Diego. America has bungled the pandemic. And when he first found out the 2020 Tokyo Olympics would be postponed a year, he wrote a song with the chorus – “Dreams don’t die, they just multiply” – dedicated to all the athletes.“I think this Olympics will be one of the most prolific Olympics of all time,” he says, because it will be the coming together of nations after dealing with COVID-19, whether that meant not being able to train, losing a job, or knowing someone who died. Hall wrote.Mr. team coach is running the first-ever worldwide workout for artistic swimming (formerly known as synchronized swimming) on Zoom.More than 300 swimmers are following Ms. “The first thing that happens is your financial stability is taken away.”(Race Imboden, a fencer who is white and who knelt on the podium in Lima after his team won gold, was also put on yearlong probation.)After Ms. Courtesy of Samantha Schultz/@SAMANTHAAUSA (Instagram/Twitter)

U.S. Imboden’s probations, and to challenge the IOC’s Rule 50, which bans demonstrations and “political, religious or racial propaganda.”The IOC Athletes’ Commission introduced updated Rule 50 guidelines in January, which, while allowing athletes to express their views on social media and at press conferences, ruled out specific forms of protest such as kneeling, hand gestures, and the wearing of armbands. Under normal circumstances, the world’s best athletes would be meeting in Tokyo in late July in hopes of experiencing the pinnacle of what they’ve spent decades sweating and sacrificing for: standing on the Olympic podium, medals draped around their necks, as they listen to their national anthems and the rest of the world looks on rapturously.Instead, they are coming off what may be the most bizarre few months of training in Olympic history. Schultz, whom more people now recognize as their next-door Olympian. Carlos, the 1968 Olympian.“I’m extremely encouraged and extremely proud of a lot of athletes who may be risking a lot to change our country and change our communities for the greater good,” says Ms. So in addition to home-schooling his two young daughters and remodeling a home bathroom, he has pulled together a grant proposal for a shooting park in Fort Worth, Texas, to welcome more young athletes into the sport.Mr. “I definitely did not know what I was getting myself into.”The video went viral, and Ms. Hall, who wrote an essay for Runners World describing the profound impact the killing of Ahmaud Arbery, a young Black man who was shot while jogging through a Georgia town, has had on her. Ducking under her extended calf, she asks, “Can you see me?”“Yeah, we see you perfect!” exclaims four-time Olympic medalist Andrea Fuentes from her California living room, where the Spanish champion-turned-U.S. As a Black man who has experienced racial profiling and discrimination and tense encounters with police, he wants to give others insight into such issues. A set of transportable parallel bars helps her work on shoulder stability, and she has a new weightlifting bench, which he welded and upholstered.In addition to the training challenges, the quarantine has prompted some athletes to reflect on their role in society.Two-time Olympic gold medalist Vincent Hancock, who qualified for his fourth Summer Games in skeet shooting just before the shutdown, has long been wanting to have a greater impact. “Even though it was good to keep fit, for the head it was really important to be able to do 45 minutes in the swimming pool. Berry says there’s no way that athletes’ individual struggles, shaped by their different backgrounds and demographics, can be washed away with “fairy tales and roses” at the Olympics.“I’m hopeful that the Olympic Games reflect where we are as a country,” says Ms. I think that’s my purpose.”

Kirby Lee/USA Today

Will Claye, a two-time Olympic silver medalist in the triple jump, says he has faced racism since he was a child. For three months, instead of working out in a whitewater stadium, with its rapids and cascading pools, he’d head out to the pool for 45-minute sessions, paddling vigorously to maintain his strength and balance as fall turned into winter in the Southern Hemisphere. “We really want to compete with them and beat them. Army Marksmanship Unit, believes sports can help turn lives around.“What I’m doing by creating this shooting park is showing people that they can do and accomplish anything they can set their mind to,” he says. While training for the Tokyo Games, he has spoken at an NAACP rally and participated in a town hall meeting where athletes pushed for greater political expression. Hall, who would like to see the Tokyo media coverage showcase more nuanced tales of triumph. Hall, who attended high school outside her district in a largely white area of New Jersey in order to be able to run track, details in her essay how a mother asked her coach whether one of her parents was white – searching for an explanation for her discipline and focus, which the woman didn’t associate with Black families, Ms. Platanioti of Greece, who spent a month organizing the May 3 worldwide workout via a WhatsApp chat group, which gave them an opportunity to get to know each other as friends rather than just competitors. Her husband wasn’t into fencing with her – “he doesn’t really like being a pincushion,” she says – so she parried with a tennis ball, hung on a string in her garage, to refine her footwork. modern pentathlete Samantha Schultz does Pilates in the Colorado outdoors as part of her training. Claye, the triple jumper, says he’s been followed in stores ever since he was a child in Arizona, sees women clutch their purses when they pass him, is frequently asked if he’s in the wrong seat when flying business class, and has had police draw guns on him “for no reason.”And Paige McPherson, a Black athlete adopted by a white couple in South Dakota, relates having a neighbor threaten to shoot her and her Black sister if they ventured onto his property.“I choose to be the bigger person than those that deem me as different because of my black skin,” says Ms. “My parents instilled in me to be strong in my own being, kind to others, and forgiving, as the Bible says.” She has spoken out on social media against Breonna Taylor’s killing, marched in a Miami prayer walk, and says she understands her fellow athletes’ decisions to protest because of their desire to stop the injustices in America.But, she adds, the national anthem and raising of the flag is a very delicate subject and has many different meanings to people across the nation. “They have given their lives to protect and serve our country, which is something I respect and support.”With the nation’s upheaval playing out in sports as well as on the streets, the usual made-for-TV vignettes about athletes’ path to victory – accompanied by dramatic music and soft, dreamy cinematography – may come across as incongruous. “Seeing whole, full people and acknowledging them doesn’t mean we can’t enjoy people doing incredible things and breaking barriers.”

Boston
Evangelia Platanioti presses her palms and toes into the blue exercise mat in a pushup position, then nonchalantly brings her right leg past her head. On plush carpets and sun-drenched terraces, they spend 1 1/2 hours copying the movements of more than two dozen of the best athletes in the sport, beamed via a laptop or phone into their homes. Floyd’s killing as well.On June 2, Sarah Hirshland, chief executive officer of the U.S. Berry’s and Mr. Meanwhile, some 6,000 viewers watch live, leaving a running commentary filled with emoji and frequent invocations of their favorite champion’s name followed by “YAAASSSSSS.”Welcome to being an Olympian in quarantine. “The pandemic [brought] us together like one team – like a world team,” says artistic swimmer Svetlana Kolesnichenko of Russia, a two-time world champion who trains more than 10 hours a day and rarely interacts with other athletes at competitions. “So they can see someone who truly loves and is passionate about what they do. She recalls people telling her to “go back to Africa, go back where you came from.” She also lost 80% of her sponsorship income, which included a major reduction in a USA Track & Field Foundation grant that she had received for years. It explained that “the example we set by competing with the world’s best while living in harmony in the Olympic Village is a uniquely positive message to send to an increasingly divided world.”In late June, the USOPC’s Athletes’ Advisory Council demanded that the rule be abolished. YouTube

Olympic medalist Andrea Fuentes of Spain, who now coaches the U.S. McPherson, an Olympic bronze medalist in taekwondo. The Spanish team also bonded with the Italians, their closest rivals, as both countries were struggling with COVID-19. stop playing with me.”In a phone call between the two women facilitated by USA Track & Field CEO Max Siegel, Ms. In a spring survey of athletes, coaches, and other Olympic figures from 135 countries, the IOC found that 56% of athletes were having difficulty training effectively, while fully half were struggling with motivation. Berry, later tweeting: “Gwen has a powerful voice in this national conversation.” Several days later, Ms. … They’re pushing back on the idea that the Olympic movement, which has long banned political expression, can or should be immune to issues convulsing society.“I’m hopeful that the Olympic Games reflect where we are as a country,” says Marielle Hall, a Black long-distance runner who would like to see the Tokyo media coverage showcase more nuanced tales of triumph. “I won’t go in a swimming pool ever again, even in the summer,” he jokes of his endless time in camp chlorine.Now that he’s back in the gym and outside in the water in Argentina, he realizes the pool sessions made him stronger – and not just physically.“I saw it like mental training mostly,” says Mr. “Hopefully I am the cool neighbor with a sword and the laser pistol.”Across town, javelin thrower Kara Winger and her husband, former discus thrower Russell Winger, have designed an elaborate backyard setup to help her prepare for her fourth Olympic Games.“The first month of quarantine was much more low-key as far as working out at home,” says Ms. Platanioti’s lead from Austria to New Zealand, where it is 3 a.m. From employees juggling jobs and child care to children whose plans for summer camp were dashed, people in all walks of life were having to find creative ways to stay motivated and maintain their equilibrium.“There’s so many people who are struggling right now, and I’m worried because I don’t have a pool to swim in?” pentathlete Samantha Schultz remembers thinking, as she tried to figure out how to continue training for her sport’s five disciplines – swimming, shooting, fencing, running, and equestrian show jumping. “Seeing whole, full people and acknowledging them doesn’t mean we can’t enjoy people doing incredible things and breaking barriers.”Tight bonds among athletesIn many sports, there’s long been a camaraderie among athletes that stretches across borders. Fuentes, the U.S. “I’m definitely not alone anymore.”For Olympic 10,000-meter runner Marielle Hall, the sole Black runner on her women’s distance team at a track club in Oregon, Ms. Now, such esprit de corps is being heightened thanks to COVID-19, from a fun video that international pentathletes collaborated on to the worldwide artistic swimming workout. Berry, who adds that she likely will have to start working soon to make ends meet – maybe at a mall near her home in Houston, or as a personal assistant to an executive. Hancock once hosted a Chinese skeet shooter who came to train with him and his father in Georgia, and the whole Chinese team later came to Texas, where he took them to a steakhouse. David J. During the pandemic, her workouts have included fencing with a dangling tennis ball in her garage and shooting targets with a laser gun in the driveway. “What I can do is put together my network, resources – all the blessings I’ve been given – and use it to inspire people, use it to give people knowledge, and use it to make change. Olympic & Paralympic town hall, where athletes pushed for greater political expression. mailed   .. Out of global upheaval, a new Olympic spirit

Why We Wrote This

Many athletes believe the Tokyo Games will be one of the most meaningful Olympics in history, as a pandemic and tumult surrounding social justice spur athletes to rethink their roles in society. In a move that would defy the czarinas of Twister, she proceeds to lift her back foot off the ground and balances a midair split on – get this – one bent elbow.“Hold on this pose,” says the Greek Olympian into the camera, as her country’s flag flutters in the background. hammer thrower Gwen Berry was put on probation for raising a fist to highlight racial justice issues at last year’s Pan American Games. artistic swimming coach, told her young U.S. It makes you tough.”  

Agustin Marcarian/Reuters

Argentine canoeist Sebastián Rossi devised a novel way to train in a swimming pool while in isolation to prepare for the postponed Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games. Hancock, who once served in the U.S. for workouts. Now, as they peel themselves off in-home workout mats and head back to the gym or pool, many are doing so with heightened purpose, perseverance, and a global sense of camaraderie that they hope will inspire individuals and nations emerging from COVID-19 lockdowns. Claye spent the spring mixing creative workouts on a mini-trampoline with efforts such as encouraging young people at an NAACP rally to vote and speaking up at a U.S. She says she thinks about it every day, on every run.Black Olympians, who brought home more than a third of Team USA’s 2016 gold medal haul, tell of numerous racial incidents they’ve experienced. Add in the upheaval surrounding a white policeman’s killing of George Floyd and COVID-19’s disproportionate impact on minority communities, and U.S. He repurposed a small metal pipe from a cupcake stand he built for their wedding to serve as a “javelin” she could throw up the cable to simulate the action required in competition. She would also do target practice in her driveway, startling neighbors, she surmises, who didn’t realize that what looked like an oversized pistol was actually a laser gun.“I’m sure some people do double takes when they drive by,” says Ms. athletes.That didn’t sit well with Gwen Berry, one of the best hammer throwers in the world. They came face-to-face with 30-ounce tomahawk steaks. Ms. Schultz says with four- to five-day competitions, the worldwide pentathlon community is quite close. The U.S. Olympic taekwondo medalist Paige McPherson), who once had a white neighbor threaten to kill her, says she strives to forgive when confronted by racism and will continue to fight for equality and systemic change, but in her own way. Phillip/AP

U.S. athletes, that includes tackling racial injustice more directly in the wake of George Floyd’s killing. just like you and the IOC MAILED ME WHEN YOU PUT ME ON PROBATION .. Berry’s ordeal was something of a wake-up call – a recognition of the need to speak openly about her own experience, which she had been hesitant to do before. team has trained in Germany and Poland, and Egypt and Japan came to the U.S. Berry, who grew up in Ferguson, Missouri, and marched with those protesting the 2014 killing of Michael Brown, a Black 18-year-old, by a white police officer who was never indicted. She was one of more than two dozen athletes, including Ms. But among the dozen-plus athletes interviewed by the Monitor, many recognized that the challenges they faced were not unique to them. After winning gold at the Pan American Games last August, she had been put on yearlong probation by the USOPC for raising her fist toward the end of “The Star-Spangled Banner” in a salute reminiscent of Tommie Smith and John Carlos at the 1968 Olympics. While looking at the palm trees on the edge of the property one day, he had a crazy idea: tether the back of his boat to the tree trunks using a long rubber strap made from the tubes of bicycle tires, and then paddle in the pool against the resistance. Mr. Now what?Editor’s note: As a public service,   all our coronavirus coverage   is free.
Get the Monitor Stories you care about delivered to your inbox.
It will be a historical moment.”Staff writer Sara Miller Llana contributed to this report from Toronto. “It will be very symbolic and it will mean that humanity got over the virus,” she says. “It will be the first time the world will be united after the whole episode.

EU leaders face choice: Build unity or present ‘a weak Europe’

By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy.
Get the Monitor Stories you care about delivered to your inbox.
Macron, Italy, and Hungary, whose Prime Minister Viktor Orban asked why the Dutchman had such “hate” toward him.Mr. Michel said.The pandemic has sent the EU into a tailspin, killing around 135,000 of its citizens and plunging its economy into an estimated contraction of 8.3% this year.The bloc’s executive has proposed a 750 billion-euro coronavirus fund, partly based on common borrowing, to be sent as loans and grants to the countries hit hardest by the pandemic. Orban’s anger. July 20, 2020

By Raf Casert and Sam Petrequin
Associated Press

Brussels
Weary and bleary, European Union leaders on Monday geared up for a fourth day of fighting over an unprecedented $2.1 trillion EU budget and coronavirus recovery fund, barely recovered from a weekend of walkouts, fists slamming into tables, and insults.With a brilliant sun warming the negotiating sundeck at the Europa summit center early Monday, there finally was a glimmer of hope that the talks to help the continent emerge from the pandemic through an unprecedented economic aid package aren’t doomed after all.It took a heart-tugging dinner speech by European Council President Charles Michel about leaders not failing their union, French President Emmanuel Macron slamming his fist in anger into the table, and a new set of budgetary numbers to send this already epic summit onward.“There were extremely tense moments. But on content, things have moved forward,” said Mr. Merkel negotiating as the closest of partners, the traditionally powerful Franco-German alliance could not get the quarreling nations in line.At their dinner table Sunday night, the leaders mulled a proposal from the five wealthy northern nations that suggested a coronavirus recovery fund with 350 billion euros of grants and the same amount again in loans. We are here because we do business for our own country. And there will be more that no doubt will still be difficult. EU leaders face choice: Build unity or present ‘a weak Europe’

Calling on EU leaders to build "unity and trust," a heart-tugging speech by the European council president sparked a glimmer of hope as EU leaders entered the fourth day of negotiations over a $2.1 trillion budget and coronavirus relief fund. The five have been pushing for labor market and pension reforms to be linked to EU handouts and a “brake” enabling EU nations to monitor and, if necessary, halt projects that are being paid for by the recovery fund.“He can’t ask us to do specific reforms,” Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte said. The EU has never taken momentous steps without Franco-German agreement. Merkel and French President Emmanuel Macron. Macron and Ms. Without Franco-German agreement, the EU has never taken momentous steps.“An extraordinary situation demands extraordinary efforts,” Ms. Budget negotiations depend partly on the partnership between Ms. Loading… That comes on top of the seven-year 1 trillion-euro EU budget that leaders had been haggling over for months even before the pandemic hit.Even with Mr. We are all pros,” he said.On Sunday night, after three days of fruitless talks and with hope dimming, Mr. Macron, stressing his continued partnership with German Chancellor Angela Merkel. America has bungled the pandemic. Francois Lenoir/AP

German Chancellor Angela Merkel arrives for an EU summit in Brussels, July 20, 2020. Rutte, defending the cause of a group of five wealthy northern nations – the Netherlands, Austria, Finland, Sweden, and Denmark – sought to limit costs and impose strict reform guarantees on any rescue plan for needy nations. Mr. He came under criticism from Mr. Rutte and others also wants a link to be made between the handout of EU funds and the rule of law – a connection aimed at Poland and Hungary, countries with right-wing populist governments that many in the EU think are sliding away from democratic rule.That drew Mr. Now what?Overall, spirits had picked up since the talks reached rock bottom Sunday night.“It looks more hopeful than when I thought during the night: ‘It’s over,’” said Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte, the target of much of criticism for keeping a compromise impossible.Mr. Michel implored leaders to overcome their fundamental divisions and agree on the budget and recovery fund.“Are the 27 EU leaders capable of building European unity and trust or, because of a deep rift, will we present ourselves as a weak Europe, undermined by distrust,” he asked the leaders.“I wish that we succeed in getting a deal and that the European media can headline tomorrow that the EU succeeded in a Mission Impossible,” Mr. The five EU nations – nicknamed “the frugals” – had long opposed any grants at all, while the EU executive had proposed 500 billion euros.The latest compromise proposal stands at 390 billion euros in grants.All nations in principle agree they need to band together but the five richer countries in the north, led by the Netherlands, want strict controls on spending, while struggling southern nations like Spain and Italy say those conditions should be kept to a minimum. It was planned as a two-day summit scheduled to have ended Saturday, but deep ideological differences between the 27 leaders forced the talks into two extra days. Rutte took it in stride.“We are not here because we are going to be visitors at each other’s birthday party later. Merkel said as the leaders were heading into one of the bloc’s longest summits ever.

This story was reported by The Associated Press.Editor’s note: As a public service, the Monitor has removed the paywall   for all our coronavirus coverage. It’s free.