Genius azelyrics.net.ru Lyrics

Genius azelyrics.net.ru .Lyrics

Hillsong Worship – King Of Kings Lyrics

[Verse 1]
In the darkness we were waiting
Without hope, without light
Till from heaven You came running
There was mercy in Your eyes
To fulfill the law and prophets
To a virgin came the word
From a throne of endless glory
To a cradle in the dirt

[Chorus]
Praise the Father, praise the Son
Praise the Spirit, three in one
God of glory, Majesty
Praise forever to the King of Kings

[Verse 2]
To reveal the kingdom coming
And to reconcile the lost
To redeem the whole creation
You did not despise the cross
For even in your suffering
You saw to the other side
Knowing this was our salvation
Jesus for our sake you died

[Chorus]
Praise the Father, praise the Son
Praise the Spirit, three in one
God of glory, Majesty
Praise forever to the King of Kings

[Verse 3]
And the morning that You rose
All of heaven held its breath
Till that stone was moved for good
For the Lamb had conquered death
And the dead rose from their tombs
And the angels stood in awe
For the souls of all who’d come
To the Father are restored

[Verse 4]
And the church of Christ was born
Then the Spirit lit the flame
Now this gospel truth of old
Shall not kneel, shall not faint
By His blood and in His name
In His freedom I am free
For the love of Jesus Christ
Who has resurrected me

[Chorus]
Praise the Father, praise the Son
Praise the Spirit, three in one
God of glory, Majesty
Praise forever to the King of Kings

[Outro]
Praise forever to the King of Kings

God Module – Deceit Lyrics

Inside a white room chained to the floor
Looks like you’ll be here a while just like the time before

Together I thought we could ascend
The explosions in the sky from the wars of men

But it was all a lie
That was the only explanation that i can believe in
Part of me died when you cried
When I told you the truth
That I could never love you again

Rejoice in your despair
As we celebrate our broken lives that we can’t repair

Our story will be written in blood
We sleep beside the serpent in the wake of the flood

Why did you lie?
You were the closest thing to god that I ever needed
You saw it in my eyes when you cried
When you told me the truth
That you could never love me again

Daryl Coley – Real Lyrics

[Chorus: Daryl Coley]
Real, real, Jesus is real to me
Oh, yes, he gives me victory
So many, many people doubt him
I can not live without him
That is why I love him so
He’s so real to me

[Chorus: Daryl Coley (Vocalists)]
He’s real (Real)
He’s real (Real)
Jesus (Real) is real to me (Me)
Oh (Oh) Oh, yea (Yes)
He gives me victory
(So many people doubt him) So many people doubt him
(But I can’t live without him)
And that is why (That is why I love him so)
Because (He’s so real to me)

[Bridge: Daryl Coley (Vocalists)]
Now you’ll ask me how I know that the Lord is real
Well I’m gonna tell you he’s real in my heart
(I’ve thought of many things he’s brought me through)
(He’s done for me what no one else could do)
(I come today to tell you)

[Chorus: Daryl Coley (Vocalists) ((All))]
He’s real (Real)
He’s real (Real)
Jesus (Real) is real to me (Me)

Oh (Oh) Oh yea (Yes)
He gives me the victory
((So many people doubt him))
((But I can’t live without him))
((That is why I love him so))
((‘Cause He’s so real to me))

[Vamp 1]
The Lord is real, real, real
I come to let you know he’s real
I want you to know he’s real, real
You can’t make me doubt him
I know too much about him
You can’t make me doubt him
‘Cause I know too much about him
He’s real, real, real, real, real, real
He’s real, real, real, real, real, real

[Vamp 2]
I woke up this morning to a new dawn and
He spoke to me sweetly said, Lo I am with thee
He’s real, real, real, real
Oh he’s real, he’s real, he’s real, he’s real
I know that he’s real

[Outro: ((All))]
((So many people doubt him))
((But I can’t live without him))
((That is why I love him so))
((‘Cause He’s so real to me))

Natanael Cano – Waxesito Lyrics

[Letra de “Waxesito”]

[Verso 1]
Con la bonga por un lado y un waxesito
Para andar alterado o calmado
Con un gallo me relajo en la playa
O en la chamba kushareando me la paso
Pelos rojos o morados con un RAW bien enrollado
Paniqueado y volando

[Coro]
Lo mejor de todo esto
El mal viaje que te pegan los hermanos, yo lo extraño
Y si ven mis ojos rojos no se asusten, pues de mí no tengan miedo
Y si me miran contento es que tiro humito al viento

[Interludio]

¡Ea!

[Verso 2]
Unas rolas para el viaje, el Alemán que nunca falte
Y una dama pa’ bailarla
Con mis homies en la casa quemando cajeta blanca
Y si se pasan se alivianan
Pelos rojos o morados con un RAW bien enrollado
Paniqueado y volando

[Coro]
Lo mejor de todo esto
El mal viaje que te pegan los hermanos, yo lo extraño
Y si ven mis ojos rojos no se asusten, pues de mí no tengan miedo
Y si me miran contento, es que tiro humito al cielo

Idir – Cfiy Lyrics

Cfigh amzun d idelli
Mi d yewwed ujrad tara
Ccerq lgherb ye’teggir
Adrum ur yezmir ara

Nek terrid’ iyi gher dduh’
A yemma ur ‘tisgh ara
Cfigh temuted’ d ihin
Ghef tzurin b ufrara
Tennid’ asmi d lulagh
Aadawn ur agh bghin ara
Yesi tferh’ed’ mi muqregh
Tugh am teftilt di l’hara
Cfigh amzun d idelli

Ghef signa mi g ghum aggur
Acekal yeghli di zznad
Tamurt itcat unaghur

Tmuqeled dgi a yemma
Walagh ulim amek itccur
Tennid iyi ketc a mmi
Tah’bult g irden mi tnur

Twesad’ iyi ghef gma
Ad bedegh ghurs ad yemghur
At afagh gher tuyat iw
Ur nesai tagmat me’hqur

Tom Macdonald – Blame The Rappers Lyrics (feat. Dax)

[Verse 1: Tom MacDonald]
I’m rapper but I’m losing my respect for the genre
How many songs about Xanax and alcohol are we dropping?
How many kids we gonna kill ‘for we admit it’s a problem?
Probly stop if was one of our sons or one of our daughters
We know our demographic is primarily youth
We glorify breaking the law to children in school
Kids copy what we say and imitate what we do
They’ll go to jail for doing the things you told em was cool
We put women in our videos, exploiting their bodies
While little girls around the world look at they phone while they watch it
They need a realistic role model, not just a Barbie
They see strippers and escorts but no lawyers or doctors
Hey Hip-Hop, what the hell happened?
It was power to the people, and we liked that stuff
These days you’re promoting thats it’s fun to be an addict, so I’m askin, how could you write that bruh?

[Hook]
You can blame the rappers
That you blow up
But your favourite songs are about doing drugs
So what happens after
These kids grow up
And who’s to blame for who they’ve become
They made it look so cool
To shoot those guns
And hate the cops
And to get too drunk
You can’t blame the rappers
When you show up
And love the songs
That make you dumb

[Verse 2: Dax]
Making music privilege and choice
And if you ever get to be successful you must understand the people that you influence are Swayed by what you say and that melodies and you sing make wings, building dreams, and fill voids
We are medication straight through voice, some give life , some destroy
And even though this money seems nice it can’t come so we must that as hint that there’s other things in life you should enjoy
We move mountains
We cross states
We play roles in presidential debates
So don’t you try and tell me making music is for fun and you don’t care about the things that our music help make
Man I know I’m not perfect
But I’ll change
I’m the outcome of the worlds and my pain
And this music is pills and I promise this dose that you take won’t make you say

[Hook]
You can blame the rappers
That you blow up
But your favourite songs are about doing drugs

So what happens after
These kids grow up
And who’s to blame for who they’ve become
They made it look so cool
To shoot those guns
And hate the cops
And to get too drunk
You can’t blame the rappers
When you show up
And love the songs
That make you dumb

[Verse 3: Tom MacDonald]
I’m a rapper but I swear that I’m embarrassed
Half of these artists can’t even talk, they just mumble the lyrics
And the teenagers listen while they rebel from their parents
While the rappers tell ‘em pop a pill, buy Gucci and wear it
We say screw the police, break the rules, smoke weed
By some shoes you don’t need, rep the hood and yo street
All these rappers holdin’ guns and now the kids want some
Mess around and kill they homie, you can’t clean that blood
We encourage being stupid with our music, and we’re normalizing poor morals standard while do it
Little boys see the way that the women look in our videos and assume it’s real-life, project that image on little girls
It’s un-realistic, if you’re young and you listen, you are one in a million, you are loved, you are different
Hey Hip-Hop, I know life moves on
But while I’m here, how could you write that, dawg?

[Hook]
You can blame the rappers
That you blow up
But your favourite songs are about doing drugs
So what happens after
These kids grow up
And who’s to blame for who they’ve become
They made it look so cool
To shoot those guns
And hate the cops
And to get too drunk
You can’t blame the rappers
When you show up
And love the songs
That make you dumb

[Bridge: Tom MacDonald]
Dollar bills and poppin’ pulls like party songs
It’s not cool in real life
Cheap thrills and goin’ till the morning comes
See what that feels like

[Hook]
You can blame the rappers
That you blow up
But your favourite songs are about doing drugs
So what happens after
These kids grow up
And who’s to blame for who they’ve become
They made it look so cool
To shoot those guns
And hate the cops
And to get too drunk
You can’t blame the rappers
When you show up
And love the songs
That make you dumb

Virus – Juegos Incompletos Lyrics

[Letra de “Juegos Incompletos”]

[Verso 1]
Me sonreís, me observas
Decís que sí, después te vas
Que bien jugás, sos colosal
A lo mejor vas a ganar

Aburrida, extra chata, primitiva
Eso es lo que sos
Transparente, insegura
Ni siquiera me inspiras rencor

[Verso 2]
Y otra vez vuelvo a jugar
Pongo la ficha en su lugar
Ya sé mejor a donde voy
Y lo que quiero para hoy

[Coro]
Me divierto, me enloquezco
Pero siento insatisfacción
Estos juegos incompletos
Me desgastan la imaginación

[Instrumental]

[Verso 2]
Y otra vez vuelvo a jugar
Pongo la ficha en su lugar
Ya sé mejor a donde voy
Y lo que quiero para hoy

[Coro]
Me divierto, me enloquezco
Pero siento insatisfacción
Estos juegos incompletos
Me desgastan la imaginación

[Instrumental]

[Coro]
Me divierto, me enloquezco
Pero siento insatisfacción
Estos juegos incompletos
Me desgastan la imaginación

Me divierto, me enloquezco
Pero siento insatisfacción
Estos juegos incompletos
Me desgastan la imaginación

Me divierto, me enloquezco
Pero siento insatisfacción
Estos juegos incompletos
Me desgastan la imaginación

Me divierto, me enloquezco
Pero siento insatisfacción
Estos juegos incompletos
Me desgastan la imaginación

Fiend – All In A Week Lyrics (feat. O’Dell)

(talking)
What up world, this your people, the Excited Private
Fiend, better known as Sleepy Eyed Jones
I got a question to ask you, and understand me on this one
If life is a blessing, and truly a gift
Why in the hell it could end so quick
It could happen all in a week, knowI’msaying
Check this out

[Fiend]
Monday morning waking up before I brush my dogs
Loading clips to the tip why, cause haters test balls
Smoke a cess to ease it all, but I got to face pain
Push come to shove and I will, release flames
There’s a war on these streets, it’s the beginning of the week
Came night fall, a couple of bodies had to leak
A couple hotties had to beat them in, died a snitch
Lied in a ditch, they tried not to cry like a bitch
The eye witness, seen it all, but mouth stayed closed
Stayed at home praying, as tears drop from my nose
Suppose it was your boys, would you ride nine Tuesday
Grabbing whatever’s spent even the old school uzi
Usually wouldn’t be caught, doing these wrong deeds
Wednesday, wanna know, they done f*cked with the wrong breed
My girl Chrissy said Fiend, why you wear a vest
Besides the life I live girl the streets is a mess, it happened all in a week

(Chorus: O’Dell vocalizing in background)
If life is a blessing, and truly a gift
Why in the hell it could end so quick
If you thinking the streets is bad, is really a myth
You’d be surprised what your ass might get

[Fiend]
Now, came Thursday, yeah my dog Rover his
The devil called who in the f*ck taking care of them four kids
The more I did, with a firm grip, I couldn’t shake the thoughts

I tried to drink the pain away, enough liquor wasn’t bought
Saw some good news, like a quest for some gold
My girl sleeped with that other day, bless her soul
Glock I hold, got paper, wrapping niggas for nothing
Plus I’m tripping on these hoes, and get it all done with something
Blunting, to keep my composer, No Limit Soldier
Trouble seems to find me, in the Navi or the Rover
f*ck being sober, it ain’t the weekend yet
Plus some jackers tried to follow, me and Serv in the Vet

(Chorus)

[Fiend]
Probably even tripping how them boys, chase the wealth
Followed to I 10 them boys sure killed theyself
Hell, been not feeling a thang, behind mine
In search of being heard they surely don’t mind dying
Picture, what happens, in time on this day
Chronic got me wanting to sleep on the sixth day
Mix playing the N.Y., Vix paying the N.O
Both, your niggas drinking, blowing some indo
Send for, Saturday, that’s when the Cali play
Over that a-way, a man stand in the alley way
Make it to the club, f*ck, he popping lips
Hit him, I got that torch straw anxious at my hip
Shit got thick, and real niggas had to leave
I went throwing heat, like I was in the major league
Shit, ready for combat including the gun play
The priest gone be tripping come confessions on Sunday

(Chorus – 2x)

(talking)
Better yet on our world, knowI’msaying
Understand it could happen all in a week
This for Fiend and No Limit to the world
Understand, live your life nigga

Pandemic stress overshadows US election for this young Latina voter

Pandemic stress overshadows US election for this young Latina voter

By
Esmy Jimenez

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Michelle Aguilar Ramirez, 17, is a a young Latina in Washington state who will vote for the first time in November. 

Credit:

Courtesy of Michelle Aguilar Ramirez

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This story is part of “Every 30 Seconds,” a collaborative public media reporting project tracing the young Latino electorate leading up to the 2020 presidential election and beyond.

The “new normal” is uncomfortable for Michelle Aguilar Ramirez, and countless other young people who are self-isolating because of the coronavirus pandemic. She’s a 17-year old Guatemalan American high school junior in Kent, Washington.

Washington state was initially the epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak in the US. Now, as cases have declined, officials are moving toward reopening certain areas of the state. 

Related: How a trip to Honduras shaped one young US Afro Latino voter’s identity

For Aguilar Ramirez, the last two months of the stay-at-home orders have been slow and challenging.

“Staying in quarantine has really messed with my mental health,” she said. “I haven’t had the opportunity to socialize with other individuals except for the people I live with. I haven’t had the opportunity to really feel happy, in a way.” 

The distractions of spending all her waking hours in a crowded house while adjusting to taking her classes online have kept Aguilar Ramirez from staying up-to-date with the presidential election in November. It will be the first time she will be eligible to vote.

Related: Coronavirus upended her family. But this Latina teen is determined to make her vote count.

“I’m not keeping myself posted with all the news that’s coming out, whether it’s political, or whether it’s about the elections. Because it’s just draining and overwhelming.”

Michelle Aguilar Ramire, 17, first-time voter in November

“I’m not keeping myself posted with all the news that’s coming out, whether it’s political, or whether it’s about the elections,” she said. “Because it’s just draining and overwhelming.”

She’s not the only one that feels that way. Attention to the US election has waned — and with good reason. For now, young people like Aguilar Ramirez are worried about more immediate and pressing concerns such as making rent, their health and what their futures hold. 

“I’ll probably start keeping myself posted on certain [news], but as of now, I could care less about that because I’m just busy with my own things with my mental health, my physical health and with academics,” she said. “I know that’s bad on my behalf. But that’s the best that I can do.” 

Related: This Latino teen voter worries about prom, graduation — and the economy

While in quarantine, she has continued to take Running Start college courses and her high school classes online. 

“I honestly truly hate it,” she said of her virtual classroom. “I don’t know how much I can express how much I hate digital learning.” 

Her internet connection at home isn’t strong, so she struggles to connect with her professors or classmates over Zoom, the videoconferencing app. It’s also hard to keep track of her work deadlines. 

Every day feels eerily the same since she’s been isolating. And when it’s not the Wi-Fi going down, it’s distractions from her family. 

“I don’t have a specific space where I can do my homework at peace with no noise whatsoever,” Aguilar Ramirez said. She lives with eight other people at home — including extended family. 

“Anytime in the day everyone is watching TV, there’s an Xbox, there’s like YouTube going on on the tablet or Fortnite,” she said. “So much noise!” 

To listen to the full story, click the play button in the audio player above. 

South Korean high school seniors are eager to return to the classroom

South Korean high school seniors are eager to return to the classroom

By
Jason Strother

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A teacher gives an online class at school, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Seoul, South Korea, April 9, 2020. 

Credit:

Heo Ran/Reuters 

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South Korean high school seniors will be the first students to return to the classroom after the coronavirus delayed the start of the academic year. For many, the pandemic didn’t just disrupt their education; it cast their entire futures into uncertainty. 

On Wednesday, schools across the country will partially reopen to allow students in their final year of primary education to resume in-person learning. A large COVID-19 outbreak in February forced the government to postpone the start of the school year, which typically begins in March, by several weeks. And last month, all students began receiving online instruction. 

Related: South Korea flattened the curve. Now what?

South Korea’s Education Ministry said in a press release that it will reopen schools just for seniors due to their “urgent academic needs.” Students in lower grade levels will gradually return to schools in the upcoming weeks.

Classes were set to resume on May 13, but a cluster infection detected earlier this month in Seoul, the capital, prompted officials to extend school closures by an additional week.   

Some seniors, like Jung Ujin, who studies video production at a specialized high school in Seoul, say they can’t wait much longer to get back into the classroom, despite lingering health concerns posed by the epidemic. Jung explains that virtual classes can’t prepare students for the tests and other requirements they need to gain acceptance into good universities and she feels like the delay has made her “fall behind” in her studies. 

“We are panicking because we haven’t been able to go to school. I feel like I am at a disadvantage now. I really feel like I am in a hurry to get back to class.”

Jung Ujin, high school senior in Seoul

“We are panicking because we haven’t been able to go to school,” the 18-year old says. “I feel like I am at a disadvantage now. I really feel like I am in a hurry to get back to class.” 

The third and final year of high school in South Korea is almost entirely devoted to preparing for a university entrance examination known as the suneung. It’s widely considered the most important test a Korean will ever take and determines the trajectory of one’s academic and professional career.  

Now, because of the delays and imposition of online learning brought on by the coronavirus, many high school seniors say they intend to double down on studying so to make up for this lost and valuable time — as if the rest of their lives depended on it. 

Related: Is South Korea’s approach to containing coronavirus a model? 

Park Ji-yun says the coronavirus will make achieving her educational and career goals more difficult. 

Credit:

Jason Strothers/The World 

“Whatever I decide to major in or whatever career I want to pursue will now be more difficult,” says Park Ji-yun, 17, adding it was difficult to avoid distraction while taking her school’s online lessons. “I don’t think I’ve been able to prepare enough to go to university and I need to do a lot more studying now.”  

Park, who intends to study tourism in college, says she plans to rewatch online lectures and study more with her classmates to compensate for this “setback” in her education. 

To allow students more time to prepare for the suneung, the Education Ministry has pushed back the test date from Nov. 19 to Dec. 3. 

Some observers say the coronavirus epidemic is putting added stress on students from this year’s graduating class, who would even in normal times feel  “immense pressure” to win admission to top schools by acing the university entrance exam.

“There’s a very narrow conception of what it means to be successful in Korean society,” says Ji-young Lee, who is completing her PhD in multicultural education at the University of Washington in Seattle. 

Lee, who formerly taught high school classes in South Korea, explains many students are under a belief reinforced by their parents and teachers that the path to a successful life begins with the suneung.  

“If you are a good student who scores high, your life is just going to be fine, you’re going to be happy, you’re going to have a pretty or handsome girlfriend or boyfriend and your life’s problems are all going to be solved,” she says. 

Lee adds that students who do not achieve high marks on the test sometimes feel that their lives are “worthless.” 

Related: South Korea votes amid COVID-19 pandemic

Some Korean students and their parents are compensating for the lost classroom time by spending extra hours and money on private tutoring. 

Even though public schools have been close throughout the pandemic, many of these institutes kept their doors open during much of the past two months. 

Eun Soo-yoon, a 17-year old senior who attends a foreign language high school in Seoul, has been taking extracurricular courses for the past few weeks. 

She says she is not overly concerned about the college entry test, but many of her classmates are “freaking out”  right now. Eun says she’s more concerned about the potential risks of returning to school while new COVID-19 cases are still being recorded.  

“I am quite worried since we are the first ones to return in South Korea and we don’t know if it’s totally safe,” she says. 

On Tuesday, the Korea Centers for Disease Control reported 13 more coronavirus infections, bringing the country’s total number of COVID-19 cases to 11,078 to date.  

Eun says even though her school is reminding students to wear masks and frequently wash their hands, she doesn’t trust that all of her classmates will follow the guidelines. 

“Some boys never wash their hands and I hate that,” she says. “Personal hygiene is very important.”

Eun adds when she returns to class, she’ll take with her extra bottles of hand sanitizer. 

How to deal with a cyclone in the middle of a pandemic?

How to deal with a cyclone in the middle of a pandemic?

By
The World staff

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Clouds cover the skies over the river Ganges ahead of Cyclone Amphan, in Kolkata, India, May 19, 2020.

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Rupak De Chowdhuri/Reuters

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India and Bangladesh evacuated around half a million people out of the way of the most powerful storm in a decade ahead of its landfall on Wednesday amid fears of heavy damage to houses and crops and disruption of road, rail and power links.

The authorities’ task to save lives was complicated by ongoing efforts to curb the coronavirus pandemic and enforce social distancing to avoid a surge of infections. Many thousands of migrant workers are on the roads trying to get home from big cities after a nationwide lockdown destroyed their livelihoods.

Approaching from the Bay of Bengal, Cyclone Amphan was expected to hit the coast of eastern India and southern Bangladesh with winds roughly the equivalent of a Category 5 hurricane.

The Indian weather department forecast a storm surge of 10- to 16-foot waves — as high as a two-story house — that could swamp mud dwellings along the coast, uproot communication towers and inundate roads and rail tracks.

There will be extensive damage to standing crops and plantations in the states of West Bengal and Odisha while large boats and ships could get torn from their moorings, the weather service said in a bulletin late on Tuesday.

Samarendra Karmakar is a retired director of Bangladesh’s Meteorological Department. He spoke with the World’s host Marco Werman from Bangladesh’s capital, Dhaka.

Related: Preparing for hurricanes: 3 essential reads

Marco Werman: What can you tell us about this storm?

Samarendra Karmakar: It is already weakened slightly in the afternoon, late afternoon, with sustained wind speed of about 200 kilometers [and it] may weaken a little more during landfall.

So, you’re looking at wind speeds now between 120-150, but expecting some weakening. The people most at risk to the severe flooding live in coastal cities. They live in mud and wooden shacks. Where is the government evacuating these people to? Are there shelters? And are they adequate?

I think the government is making a lot of preparations. They are making these shelters ready. They have increased the number of shelters because the schools are now closed because of the coronavirus. So, that will be useful. And the volunteers of the cyclone preparedness program — they are already in the coastal areas and requesting the people to take shelter in the cyclone shelters. That is what I have seen from the news.

Related: Climate change linked to refugees in Georgia 

So, among the people in very basic shacks are about a million Rohingya refugees who fled the ethnically driven massacres in Myanmar a few years ago. And they’ve been living in this giant refugee camp, Cox’s Bazar in Bangladesh. What do you know about their situation? Do they have enough space to relocate?

I think the Cox’s Bazar region will be a less impacted area because it is likely to make landfall to the west and southwest — that is, in India and Bangladesh border area. So, the coastal area of Cox’s Bazar and Chittagong, I think that it will be less affected. So, the Rohingya people who are in the tents, I think they will not be impacted so much, but there will be some thunderstorms or rainfall or something like that, what is usual during this time.

I’ve read that across Bangladesh, some people are hesitant to evacuate. Why do you think that is?

It happens always. In our country or in other countries also; what I have seen is that people don’t like to go to the shelters sometimes. And there are many reasons for this. And this year, you know, the coronavirus is a new addition; it is a new issue. And they may think that the social distance will not be maintained properly — that may also create a problem among them this year. But the government has requested that the people do use masks and increase the number of shelters for managing some social distance among the people.

Related: A climate migration crisis is escalating in Bangladesh 

I just learned today that about 40% of global storm surges hit Bangladesh. In fact, some of the deadliest cyclones have hit Bangladesh in the past half-century. As you say, now, there’s the coronavirus. How prepared do you think Bangladesh really is for the effects of this storm?

The people are now [aware] than before. So, this is my thinking that people will be going to the shelter and also take precautions in this case.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity. Reuters contributed reporting. 

Canadian activists say they’re being targeted by China

Canadian activists say they’re being targeted by China

By
Rupa Shenoy

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The Chinese national flag is seen in Beijing, April 29, 2020.

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Thomas Peter/Reuters 

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Gloria Fung first saw them nine months ago. She was at a rally she helped organize in front of Toronto’s old City Hall, to show support for pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong.

“Soon after we had assembled, more than 100 counterprotesters blocked our way chanting, ‘One China,’” Fung said, recalling that the counterprotesters waved Chinese flags.

“They shouted insults and threats and photographed individuals as an intimidation tactic.”

Related: Canada closes most of its great outdoors to curb COVID-19

After that, Fung said, pro-China groups showed up in several Canadian cities, and threats increased against Canadian activists. That pattern of intimidation led Fung and a coalition of human rights groups across Canada to release a recent report that documents a coordinated assault by the Chinese government to shut down criticism of its human rights record.

“Beijing has launched an unprecedented attack on Canadian soil.”

Gloria Fung, Canadian activist

“Beijing has launched an unprecedented attack on Canadian soil,” Fung said at a press conference that streamed live on May 12.

Fung said she got threatening phone calls and that her contact information has appeared in pornographic ads.

“The Chinese government ruthlessly tries to crush all dissent and now are on a global mission to silence any criticism of their policies or human rights record at large,” said Chemi Lhamo, of Students for a Free Tibet Canada, who was also targeted on social media.

“I was hit with comments like, ‘If I see you, I will punch you,’” Lhamo said. “Or, ‘Your mom is dead.’”

Alex Neve of Amnesty International Canada said few of those who are harassed bother reporting it to authorities anymore. He said that’s because they always get a similar response: “We hear a variation of ‘There’s not much we can do. It’s not really a criminal offense. There’s no particular law that applies here.’”

Related: ‘It felt like a war zone’: Coronavirus tears through Canada nursing homes

The human rights coalition is calling on the Canadian government to investigate and consider sanctions against Chinese officials. Neve said they would like to see legislation that requires Canadians acting on behalf of a foreign government to register themselves. The report also recommends new regulations to protect activists on Canada’s college campuses.

“Governments like Canada, working with other governments, not on our own, need to be more courageous and determined about standing up to these kinds of human rights violations including within our own borders.” 

Alex Neve, Amnesty International Canada

“Governments like Canada, working with other governments, not on our own, need to be more courageous and determined about standing up to these kinds of human rights violations including within our own borders,” he said.

Canadian officials say they’ll study the report’s recommendations. The Chinese government hasn’t commented.

US officials blast Apple for not unlocking Pensacola gunman’s phones

US officials blast Apple for not unlocking Pensacola gunman’s phones

By
Lydia Emmanouilidou

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The main gate at Naval Air Station Pensacola is seen on Navy Boulevard in Pensacola, Florida, March 16, 2016.

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US officials on Monday announced that data retrieved from the cellphones of a Saudi military trainee who opened fire at a Navy base in Pensacola, Florida, in 2019 reveals the gunman had longtime ties to the terrorist group, al-Qaeda.

In their announcement, FBI and US Justice Department officials blasted Apple, the maker of the gunman’s phones, for refusing to help them unlock the devices and accused the company of slowing down the investigation.

Related: Facebook will pay $52M to US content moderators for trauma on the job. What about its international contractors?

The identified gunman, Ahmed Mohammed al-Shamrani, was fatally shot by authorities after killing three US sailors and injuring eight others at Naval Air Station Pensacola during the December 2019 attack.

As part of the investigation that ensued, investigators obtained court orders to search the dead gunman’s phones, but were not immediately able to gain access to the password-protected devices.

“We received effectively no help from Apple.”

Christopher Wray, FBI, director

“We received effectively no help from Apple,” said FBI Director Christopher Wray, who went on to applaud federal agents for coming up with their own way to break into the phone.

But the monthslong effort “seriously hampered this investigation,” he added.

Related: Twitter and Facebook are collaborating to stop the spread of coronavirus misinformation. Is it enough?

In a statement to The World, Apple denied accusations that it didn’t help investigators.

“Apple responded to the FBI’s first requests for information just hours after the attack on December 6, 2019 and continued to support law enforcement during their investigation,” the company said. “We provided every piece of information available to us, including iCloud backups, account information and transactional data for multiple accounts, and we lent continuous and ongoing technical and investigative support to FBI offices in Jacksonville, Pensacola and New York over the months since.”

“The false claims made about our company are an excuse to weaken encryption and other security measures that protect millions of users and our national security.”

Apple has long resisted calls by US and other officials around the globe to change its encryption software and create a backdoor that law enforcement can use to access phone data during investigations. In a 2016 interview with ABC News, Apple CEO Tim Cook said creating such a tool would be the “software equivalent of cancer.”

“In cases like this, where the user is a terrorist, or in other cases, where the user is a violent criminal, human trafficker, or child predator, Apple’s decision has dangerous consequences for public safety and national security and is, in my judgment, unacceptable.”

US Attorney General William Barr  

“In cases like this, where the user is a terrorist, or in other cases, where the user is a violent criminal, human trafficker, or child predator, Apple’s decision has dangerous consequences for public safety and national security and is, in my judgment, unacceptable,” US Attorney General William Barr said at Monday’s press conference. 

In its statement, Apple said “there is no such thing as a backdoor just for the good guys, and the American people do not have to choose between weakening encryption and effective investigations.”

‘We can’t take our health for granted’ as US reopens, says Dr. Howard Koh

'We can't take our health for granted' as US reopens, says Dr. Howard Koh

By
The World staff

Interviewed by
Elana Gordon

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Life after combat: How relationships in wartime continue to shape society

Life after combat: How relationships in wartime continue to shape society

Interviewed by
Sam Ratner

The abandoned headquarters of Mozambican opposition party Renamo is pictured in the port city of Beira, ahead of local government elections, Nov. 19, 2013. 

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Grant Lee Neuenburg/Reuters 

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This interview was featured in Critical State, a weekly newsletter from The World and Inkstick Media. Subscribe here.

How do relationships between combatants forged in wartime continue to shape political, economic, and social relations even after those combatants have been reintegrated and the conflict ends? 

Related: In Colombia, imprisoned ex-combatants help maintain peace

Nikkie Wiegink, an assistant professor at Utrecht University, studies social reconstruction after war, armed group dynamics, disarmament, demobilization and reintegration of combatants, coal mining and the anthropology of infrastructure.

Wiegink’s new book, “Former Guerrillas in Mozambique,” is a groundbreaking ethnography of how relationships between combatants forged in wartime continue to shape political, economic, and social relations even after those combatants have been “reintegrated.”

Related: In rural Colombia, former FARC rebels now fight for jobs and security

Wiegink spoke with Sam Ratner of Critical State via email as part of their Midnight Oil series to find out more about her work on dispossession and resettlement studies. 

Critical State: What is the hardest question you try to answer in your work?

Nikkie Wiegink: Now that I study dispossession and resettlement issues associated with coal mining, as well as civil war combatants and their lives after conflict, I’ve had occasion to think about what draws those interests together and makes me so curious about both of them. In a way, both are about understanding what underlies processes that are often framed as “bad” or “evil.” What are the inner workings of war, but also what are the inner workings of dispossession caused by large-scale extractive projects? And how do the people involved in such processes make sense of them?

In my experience, people generally think of what they do and who they are as good. Thus while people may be part of processes that engender dispossession or violence, as a mining official or as a combatant or as something completely different, people often consider their daily life and work, or something that they define as something worthwhile, which can mean many things. I’m fundamentally curious to understand who these people are who work in these constellations and how they talk about their work and their lives. When I was researching former Renamo guerrillas in Mozambique, that meant understanding what war participation (among many other things) means in people’s life trajectories.

Disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration programs frame post-war reintegration as a rupture — people were in society, then left it to go to war, and are now returning to their pre-war relationship to society through reintegration — but that isn’t how many combatants experience it. Instead, I found that former fighters’ life trajectories comprised of a mixture of ruptures and continuities of relationships and networks, which included their relatives, the spiritual world, fellow former fighters, political parties and much more.

Related: It’s time for the US to rethink Huntington’s philosophy: Part I

How do you go about answering that question?

Part of it is basic ethnographic research — to study people’s lives and the stories they tell about their lives from within. In hours-long interviews, I’d go through all the stages in peoples’ lives. But it’s also important to be part of peoples’ lives and see how their lived experiences compare with the stories they tell. For example, Renamo former combatants can tell you about how they found their wife in the war and how they connect to their fellow former combatants, but it’s another thing to see how every week they would drink together, how they engage in relationships of trade and patronage dynamics with fellow war veterans. My research thus involves being part of people’s everyday lives, as much as possible, and getting the widest possible picture of peoples’ experiences.

In Maringué, an area of central Mozambique where I did fieldwork and where many ex-combatants from the Mozambican civil war live, people would tend to say, “Everything is good, the war is over, we are all brothers and sisters now.” In their narratives, people would explicitly not emphasize the political divisions that continued to characterize post-war Mozambique. But just by being there and going to church gatherings and masses, at a certain point, I realized that oh yeah, that church is a church primarily associated with Renamo, that church is associated with Frelimo, and that people would go out of their way not to cross political lines.

Similarly, it took a long time for me to understand that when people would describe someone as being from a certain area, they meant it often as a political identifier more than a geographical one — because a reference to some areas meant they were associated with Renamo, while others would be indications of Frelimo. It took time to understand the way people talk about things — especially about politics in the case of my research. 

I was in Maringué for 14 months, and I still probably did not get half of it. There are many layers of meaning behind what people say. That’s the real value of doing participant observation next to the interviews.

This interview has been lightly edited.  

Critical State is your weekly fix of foreign policy without all the stuff you don’t need. It’s top news and accessible analysis for those who want an inside take without all the insider bs. Subscribe here.

Powerful cyclone prompts millions to evacuate; Trump threatens WHO funding, US membership; Tracking the growing list of COVID-19 symptoms

Powerful cyclone prompts millions to evacuate; Trump threatens WHO funding, US membership; Tracking the growing list of COVID-19 symptoms

By
The World staff

A scientist at India Meteorological Department Earth System Science Organization, points to a section of the screen showing the position of the Cyclone Amphan to media people inside his office in Kolkata, India, May 19, 2020.

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Rupak De Chowdhuri/Reuters

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Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

A potentially devastating cyclone is expected to hit South Asia on Wednesday, leading India and Bangladesh to evacuate up to 3 million people from the storm’s path. Cyclone Amphan had been classified as the most powerful type of cyclone and the second such storm to be tracked in the region since 1999. Though it has been weakening slightly, it is still likely to bring dangerous wind, rain and flooding. 

Cyclone Amphan is coming in the midst of a pandemic, in which India and Bangladesh together have more than 125,000 confirmed coronavirus cases. Some evacuees fear catching the virus in emergency shelters with no room to maintain social distance. 

A recent study shows that major tropical cyclones have become more likely over the past 40 years. According to researchers: “A warming planet may be fueling the increase” in stronger, sustained winds.

Trump threatens WHO funding, US membership

US President Donald Trump has redoubled his criticism of the World Health Organization, threatening to permanently withdraw funding and reconsider US membership if the UN agency does not commit to “major substantive improvements” within the next 30 days. The ultimatum comes after the first day of a WHO global summit urging international cooperation. The Trump administration already put a 60-day hold on WHO funds in April. Withdrawing support and membership would weaken the agency in the middle of a worldwide fight to tackle the novel coronavirus pandemic. It would also leave the US with little influence over the body and less access to WHO resources. 

And: China accuses US of coronavirus smear campaign

Also: Trump says he’s taking hydroxychloroquine, prompting warning from health experts

Colombian airlines face controversy over pandemic loans

Governments worldwide — from Singapore to the Netherlands and the US — have devoted more than $85 billion to prop up airlines during the coronavirus pandemic. But airlines’ requests for aid are controversial in less rich Latin American economies, where millions live in poverty and public health systems are ill-equipped to respond to a large-scale health crisis. Many leaders in Latin America likely see air travel as a luxury and may be reluctant to extend help to airlines during the crisis.

And: Britain is at risk of ‘returning to 80s levels of unemployment’

Tracking the growing list of COVID-19 symptoms

When the novel coronavirus first emerged in China, the world was warned to watch out for two main symptoms: fever or a persistent cough. A lot has changed since then. Researchers are learning that symptoms of the coronavirus can vary depending on myriad factors, such as age and health status. The COVID Symptom Study is pulling together this growing list of the coronavirus symptoms. Since its app launched in March, it has crowdsourced symptoms from more than 3.5 million people in the UK, US and Sweden.

From The World: World faces risk of ‘vaccine nationalism’ in COVID-19 fight, says CEPI chair

And: Trump’s use of malaria drug likely to be welcomed in India

Mosques in Kenya offer virtual prayers for Ramadan

On a normal Friday during Ramadan, Ahmed Ali Mohamed would head to the mosque with his family and friends to break the fast. But with the pandemic, this year’s Ramadan experience is anything but normal for Muslims in Nairobi, Kenya. Eastleigh, a predominantly Muslim neighborhood in Nairobi where Mohamed’s mother and grandmother live, is currently under lockdown, and most mosques have closed. Instead, some mosques are offering virtual prayers via YouTube.

And: Eid al-Fitr 2020: Everything you need to know

Art, poetry and … zombies? Cultural legacies of the 1918 pandemic

Norwegian artist Edvard Munch’s “Self-Portrait with the Spanish Flu,” circa 1919. 

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Public domain/Wikimedia Commons

There seem to be few great works of art that keep the 1918 flu pandemic alive in cultural memory. But Elizabeth Outka, author of “Viral Modernism: The Influenza Pandemic and Interwar Literature,” says the 1918 pandemic’s influence is an undercurrent that runs through many works of the period.

For example, the pandemic and World War I led to a renewed interest in spiritualism, a belief that humans could communicate with the dead through seances, mediums and objects like Ouija boards. Another surprising cultural byproduct of the pandemic? Zombies.

Also: Polish hit song on grieving ‘censored’, sparking protests

Morning meme

After searching for 32 years, a Chinese couple has finally been reunited with their son, who was abducted from a Xi’an hotel when he was just two years old. 

“I won’t let him leave me anymore,” cried his mom. https://t.co/OcXTs6jx4K

— Shanghaiist.com (@shanghaiist) May 19, 2020In case you missed itListen: World leaders convene to address coronavirus crisis response

Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, director general of World Health Organization speaks at the virtual 73rd World Health Assembly following the coronavirus outbreak in Geneva, Switzerland, May 18, 2020.

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Christopher Black/WHO/handout via Reuters

It’s an unprecedented time and situation: “A microscopic virus has brought us to our knees,” said United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres at the start of the 73rd annual World Health Assembly on Monday. Leaders from around the world convened, for the first time virtually, for two days of meetings to address the world’s response to the global pandemic. And, Brazil, one of the world’s coronavirus epicenters, is now navigating the coronavirus crisis without a health minister after Nelson Taich resigned on Friday. Also, a principal in New Zealand has posted a catchy YouTube video as health advice for her students returning after lockdown encouraging them to stay out of each other’s “moist breath zone.”

Don’t forget to subscribe to The World’s Latest Edition podcast using your favorite podcast player: RadioPublicApple PodcastsStitcherSoundcloudRSS.

A 26-year manhunt for Rwandan genocide fugitive ends

A 26-year manhunt for Rwandan genocide fugitive ends

By
Halima Gikandi

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Dimitrie Sissi Mukanyiligira, a Rwandan genocide survivor looks at a laptop computer with the webpage showing the pictures of the Rwandan genocide fugitive Félicien Kabuga, as she takes part in a Reuters interview in Kigali, Rwanda, May 18, 2020. 

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The 26-year hunt for Félicien Kabuga —  spanning two continents and lasting more than two decades — has finally come to an end. On Saturday morning, French police arrested the now 84-year-old Rwandan genocide fugitive from his apartment in a suburb of Paris.

“Félicien Kabuga has always been one of the most wanted fugitives. … He has always been considered as being one of the masterminds in relation to the genocide.”

 Serge Brammertz,  chief prosecutor, United Nations International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals

“Félicien Kabuga has always been one of the most wanted fugitives,” Serge Brammertz, chief prosecutor of the United Nations International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals (IRMCT), told The World in an interview Monday. “He has always been considered as being one of the masterminds in relation to the genocide.” 

Related: Somali torture victim will face his abuser after 31 years — in US court

In 1997, Kabuga was indicted by the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) on seven counts of genocide and related crimes. His alleged role includes financing the 1994 genocide, arming militia groups, and heading a hate-filled radio station, Radio Télévision Mille Collines.

Genocide survivors such as Naphtal Ahishakiye, 46, still remember the words of hate on the radio. “Tutsi is the biggest enemy of Rwanda. Of Hutu. So the radio considered Tutsi as the animals, cockroaches,” he recalled hearing.

Ahishakiye is the executive secretary of Ibuka, a group for genocide survivors. Growing up as a Tutsi, he remembers the day-to-day discrimination by majority Hutu elites beginning long before 1994. 

Related: Syrian officials on trial for war crimes in Germany

After spending 100 days hiding at neighbors’ homes and in the forest, only he and two sisters survived — the rest of his family died, including his parents, brothers and cousins, he said. At least 800,000 people are estimated to have been killed, the majority of them Tutsis.

While the ICTR officially concluded in 2015, ongoing cases were turned over to the IRMCT — now led by Brammertz — and continued to pursue Kabuga. 

“We can never give up looking for those fugitives,” said Brammertz, speaking about the international community. 

Previous attempts to capture Kabuga have failed, most notably a plot by the FBI and Kenyan authorities in 2003, which resulted in the death of an informant in Nairobi. The US has had a $5 million bounty on the fugitive. 

Two years ago, Brammertz established a new task force to track down Kabuga in partnership with European authorities. 

“We start[ed] where we were sure he was seen for the last time, which was in 2007 when he underwent surgery in Germany,” Brammertz said. He and his team began tracing Kabuga’s steps through Belgium and Luxembourg, identifying people who were likely to have helped him hide.

“Based on the analysis, phone profiles, financial information, we concluded two months ago that it was very likely that it was in a specific area in Paris,” Brammertz said.

“We are happy for France to facilitate this process to arrest Kabuga.  … In previous years, France didn’t play a role in this kind of justice.”

Naphtal Ahishakiye, executive secretary, Ibuka group for genocide survivors, Rwanda

“We are happy for France to facilitate this process to arrest Kabuga,” Ahishakiye said. “In previous years, France didn’t play a role in this kind of justice.”

Related: Thousands of ISIS fighters sit in prison. Kurdish leaders call for a special tribunal.

Indeed, the relationship between Rwanda and France has been strained by accusations that France was complicit in the genocide, an accusation it has historically denied. Last year, French President Emmanuel Macron directed a panel of experts to investigate France’s role in the genocide.

According to Brammertz, Kabuga will be transferred to the Mechanism Tribunal in Arusha, Tanzania, or The Hague, depending on travel restrictions that might exist due to the coronavirus pandemic.

When it comes to an actual trial, “it’s more likely that it takes closer to a year,” Brammertz said.

Discussion: Lessons from the coronavirus pandemic to avert a future crisis

Discussion: Lessons from the coronavirus pandemic to avert a future crisis

Updated:

May 19, 2020 · 12:45 PM EDT

By
The World staff

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The United States and Britain are among the countries worst hit by the coronavirus and have faced criticism for their handling of the pandemic. But only last year, they ranked as the countries most prepared for a major health crisis.

The ranking suggests that when it comes to preparedness, “we’re not measuring what we need to measure,” said Kristie Ebi, a University of Washington public health specialist — adding that also applies to emerging threats from climate change.

The coronavirus is now helping “every country measure and evaluate the (preparedness) of their health system”, said Niranjan Saggurti, director of the Indian office of the Population Council, a health and development research nonprofit.

Related discussion: What role will antibodies have in a future immunity to the coronavirus?

In Africa, where the rich regularly jet abroad for care as national health systems struggle, the virus is sparking a rethink about how sturdy systems need to be, said Chris Gordon, a University of Ghana environmental scientist.

“I think a lot of world leaders in developing countries have taken the coronavirus much more seriously than other events because of the lockdown,” he said. “Privileged classes can no longer fly to the Western world or places like Singapore to get health care. They’re stuck with the health systems they’ve created, and I think this is what has made them sit up.”

That has led in some countries to plans for new hospitals and additional money going to research institutions to help investigate vaccines, Gordon said.

The coronavirus pandemic has underscored the critical role of public health in protecting people around the world. But the crisis has also exposed the need for more investment to help prevent a pandemic of this magnitude from happening again.

As part of our weekly series taking your questions to the experts, The World’s Elana Gordon moderated a discussion with Dr. Howard Koh, Harvey V. Fineberg professor of the practice of public health leadership at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the Harvard Kennedy School, as well as the 14th Assistant Secretary for Health for the US Department of Health and Human Services.

Koh addressed our response to the current pandemic and how it is intricately tied to strengthening and building a better public health system that builds on hard-won lessons.

Reuters contributed to this report.

The changing face of Venice 

The changing face of Venice 

Although Italy has begun reopening, it’s unclear what the future holds for Venice, a city historically dependent on millions of tourists each year.  

By
Francesca Berardi

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The San Marco basin in Venice, Italy, appears placid as a result of the slowdown in activity with the country’s lockdown in response to the coronavirus.

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Francesca Berardi/The World 

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Up until three months ago, no one would have believed that on a sunny Saturday in May, the streets of Venice would be nearly empty. Even more so, no one would have imagined seeing the water of the canals — usually agitated by the passage of boat taxis and huge ships — finally so calm.

As the coronavirus pandemic has halted tourism, an industry that brings to the city an estimate of more than 30 million people every year, Venice has changed her face.

This month, the country began gradually reopening after imposing nationwide restrictions in early March. Almost 32,000 Italians have died of COVID-19 since the outbreak came to light on Feb. 21, the third-highest death toll in the world after the United States and Britain.

Related: Strolling through Turin amid lockdown

The area around the Rialto Bridge, on the Grand Canal in Venice, Italy, has been quiet since the country’s lockdown went into effect. 

Credit:

Francesca Berardi/The World 

Italy, on the whole, is trying to figure out its future, but in cities like Venice — where the economy is so heavily based on tourism — it’s even harder. In the meantime, the city, built on more than 100 islands connected with 400 bridges, looks drastically different. Especially its water.

Related: Living under lockdown in the Eternal City

On the Grand Canal, where only a few months ago, a cruise ship collided with a boat, a few locals enjoyed a trip on a rowboat. At the historic Rialto Market, usually crammed with visitors from all over the world, dozens of Venetians walked among the stalls of fresh fish and vegetables, wearing masks and holding their shopping bags with latex gloves.

“Usually, there are more people who take pictures of fish than who buy them.”

Luigi Divari, former sea captain

“Usually, there are more people who take pictures of fish than who buy them,” said Luigi Divari, 72, a former sea captain, and an expert on local marine life. “The market is in a major crisis and for years has been at risk of closing.”

Luigi Divari, 72, is a former sea captain, and an expert on local marine life. 

Credit:

Francesca Berardi/The World 

Divari is currently working as an artist, creating detailed watercolors of fish and boats typical of the lagoon. To recognize the geographical origin of fish on the stands, he only needs a glance.

“These here are St. Peter[’s] [tilapia] fillets from the North Atlantic; this is Norwegian salmon; here, we have tuna from the Seychelles; those prawns are Argentinian; mullets are French …”

“And these are ours,” he said, pointing at a polystyrene box filled with clams.

Related: Robot nurse helps Italian doctors care for COVID-19 patients

Luigi Divari’s image “Shellfish,” 2015, is pictured. 

 

Credit:

Courtesy of Mare di Carta/Luigi Divari

Since the lockdown began more than two months ago, locals have spotted fish in the lagoon they’re not used to seeing.

Divari had a simple answer for why that is: “When boats are racing around the canal, the water is murky and people don’t even look down at it. Now, the water is clear, very calm and people have started to notice that there was a jellyfish, a seahorse. But they were always there, you just couldn’t see them.”

For Venetians, the lockdown has been an opportunity to see not only new life in the canals, but new perspectives across the city. The beauty and structure of this architectural miracle on water is now before everyone’s eyes, as is the collective dilemma of one issue: the massive presence of tourists in the life of the city.

“Until December, tourism was the No. 1 problem. Now, it is the No. 1 problem because it is missing. Before, people complained because tourists were there. Now, they complain because they’re gone.” 

Luigi Divari, former sea captain

“Until December, tourism was the No. 1 problem. Now, it is the No. 1 problem because it is missing. Before, people complained because tourists were there. Now, they complain because they’re gone,” Divari said.

Related: Music to soothe the soul: Ludovico Einaudi’s ‘Elegy for the Arctic’

But during the lockdown, residents were able to become tourists themselves, strolling through streets normally crammed with visitors and snapping selfies in front of the most iconic sites — like Ponte di Rialto and Piazza San Marco. It was a reminder that Venice could be an ideal place to live.

In a little square behind the market, Maria Fiano and Francesco Penzo chatted as they sat on the steps of Venice’s oldest church, San Giacomo di Rialto. They are the co-founders of Ocio, an organization defined as an “observatory,” which collects data on and advocates for housing rights in Venice.

Maria Fiano and Francesco Penzo are the co-founders of Ocio, an organization that collects data on and advocates for housing rights in Venice, Italy. They are concerned about the emphasis on bringing massive tourism back to the city. 
 

Credit:

Francesca Berardi/The World 

“I have always considered this ancient part of the city to be the city of the future. It is very intelligent from an urbanistic point of view and built on a human scale. Everything is reachable in a 10- or 15-minute walk. The city is designed for you to have encounters, chats and a sense of community.”

Maria Fiano, co-founder, Ocio

“I have always considered this ancient part of the city to be the city of the future. It is very intelligent from an urbanistic point of view and built on a human scale,” Fiano said. “Everything is reachable in a 10- or 15-minute walk. The city is designed for you to have encounters, chats and a sense of community.”

But the city is continuing to lose residents, with only 80,000 people living in the historic part and on the main islands.

“There is no housing for students, for professionals, for university professors who want to come here,” Penzo said, explaining that the housing situation in Venice — like in many other European cities — has worsened over the past few years with the increasing popularity of online tourism platforms, such as Airbnb.

Penzo says the outbreak of the coronavirus seemed to create an opportunity to reflect on a more sustainable future for the city, but it didn’t last long.

“There was a moment of awareness in which we said it’s time to rethink … but since [the lockdown ended], the only concern is to reopen everything to bring back the tourists,” he said.

As Venice reopens, there is no plan to attract new residents or diversify the economy. The mayor — and the people who voted for him — just want tourism to come back. 

Venetians are still suffering from the flooding that brought the city to its knees last November, the worst in 50 years. Those who are hoping for a change, even though they have plenty of ideas on how to revitalize the city, are pessimistic.

The Piazza San Marco in Venice, Italy, looks deserted in the midst of lockdown orders. 

Credit:

Francesca Berardi/The World 

Nino Zane has mixed feelings about all this. His family has been selling fresh fish at the Rialto Market for generations. His main concern right now is to save his business.

“Before the lockdown, I worked with restaurants and it was so much easier. Now, everything is difficult, a constant worry.”

Nino Zane, fish seller

“Before the lockdown, I worked with restaurants and it was so much easier,” Zane said. “Now, everything is difficult, a constant worry.”

For some Venetians, tourism seems like the only possible future. The pandemic had the surprising power to bring it to a halt, but most people feel, and some of them hope, that nothing will stop it once the global crisis has passed.

That may take months, if not years. Already, some of the big events that draw the rest of the world to Venice are canceling or postponing in the longer run — like the Architecture Biennale, pushed to 2021.

To make the current situation more complicated and worrying, there are also concerns about an explosion in a chemical factory in the city’s industrial area, which some fear could have a lasting impact on the lagoon’s water.

“I hope everything goes back to the way it was, I hope so with all my heart,” Zane said.

Reuters contributed to this report. 

Art, poetry and … zombies? The surprising cultural contributions of the 1918 influenza pandemic

Art, poetry and … zombies? The surprising cultural contributions of the 1918 influenza pandemic

The influence of the 1918 flu pandemic is an undercurrent that runs through many works of the period.

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Amanda McGowan

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Norwegian artist Edvard Munch’s “Self-Portrait with the Spanish Flu,” circa 1919. 

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Public domain/Wikimedia Commons

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The 1918 influenza pandemic was a historic event with massive influence. Millions of people died. Roughly one-third of the entire global population was infected.

But until the novel coronavirus pandemic struck, odds are you probably haven’t thought much about the impact of 1918’s flu outbreak.

That might be because there seem to be few great works of art that keep the 1918 pandemic alive in cultural memory —  the way a novel like “All Quiet On The Western Front,” or the haunting paintings of Otto Dix did for World War I. 

But scholar Elizabeth Outka, author of “Viral Modernism: The Influenza Pandemic and Interwar Literature,” argues the 1918 flu pandemic’s influence is an undercurrent that runs through many works of the period.

She points to examples like Virginia Woolf’s novel “Mrs. Dalloway,” which follows upper-class London resident Clarissa Dalloway as she makes her way around the city. Though often read as a novel about the aftermath of the war, the pandemic leaves its mark, too. The titular character suffers from heart damage resulting from influenza — as did Woolf, in real life. 

Related: Quarantine projects curate pandemic-inspired art

Another surprising cultural byproduct of the pandemic? Zombies.

Outka says the enormous death toll of the war and the pandemic — which required mass graves, delayed funerals, or insecure burials — deprived families of the traditional mourning process. There was also a fear of unwittingly infecting loved ones with a hidden, contagious disease. From these anxieties sprung proto-zombie figures in the works of horror author H.P. Lovecraft, as well as in the 1919 silent film “J’accuse,” by French director Abel Gance. 

“It was a way, I think … of visualizing a monster that was invisible, in the case of the flu,” Outka said.

Mary Todd Lincoln with Abraham Lincoln’s “spirit,” around 1869.

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Public domain/Allen County Public Library, Fort Wayne, Indiana

The pandemic and World War I also led to a renewed interest in spiritualism, a belief that humans could communicate with the dead through seances, mediums and objects like Ouija boards. 

Related: In a new MoMA audio guide, security guards are the art experts

One prominent proponent of spiritualism was Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the author of the Sherlock Holmes series, whose son and younger brother died of influenza.

Doyle gave sold-out talks discussing his spiritualist ideas and showing so-called “spirit photographs,” which claimed to show living people with the “ghosts” of dead family members standing behind them.

“To our eyes, these seem like obvious frauds. But at the time, it offered a tangible way to bring back somebody who had died in these terrible ways, and it was a way of handling that kind of grief and giving somebody a visual that they could hang onto,” Outka said. 

Related: During social distancing, artists collaborate on ‘Long Distance Art’

Outka says she expects the current coronavirus pandemic to influence art, as well — though it may take some time. 

“There’s always a lag time with art. Sometimes it takes people a year, or a decade, or two decades, to turn an experience into art,” she said.

“I think we’re going to see a lot of art coming out in the immediate aftermath of COVID, but keep your eyes open about the way art is going to emerge down the line — that’s how people process things,” she added.

Study tracks growing list of COVID-19 symptoms in real time

Study tracks growing list of COVID-19 symptoms in real time

The COVID Symptom Study is pulling together this growing list of the coronavirus symptoms. Since its app launched in March, it has crowdsourced symptoms from more than 3.5 million people in the UK, US and Sweden.

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Elana Gordon

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People walk on the banks of the river Seine after France began a gradual end to a nationwide lockdown due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Paris, May 17, 2020.

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Gonzalo Fuentes/Reuters 

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When the novel coronavirus first emerged in China, the world was warned to watch out for two main symptoms: fever or a persistent cough.

A lot has changed since then.

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now lists seven symptoms, and the World Health Organization includes even more, with a breakdown of which ones appears to be more or less common. On Monday, the United Kingdom also added loss of smell and taste to the growing list of symptoms.

Related: World faces risk of ‘vaccine nationalism’ in COVID-19 fight, says CEPI chair

Researchers are learning that symptoms of the coronavirus can vary depending on myriad factors, such as age and health status. And they’re seeing other conditions they hadn’t connected to the disease earlier on, including in children.

Although cases of the coronavirus in children are few and far between, doctors have recently observed a syndrome they say is probably linked to COVID-19. Some children have experienced a rare condition involving an overreaction of the immune system and requiring intensive care.

“I call on all clinicians worldwide to work with your national authorities and WHO to be on the alert and better understand this syndrome in children.”

Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO director-general

“I call on all clinicians worldwide to work with your national authorities and WHO to be on the alert and better understand this syndrome in children,” said WHO director-general Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus.

The COVID Symptom Study is pulling together this growing list of the coronavirus symptoms in real-time. Since its app launched in March, it has crowdsourced symptoms from more than 3.5 million people in the UK, US and Sweden.

Related: Under lockdown, mosques in Kenya offer virtual prayers for Ramadan

“There are a few other ones we’ve added recently like acute muscle pains, hives of the face and skin rashes,” said Dr. Timothy Spector, a professor of genetic epidemiology and a doctor at King’s College in London and co-director of the study. “We’ve also got chest pain, abdominal pain, shortness of breath, hoarse voice, confusion, diarrhea. Important ones are fatigue, anorexia and loss of smell and taste.”

That last one — loss of smell and taste — caught the group’s attention. Spector and others with the project had a study in the journal Nature last week showing that the loss of smell and taste was higher in those with a positive test result — around 65% reported it — compared to those with a negative test result — about 21.7%.

But it may be confusing for people to know whether a loss of smell or taste has to do with something like spring allergies as opposed to COVID-19. One indicator is that a person has never experienced such symptoms before.

The reason symptoms vary so wildly may depend on how people’s immune systems respond to the virus, but scientists are still learning. Through the study, researchers are able to zoom out and track trends at a population level.

Related: Gorilla conservation’s latest threat: COVID-19 from tourists

Spector is also interested in how genetics comes into play as well as people’s guts, or microbiomes.

“In my career, I’ve never seen any disease that has such a variable effect in people and can affect nearly every part of the body as well.”

Dr. Timothy Spector, King’s College in London

“In my career, I’ve never seen any disease that has such a variable effect in people and can affect nearly every part of the body as well.”

Clusters of symptoms may be an indicator of the disease and its spread, according to Dr. Andrew Chan, an epidemiologist at Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health and lead researcher of the project. One example might be groups of people reporting a combination of abdominal pain, acute loss of smell and a stuffy nose.

The hope is that such knowledge and data could better identify outbreaks.

“Our understanding of the symptoms has changed as a result of the data we’re collecting,” he said. “That [data] has been returned to public health authorities as a way to better track where we’re actually seeing incidence.”

Related: Madagascar defends coronavirus herbal remedy 

The need to get a better, real-time clinical picture of COVID-19 is critical, said Eleanor Murray, an assistant professor of epidemiology at Boston University who wasn’t involved in the study.

Tracking self-reported symptoms in this way can help researchers identify symptoms that might not be on their radar, she said. But Murray cautioned that the study has limits: It only captures those who use the app.

“Who downloads that app, who uses that app, who has access to a smartphone?” she said, adding that the app may miss young children and the elderly.

The fact that more people may be primed to report symptoms that they’re more aware of now might also throw off the data somewhat, she said.

World faces risk of ‘vaccine nationalism’ in COVID-19 fight, says CEPI chair

World faces risk of 'vaccine nationalism' in COVID-19 fight, says CEPI chair

With so many competing interests facing off, it's far from clear that once an effective vaccine is produced, all of the world's citizens will have equitable access to it.

By
The World staff

Producer
Joyce Hackel

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Small bottles labeled with a “Vaccine COVID-19” sticker and a medical syringe are seen in this illustration taken taken April 10, 2020. There are currently no approved treatments or vaccines for COVID-19. 

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Dado Ruvic/Illustration/Reuters

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Colombian airlines face controversy over loans to survive pandemic crisis

Colombian airlines face controversy over loans to survive pandemic crisis

Governments worldwide — from Singapore to the Netherlands and the US — have devoted more than $85 billion to prop up airlines during the coronavirus pandemic. But airlines' requests for aid are controversial in less rich Latin American economies, where millions live in poverty and public health systems are ill-equipped to respond to a large-scale health crisis.

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Jorge Valencia

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An aerial view shows Colombian airline Avianca’s planes parked at El Dorado International Airport amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Bogotá, Colombia, April 7, 2020.

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Luisa Gonzalez/Reuters

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The Colombian government is considering extending loans to the country’s airlines, as the coronavirus pandemic has grounded their fleets and wiped out most of their revenue through at least June.

Altogether, the country’s airlines would need some $1.2 billion in financial aid to stay in business without flying through the middle of the year, according to the International Air Transport Association, an industry trade group. Most of the cash would likely go to Avianca, which accounts for about half of Colombia’s flights and passengers. Avianca filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in the United States last week.

Governments worldwide — from Singapore to the Netherlands and the US — have devoted more than $85 billion to prop up airlines during the coronavirus pandemic, according to a Bloomberg News analysis. But the request for financial aid is controversial in less rich Latin American economies, where millions live in poverty and public health systems are ill-equipped to respond to a large-scale health crisis.

Related: ‘Reckoning day’ could be ahead for airline industry amid coronavirus challenges

Medellín-based Vivia Air, Colombia’s largest low-cost carrier, has not laid off any of its roughly 730 workers but has instituted across-the-board salary cuts, the company’s chief executive, Felix Antelo, told The World. Antelo’s salary was reduced by 70%. The company is asking the government for a $50 million bridge loan to restart operations once air traffic returns, he said.

“Not for a bailout, not for relief,” Antelo said. “It’s a loan that we will repay, obviously, and those are figures that are reasonable for a country like Colombia.”

Carolina Cortizo, managing director of Bogotá-based airline, Wingo, which employs about 230 people, said the company has reduced its costs by 20% — “which would have seemed awesome pre-COVID[-19]” — but is looking to make further cuts. The company is seeking a loan from the government of less than $12.5 million, she said.

“There’s nothing I want more than to get our planes back in the sky,” Cortizo said. “Our team has been putting a huge effort into the back-to-normal of our airline.”

Related: Governments offer aid as airlines forced to deepen cuts to flights, staffing

But many leaders in Latin America likely see air travel as a luxury and may be reluctant to extend help to airlines during the crisis, said Thijs Boonekamp, an economist with SEO Amsterdam Economics, a think tank. 

In Colombia, about 1 in 4 people live below the poverty line. And in Mexico, President Andrés Manuel López Obrador halted the construction of a new airport for Mexico City because he said it would represent no benefit to the working poor. 

Latin American countries have less “fiscal space” than richer economies to help airlines, said Tomás Serebrisky, an economist with the Inter-American Development Bank.

“They are allocating those resources to more immediate and urgent needs like the need to revamp the health system, or provide income support to the most vulnerable poor of the population,” Serebrisky said.

Under lockdown, mosques in Kenya offer virtual prayers for Ramadan

Under lockdown, mosques in Kenya offer virtual prayers for Ramadan

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Halima Gikandi

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Women walk down the streets of Eastleigh neighborhood of Nairobi, Kenya, Jan. 19, 2019. The neighborhood is currently under quarantine due to a spike in coronavirus cases. 

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Halima Gikandi/The World

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On a normal Friday during Ramadan, Ahmed Ali Mohamed would head to the mosque with his family and friends to break the fast.

“Then [we’d] head home and have a feast with friends, and family, and relatives, sometimes at my grandmother’s or mother’s house,” he said from his home in Nairobi, Kenya. “But this Ramadan has been very different.”

Related: How coronavirus is changing the way Muslims celebrate Ramadan

Eastleigh, a predominantly Muslim neighborhood where Mohamed’s mother and grandmother live, is currently under lockdown, and most mosques have closed. Instead, some mosques are offering virtual prayers via YouTube. 

“I can’t visit at all. No one is allowed,” said Mohamed, who lives in another area of Nairobi. He notes how police and soldiers have put up roadblocks in Eastleigh to prevent people from moving in and out of the neighborhood. 

On May 7, the Kenyan government announced the 15-day lockdown in Eastleigh after the neighborhood saw a spike in COVID-19 cases. Some accused officials of discriminating against Muslims, because they had also locked down Old Town, a predominantly Muslim area in the coastal city of Mombasa.

“There is no effort to target anyone,” Kenya’s Interior Minister Fred Matiangi told Muslim leaders earlier this week. “We are suffering equally. This disease does not choose where you come from.”

Mohamed didn’t feel the lockdown was singling out Muslims. In fact, he recalled how Islamic scripture has specific guidelines on what people should do during a pandemic or a plague.

“Any place that is under quarantine, you shouldn’t go in. And if you are inside you shouldn’t come out,” he said. “That’s hadith [saying] from the prophet, peace be upon him.”

Still, like many in Nairobi, he worries about how his family will deal with the effects of the lockdown. “Most of the people who used to go into Eastleigh come from outside. The small traders. The ones who bring fresh groceries, they don’t come into Eastleigh anymore.”

Residents and workers of Eastleigh initially protested the lockdown, leading officials to allow essential workers to come in and out of the neighborhood.

But Mohamed, who trades wholesale goods like sugar and flour, says the increasingly narrow lockdowns are cutting off food supply not only in Eastleigh but in the whole country.

Related: Coronavirus — and locusts — threaten Kenya’s food security 

Weeks before the Eastleigh quarantine, the government had announced a citywide lockdown, meaning Mohamed cannot leave Nairobi for work.

Even dates — a favorite Ramadan treats — are scarce or overpriced.

“We used to have dates, lots of dates from mostly the Middle Eastern countries, or North Africa,” said Mohamed. “We don’t get them because there are no goods coming into the country,” he continued.

Without iftar feasts to look forward to, Mohamed is spending Ramadan at home with his wife Fatimah, and their two small children.

Instead of going to the mosque, they pray at home. “The majority of the mosques do have YouTube pages, so you can follow the sermons on YouTube,” said Mohamed. 

“Spiritually, you have to go online if you want to interact or see or ask any questions with the imams.”

Mohamed points to Jamia mosque, which closed its doors for the first time in 95 years due to the pandemic. The mosque’s TV channel, Horizon TV, regularly releases virtual prayers, programming for children, and interviews with scientists and experts.

As religious leaders in other parts of the region seek to undermine the threat of the coronavirus, Jamia is trying to drive a different message to its congregants who are spending Ramadan at home. 

“You fall sick today. Look for a doctor, look for medicine,” said Sheikh Ibrahim Lethome in a recent message on Jamia mosque’s YouTube channel.

 

¿Podrá Biden lograr que los latinos voten? Los defensores de la migración no están seguros.

¿Podrá Biden lograr que los latinos voten? Los defensores de la migración no están seguros.

Encuestas recientes sugieren que los votantes latinos no están seguros de que Biden sea la persona adecuada para ser presidente.

By
Daisy Contreras

Reacciones del ex vicepresidente Joe Biden mientras habla el senador Bernie Sanders, en el noveno debate de candidatos demócratas a la presidencia de EE. UU., en febrero de 2020.

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Créditos: Mike Blake / Reuters

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Este artículo, publicado originalmente en Inglés, es parte de nuestra serie “Every 30 Seconds”, producida con el apoyo de la Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

Un día primaveral del hemisferio norte, Vanessa Marcano-Kelly, en medio de cantos, se paró frente a una multitud durante una manifestación y presentó al senador de Vermont, Bernie Sanders, en Des Moines, Iowa. 

Había pasado meses haciendo campaña para el entonces candidato presidencial demócrata en su tiempo libre, fuera de su horario de trabajo, en el que dirige una empresa de servicios de traducción e interpretación de inglés-español. Es la primera ocasión en que Marcano-Kelly, de 35 años, se involucra en una campaña presidencial y en noviembre podrá votar por primera vez, después de haberse convertido en ciudadana estadounidense, el año pasado.

Marcano-Kelly, residente de Iowa, calificó esa concentración, en la que conoció a Sanders, como una “oportunidad increíble” y dijo que su estado de origen era un lugar emocionante para un ciudadano que vota por primera vez, ya que “tienes la oportunidad de conocer a todos, y todos están abiertamente detrás de tu voto”.

Sanders fue un candidato enormemente popular entre los jóvenes y los latinos, dos grupos que se proyectan como bloques importantes en las votaciones de fin de año. Aun así, perdió las primarias de Iowa en marzo, a pesar de contar con el apoyo entusiasta de, precisamente, jóvenes latinos como Marcano-Kelly. Después de perder las primarias en varios estados, Sanders se retiró de la carrera el 8 de abril.

El anuncio de Sanders ha dejado a muchos de sus seguidores latinos a la deriva. Las encuestas recientes de Latino Decisions y otros grupos sugieren que los votantes latinos no están seguros de que Biden sea la persona adecuada para el trabajo o, al menos, creen todavía no lo es.

“Desde entonces, me he sentido muy triste y cuestiono todo”, dijo Marcano-Kelly sobre la decisión de Sanders de abandonar la carrera.

En tanto, Sanders respaldó a Biden durante una transmisión en vivo a principios de abril. “Hoy les pido a todos los estadounidenses, a todos los demócratas, a todos los independientes, a muchos republicanos, que se unan en esta campaña para apoyar su candidatura, que cuenta con mi respaldo”, dijo en la ocasión.

Marcano-Kelly, por su parte, cuenta que a pesar de ello está indecisa y ha estado pidiendo consejos a sus amigos inmigrantes indocumentados.

“Me dicen que definitivamente vote por Biden, no hay duda al respecto”, contó Vanessa. “Pero muchos de ellos dicen: ‘¿Sabes qué? No va a cambiar nada’”.

Vanessa Marcano-Kelly, votante por primera vez

“Me dicen que definitivamente vote por Biden, no hay duda al respecto”, contó Vanessa. “Pero muchos de ellos dicen: ‘¿Sabes qué? No va a cambiar nada’”.

Muchos están esperando que se acerquen las elecciones para tomar una decisión, señaló Stephen Nuño, director de comunicaciones y analista senior de Latino Decisions. La empresa encuestadora acaba de publicar una encuesta nacional en que analiza el impacto de la COVID-19 sobre las comunidades latinas.

La encuesta abordó varios estados con altas poblaciones latinas, incluidos Nevada, California, Nueva York, Nueva Jersey, Florida y Texas. En febrero, el 73% de los latinos con derecho a voto declaró que estaba casi seguro de que votará en las elecciones presidenciales. Sin embargo, en los últimos dos meses esa cifra se ha reducido al 60%. Nuño agrega que “esto es lo que dice la encuesta: si no vas a terreno activamente, no esperes que los latinos se presenten a las urnas en noviembre”.

Asimismo, señala que Biden tendrá que esforzarse más para conquistar ese voto. Sin embargo, el candidato ya enfrenta críticas por ser demasiado conservador en sus políticas, especialmente en materia de inmigración. Los defensores de la migración dicen que su asociación con la administración Obama y sus casi 800.000 deportados podrían desencantar a los votantes latinos.

Aun así, Biden se comprometió a anular las prohibiciones de inmigración del presidente Donald Trump y corregir el proceso de pedido de asilo en el país, entre otras cosas, cuando dio a conocer su plan de inmigración, en diciembre de 2019. No obstante, para Cristina Jiménez, cofundadora de United We Dream, Biden tardó demasiado en tomar una actitud más audaz con respecto a la inmigración. Esta organización ayudó a impulsar la protección de los jóvenes inmigrantes indocumentados por medio de la Acción Diferida para los Llegados en la Infancia (DACA, por sus siglas en inglés), bajo la administración de Obama.

En la misma línea, Jiménez añadió que incluso con la implementación de DACA, los defensores de la migración dicen que nunca vieron un cambio en el enfoque con respecto a las detenciones y deportaciones.

“El vicepresidente Biden ni siquiera reconoció al comienzo de las primarias el impacto de estas deportaciones ni el daño que experimentaron las comunidades bajo la administración de Obama”, añadió.

Para la cofundadora de United We Dream, el candidato demócrata debe lograr que las familias inmigrantes se sientan escuchadas, pues ahora “la gran pregunta de la comunidad latina es ‘¿por qué debemos confiar en ti?’”.

En este sentido, Nuño señaló que el tema no es solo la inmigración. Los jóvenes votantes latinos están preocupados por el acceso a la educación y a la atención médica, así como por un salario digno, ámbitos que adquieren el carácter de urgente por la pandemia por coronavirus.

Esa urgencia está moviendo a algunos grupos de defensa latinos a apoyar inicialmente la campaña de Biden. Entre ellos, Voto Latino, organización que se centra en el registro de votantes y que por primera vez entrega su respaldo político a un candidato.

María Teresa Kumar, presidenta de Voto Latino, dijo que no fue una decisión fácil. Antes de su aprobación, su organización escribió una carta de dos páginas para comunicar sus expectativas a la campaña de Biden, cuya respuesta fue un plan de 22 páginas que aborda cuestiones como la inmigración y el acceso a la universidad.

“[Estos son] elementos que a menudo olvidamos, pero la verdad es que constituyen el punto decisivo para que los latinos dirijan su atención a la política y es de lo que Bernie estaba hablando”, dijo.

Este respaldo podría convocar a otros, que eran partidarios fervientes de Sanders u otros candidatos, como la senadora de Massachusetts Elizabeth Warren, que ahora se sienten a la deriva, según Kumar.

Jiménez, por su parte, también votará por primera vez este año. Ella llegó al país desde Ecuador con 13 años, ahora tiene 36 y ha dedicado el trabajo de su vida a los derechos de los inmigrantes.

“Como alguien que no podía votar hasta hace poco, pues crecí indocumentada y me convertí en ciudadana el año pasado, tomo muy en serio el poder de mi derecho a voto”, comentó la traductora.

Aclaró que Biden no era su primera opción; era Warren. Pero ahora ella está mirando más allá de un candidato en particular. Los costos de un segundo mandato de Trump son demasiado altos, tanto para ella como para los miembros de su familia que todavía no son ciudadanos.

Traducción al español por Melissa Harkin y Mónica Ramírez.

Rwandan genocide suspect found after decades; The dangers of ‘vaccine nationalism’; Probe launched after Trump ousts State Dept. watchdog

Rwandan genocide suspect found after decades; The dangers of 'vaccine nationalism'; Probe launched after Trump ousts State Dept. watchdog

By
The World staff

Readers look at a newspaper June 12, 2002 in Nairobi carrying the photograph of Rwandan Felicien Kabuga wanted by the United States. The United States published a “wanted” photograph in Kenyan newspapers of the businessman accused of helping finance the 1994 killings in Rwanda.

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George Mulala/Reuters/File Photo

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WHO chief promises review of coronavirus response, China defends its performance

WHO chief promises review of coronavirus response, China defends its performance

Director-General of the World Health Organization Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus attends a news conference in Geneva, Switzerland, February 2020.

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Denis Balibouse/Reuters/File Photo

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The head of the World Health Organization Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said on Monday an independent evaluation of the global coronavirus response would be launched as soon as possible during a virtual meeting of the WHO’s decision-making body, the World Health Assembly.

Chinese President Xi Jinping, facing global criticism over his county’s response to the coronavirus outbreak, defended China’s handling of the crisis but also backed the WHO’s review.

US President Donald Trump has fiercely questioned the WHO’s performance during the pandemic and led international criticism of China’s handling of the early stages of the crisis.

Tedros, who has always promised a post-pandemic review, said it would come “at the earliest appropriate moment” and provide recommendations for future preparedness.

“We all have lessons to learn from the pandemic. Every country and every organisation must examine its response and learn from its experience. WHO is committed to transparency, accountability and continuous improvement,” Tedros said.

The review must encompass responsibility of “all actors in good faith,” he said.

“The risk remains high and we have a long road to travel,” Tedros added, saying preliminary tests in some countries showed that at most 20% of populations had contracted the disease but most places that less than 10%.

Related: Is 2020 an economic write-off?

A resolution drafted by the European Union called for an independent evaluation of the WHO’s performance and appeared to have won consensus backing among the health body’s 194 states.

China has previously opposed calls for a review of the origin and spread of the coronavirus, but Xi signalled Beijing would be amenable to an impartial evaluation of the global response once the pandemic is brought under control.

“This work needs a scientific and professional attitude, and needs to be led by the WHO. And the principles of objectivity and fairness need to be upheld,” he told the meeting via video.

Calling the pandemic the most serious global public health emergency since the end of World War Two, Xi said: “All along we have acted with openness and transparency and responsibility.”

Wildlife origins

A draft of the EU resolution made no mention of China.

WHO and most experts say the virus is believed to have emerged in a market selling wildlife in the central city of Wuhan late last year.

A draft text of the EU resolution urges Tedros to initiate an “impartial, independent and comprehensive evaluation” of the  response to COVID-19 under the WHO “at the earliest appropriate moment.”

Diplomats said the United States, which suspended its funding of the WHO during the crisis, was unlikely to block a consensus backing the resolution.

But it could “dissociate” itself from sections referring to intellectual property rights for drugs and vaccines, and to continued provision of services for sexual and reproductive health during the pandemic, they said.

UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres called the WHO “irreplaceable.” South African President Cyril Ramaphosa said Africa affirms its “full support,” but assistance to the continent should include debt relief and help with diagnostics, drugs and medical supplies.

Barbados’ prime minister said Caribbean states need a restructuring of debt or a debt moratorium to “provide certainty to both borrower and lender” during the pandemic.

By Stephanie Nebehay and Emma Farge/Reuters

La conquista del voto latino en las elecciones presidenciales: Una historia de larga data

La conquista del voto latino en las elecciones presidenciales: Una historia de larga data

En su apuesta por la Casa Blanca en 1960, la campaña presidencial de John F. Kennedy atrajo a los latinos, que fueron esencialmente ignorados por otros candidatos. Él fue un visionario al reconocer a los votantes latinos como una fuerza creciente en la política estadounidense.

By
Daisy Contreras

El presidente John F. Kennedy y la primera dama Jackie están sentados con Lady Bird y el vicepresidente Lyndon Johnson en la cena de la Liga de ciudadanos latinoamericanos unidos (LULAC, por sus siglas en inglés) en Houston, el 21 de noviembre de 1963.

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Ted Rozumaiski/Houston Chronicle por medio de Associated Press

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Este artículo, publicado originalmente en Inglés, es parte de nuestra serie “Every 30 Seconds”, producida con el apoyo de la Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

En su apuesta por la Casa Blanca en 1960, la campaña de John F. Kennedy atrajo a un bloque de votantes que fue esencialmente olvidado por otras campañas políticas: los latinos.

Jackie Kennedy, la esposa del entonces candidato, salió al aire con su propio anuncio en español llamando a la gente a votar. El anuncio terminó con un “¡Viva Kennedy!”, eslogan que se convirtió en una frase unificadora para un grupo de organizadores políticos mexicoamericanos en Texas.

Esos grupos, que se conocieron como los Viva Kennedy Clubs, extendieron su presencia por todo EE. UU. y lograron posicionar los problemas regionales latinos, como la vivienda, el desempleo y la segregación escolar, como una prioridad en la campaña de Kennedy. De esta forma, el candidato obtuvo el voto de los mexicoamericanos y otros grupos latinos en estados clave como Texas e Illinois.

Esa fue la primera vez que un candidato para el cargo más alto de la nación trató de cortejar a los latinos, que en ese momento sumaban unos 6 millones, correspondiente a cerca del 3,5% de la población del país norteamericano. Kennedy fue un visionario al reconocer a los votantes latinos como una fuerza creciente en la política estadounidense. Los clubes ayudaron a retratarlo como un amigo, alguien con quien podían identificarse, pues era un católico irlandés que se preocupaba por los mexicoamericanos y otras comunidades latinas. Como resultado, Kennedy obtuvo alrededor del 85% de los votos mexicoamericanos ese año.

Los botones de la campaña Viva Kennedy!, del líder de los derechos civiles y fundador del Foro G.I., el Dr. Héctor P. García, abajo a la izquierda, se exhiben en la exposición de García en la universidad A&M-Corpus Christi, en Texas.

 

Credit:

Russell Contreras/Associated Press

Ignacio García, profesor de historia de la Universidad Brigham Young, en Utah, considera que el esfuerzo de Kennedy en 1960 fue la primera vez en que una campaña política tuvo éxito en ayudar a exponer los problemas latinos a todo el país.

Según él, la mayor parte de ese éxito se debió a que se permitió que los Viva Kennedy Clubs funcionaran independientemente de la campaña presidencial. Los clubes controlaban todo, desde quiénes serían los oradores que participarían en las manifestaciones centradas en los latinos, pasando por los logotipos, la recaudación de fondos y los carteles, hasta el propio el mensaje de Kennedy.

García incluso indicó que “había cosas de las que Kennedy nunca había oído hablar o que nunca prometió”. Por otro lado, “los latinos no tenían muchos antecedentes sobre acciones de este tipo, en las que se reúnen los políticos y los líderes políticos y sociales de cada comunidad. Aquí es donde vemos las primeras conexiones entre diferentes grupos latinos”, concluyó.

El presidente Lyndon Baines Johnson firmó la Ley de Derecho al Voto de 1965 en una ceremonia en la Sala del Presidente, cerca de la Cámara del Senado, en Washington, DC, el 6 de agosto de 1965.

 

Credit:

Associated Press

Movilización latina pos-Kennedy

Otros movimientos importantes que continuaron atrayendo el voto latino llegaron en 1965 y 1971.

Poco después del asesinato de Kennedy, en 1963, los Viva Kennedy Clubs se disolvieron. Sin embargo, algunos de los organizadores trabajaron arduamente con el fin de mantener en la agenda política los asuntos importantes para los latinos. Pero, en esta ocasión, no participaron bajo el alero de candidatos demócratas o republicanos. En cambio, crearon el Partido La Raza Unida y presentaron sus propios candidatos latinos en la papeleta.

La creación de este partido, también conocido como United Race Party, fue una estrategia para garantizar que los latinos y sus preocupaciones se tomaran en serio, especialmente porque los otrora partidarios de Kennedy sintieron que este no había cumplido sus promesas, a pesar de que habían ayudado a elegirlo en 1960.

Tal como lo habían hecho antes los Viva Kennedy Clubs, la influencia del Partido La Raza Unida también se extendió por todo el país y, aunque sus candidatos no siempre resultaron elegidos, el movimiento logró que muchos jóvenes latinos se mantuvieran comprometidos políticamente, según el análisis de García.

Mantener a los latinos comprometidos más allá de los clubes era una prioridad para los políticos latinos y otros organizadores políticos y, de hecho, tuvo influencia en la aprobación de la Ley de Derecho al Voto de 1965. El presidente Lyndon B. Johnson, al firmar la propuesta, se dirigió al Congreso y reconoció que “a millones de estadounidenses se les niega el derecho a votar debido a su color”.

Al mismo tiempo, comenzó a desarrollarse un movimiento paralelo en los estados del suroeste: los sindicatos y los trabajadores agrícolas se unían para exigir mejores condiciones de trabajo. El activista César Chávez, quien dirigió el sindicato United Farm Workers junto a Dolores Huerta, comenzó a apoyar a ciertos candidatos y a involucrar a más latinos en la política.

Nuevamente, las comunidades latinas se conectaron para presionar y exponer en todo el país los problemas y las prácticas que alguna vez se consideraron locales o regionales y el esfuerzo por una mayor representación política se fortaleció. Mientras tanto, la aplicación de la ley de inmigración se hizo más dura, lo que afectó a muchas comunidades latinas en EE. UU. y dio otro impulso a la organización con el fin de obtener leyes de inmigración más justas.

Ese fenómeno es muy parecido a lo que sucedió en 2006, muchos años después, cuando miles de personas salieron a las calles de las principales ciudades del país para protestar en oposición a las leyes contra la inmigración gritando “¡Hoy marchamos, mañana votamos!”.

Ese año, cuando era presidenta y directora ejecutiva del Consejo Nacional de La Raza, una organización que defiende los derechos de los hispanos o latinos, Janet Murguía afirmó que “debemos asegurarnos de trabajar en nuestras comunidades todos los días desde ahora hasta octubre, para registrarnos, movilizarnos y votar. Tenemos el poder para que se escuche nuestra voz en noviembre. Así vamos a seguir adelante. ¡Sí se puede!”.

Cómo los latinos podrían influir en las elecciones de 2020

Actualmente, a medida que se acercan las elecciones presidenciales de 2020, los grupos cívicos se movilizan más para lograr que se registren tantos latinos como sea posible para votar, que se tornan especialmente relevantes por el aumento en el número de votantes latinos con derecho a voto. Pero no es fácil.

Al respecto, García indica que “en muchos sentidos, los desafíos siguen siendo increíblemente difíciles y la gran dificultad para registrar votantes, la misma de siempre, es convencer a las personas de que participar realmente marca una diferencia”.

Según Pew Research Center, un récord de 32 millones de personas que se identifican como latinas tendrán derecho a voto en las elecciones presidenciales de 2020. Esta cantidad representa poco más del 13% del electorado, número que supera por primera vez a los votantes negros registrados y convierte a los latinos en el grupo de votantes más grande de la nación después de los blancos. Por eso, ahora es normal que los candidatos destinen millones a campañas de registro y divulgación de votantes latinos.

Además del registro, el desafío para los candidatos será lograr que los latinos salgan de sus casas y vayan a votar el día de las elecciones. Durante décadas, el voto latino se ha descrito como un “gigante dormido”. Hasta ahora, el gigante no ha despertado por completo: a pesar de los enormes aumentos en la población latina, su participación electoral históricamente se ha quedado atrás de otros grupos raciales y étnicos.

Ello, porque los negros y los latinos enfrentaban algunos obstáculos a la hora de votar, como tener que rendir un examen de inglés o pagar impuestos de votación, lo que tenía como resultado la exclusión de algunas personas del proceso de votación, incluidos los inmigrantes con derecho a voto.

Varios años después, en 1971, el presidente Richard Nixon redujo la edad mínima para votar de 21 a 18 años. Para García, “eso solo abrió puertas porque ahora las personas más jóvenes… tendrían la oportunidad de participar en el proceso electoral”. Así, se realizaron importantes campañas de registro de votantes en todo el país y grupos como el Southwest Voter Registration and Educational Fund y LULAC lideraron este esfuerzo

El líder de United Farm Workers, César Chávez, se dirige a una multitud en Los Ángeles, el 3 de noviembre de 1976.

 

Credit:

Reed Saxon/Associated Press

Al mismo tiempo, comenzó a desarrollarse un movimiento paralelo en los estados del suroeste: los sindicatos y los trabajadores agrícolas se unían para exigir mejores condiciones de trabajo. El activista César Chávez, quien dirigió el sindicato United Farm Workers junto a Dolores Huerta, comenzó a apoyar a ciertos candidatos y a involucrar a más latinos en la política.

Nuevamente, las comunidades latinas se conectaron para presionar y exponer en todo el país los problemas y las prácticas que alguna vez se consideraron locales o regionales y el esfuerzo por una mayor representación política se fortaleció. Mientras tanto, la aplicación de la ley de inmigración se hizo más dura, lo que afectó a muchas comunidades latinas en EE. UU. y dio otro impulso a la organización con el fin de obtener leyes de inmigración más justas.

Ese fenómeno es muy parecido a lo que sucedió en 2006, muchos años después, cuando miles de personas salieron a las calles de las principales ciudades del país para protestar en oposición a las leyes contra la inmigración gritando “¡Hoy marchamos, mañana votamos!”.

Ese año, cuando era presidenta y directora ejecutiva del Consejo Nacional de La Raza, una organización que defiende los derechos de los hispanos o latinos, Janet Murguía afirmó que “debemos asegurarnos de trabajar en nuestras comunidades todos los días desde ahora hasta octubre, para registrarnos, movilizarnos y votar. Tenemos el poder para que se escuche nuestra voz en noviembre. Así vamos a seguir adelante. ¡Sí se puede!”.

Cómo los latinos podrían influir en las elecciones de 2020

Actualmente, a medida que se acercan las elecciones presidenciales de 2020, los grupos cívicos se movilizan más para lograr que se registren tantos latinos como sea posible para votar, que se tornan especialmente relevantes por el aumento en el número de votantes latinos con derecho a voto. Pero no es fácil.

Al respecto, García indica que “en muchos sentidos, los desafíos siguen siendo increíblemente difíciles y la gran dificultad para registrar votantes, la misma de siempre, es convencer a las personas de que participar realmente marca una diferencia”.

Según Pew Research Center, un récord de 32 millones de personas que se identifican como latinas tendrán derecho a voto en las elecciones presidenciales de 2020. Esta cantidad representa poco más del 13% del electorado, número que supera por primera vez a los votantes negros registrados y convierte a los latinos en el grupo de votantes más grande de la nación después de los blancos. Por eso, ahora es normal que los candidatos destinen millones a campañas de registro y divulgación de votantes latinos.

Además del registro, el desafío para los candidatos será lograr que los latinos salgan de sus casas y vayan a votar el día de las elecciones. Durante décadas, el voto latino se ha descrito como un “gigante dormido”. Hasta ahora, el gigante no ha despertado por completo: a pesar de los enormes aumentos en la población latina, su participación electoral históricamente se ha quedado atrás de otros grupos raciales y étnicos.

La voluntaria Bea Nevarez habla con un votante potencial en Tucson, Arizona, el 31 de octubre de 2018.

 

Credit:

Caitlin O’Hara / Reuters

Eso es algo que Antonio Arellano, un organizador político de Texas, quiere cambiar este año y, para ello, señala que “no tenemos campañas de registro de votantes, tenemos lo que llamamos campañas de cambio cultural”.

Arellano participa en Jolt Action, una organización cívica latina cuya meta es aumentar la participación de los votantes latinos. A diferencia de los grupos que principalmente van de puerta en puerta o llaman por teléfono a votantes potenciales, Jolt está probando un abordaje diferente: el grupo está detrás de la nueva iniciativa Poder Quince o Quince Power, que busca inscribir en el registro de votantes a los invitados de la tradicional celebración de los quince años de las adolescentes latinas, fiesta que se conoce como “quinceañera”. La estrategia es que la cumpleañera ofrezca un discurso a su familia y amigos, generalmente un total de 100 a 200 invitados, en el que explica por qué la votación es importante para ella y los invita a registrarse en un stand, patrocinado por Jolt, que se ubica en un lugar de la fiesta.

La nueva estrategia de Jolt tiene sentido al considerar que los jóvenes latinos se han convertido en un gran bloque de votantes. A diferencia de sus padres y abuelos, la mayoría de los votantes latinos de la Generación Z (de 18 a 23 años), 95 de cada 100, nacieron en EE. UU. Arellano indicó que este grupo podría ayudar a Texas a pasar de ser un estado en el que tradicionalmente vence el partido republicano a ser uno en el que venza el partido demócrata.

Tanto es así que “este año nuestro objetivo es participar en 500 quinceañeras solo en Texas, estamos listos para movilizar a este electorado que tiene sed de cambio”, concluyó el organizador político.

Traducción al español por Melissa Harkin y Mónica Ramírez.

Little Manila’s ‘Meal to Heal’ effort brings food to Filipino health workers

Little Manila's 'Meal to Heal' effort brings food to Filipino health workers

Because so many Filipino Americans are on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic, it has taken a devastating and outsize toll on their community. A new initiative in New York City is bringing free meals to hospitals and health facilities heavily staffed by Filipinos — while also raising funds to help keep community restaurants afloat.

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Rosalind Tordesillas

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Filipino nurses on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic at Elmhurst Hospital Center in New York pose with donated food from Meal to Heal, a Filipino American community initiative.

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Courtesy of Rocco Cetera

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What history tells us about building climate coalitions

What history tells us about building climate coalitions

Author Matto Mildenberger examined how politics have shaped decades of climate policy in his new book, "Carbon Captured." He spoke to The World's host Marco Werman for this week's climate solutions segment. 

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The World staff

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Anna Kusmer

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Environmental activists of Swiss Klimastreik Schweiz movement hold banners, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, in front of the opera house on the Sechselaeutenplatz square in Zurich, April 24, 2020.

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Massive programs of green public investment would be the most cost-effective way both to revive virus-hit economies and strike a decisive blow against climate change, top US and British economists said in a study published last month. 

With co-authors including Nobel laureate Joseph Stiglitz from Columbia University and prominent British climate expert Lord Nicholas Stern, the findings are likely to fuel calls for “green recoveries” gathering momentum around the world.

Related: Amsterdam’s coronavirus recovery plan embraces ‘doughnut economics’ for people and the planet

“The COVID-19 crisis could mark a turning point in progress on climate change,” the authors wrote, adding that much would depend on policy choices made in the next six months.

With major economies drawing up enormous economic packages to cushion the shock of the coronavirus pandemic, many investors, politicians and businesses see a unique opportunity to drive a shift toward a low-carbon future.

But meaningful action on climate change will take a lot of political will.

Author Matto Mildenberger has examined how politics have shaped decades of climate policy in his new book, “Carbon Captured: How Business and Labor Control Climate Politics.”

Related: Mutual aid groups respond to double threat of coronavirus and climate change

Mildenberger is also a professor of political science at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He spoke to The World’s host Marco Werman for this week’s climate solutions segment. 

Marco Werman: Why is thinking about the politics of climate so important? What lens does it offer that is missed when we focus on the technical challenges of solving climate change? 

Matto Mildenberger: Collectively, countries around the world are not doing what it’s going to take to solve the climate crisis. Too often, we focused on not having the right technologies to solve the problem, or saying those technologies are too expensive, neither of which is really true anymore. We know we need to do it, and it’s cheap and profitable to do it. What matters is the politics of climate change now. 

So, you focused on Norway and Australia in your book. Why those two? And what did you learn about what works and what doesn’t work when it comes to building political coalitions to address climate change?

In Norway, we have really early action. They really started having a carbon tax, a carbon price, early in the 1990s; whereas, I think Australia is seeing the most political conflict over climate change than basically anywhere in the world. But here’s what you do learn, if we think about Norway, we think about Australia, and frankly, if we think about the United States: In all these countries, climate change actually disrupts some of the existing political coalitions that are out there.

We have workers on the left who depend on carbon-intensive jobs, and we also have businesses that depend on carbon pollution. And the same is true on the right when we have more business-friendly parties. A lot of the conflict over climate change actually plays out within the left and within the right. It happens within existing political parties and coalitions.​​​

Here in the US though, it does feel really left and right. I mean, the US has politicized climate change probably more than any other country on Earth. With the world’s strongest economic power in that position, isn’t that a huge barrier to action? 

A possible upside of the type of polarization we see in the United States is that when the Democrats are in power, there might be more appetite to undertake the type of disruptive climate reforms that are necessary to really solve this problem at the scale that we need to. It’s still an open question whether slow and steady, incremental progress that works at the margins is that going to be a better strategy, or might there actually be more opportunity in a polarized political system where, once in a while, the pro-climate actors seize control of power and really try and push forward on this issue.​​​​​​

So, we can talk about whether certain climate policies work from a technical perspective, but for talking solutions to climate change, what type of policies are the most politically successful?

For about 20 years now, carbon pricing has been one of the main tools in the climate policy toolkit. The idea of carbon pricing is that you, in some way, make companies and polluters pay for the costs associated with the harm they’re doing by releasing this pollution into the atmosphere. From a political perspective, this is a really, really difficult policy. It makes consumer costs really visible and the benefits of acting — all of the avoided climate catastrophe that’s going to happen in the next 10 or 15 years — is totally hidden.

And so, I actually think that there’s a lot of sense to foreground benefits and try and pass policies that are more like the Green New Deal that really focus on providing economic opportunities to workers in new industries. That’s really going to help generate a coalition that actively wants and desires change. And it’s also going to help split apart workers and businesses who have previously been opposed to climate policies by giving workers in fossil fuel industries new opportunities that will sort of bring them into a pro-climate coalition.

So, what gives you hope for the future when it comes to political solutions to climate change?

If we look at the extraordinary response that’s happened right now to the coronavirus pandemic, it’s helpful to think that the world can come together and sort of take the type of action they’re taking on COVID-19 right now, but applying it to the next big looming crisis. Go back a couple of months to the Democratic primary — presidential candidates who were proposing a $1.5 trillion to $2 trillion climate plan over 10 years were dismissed as fanciful.

And we’ve spent more than that in a couple of weeks under the CARES Act. I think that type of effort and renewed political response to crisis is happening all around the world. And if we can redirect some of those energies to the climate crisis, I think that we have a fighting chance over the 2020s to bring this problem under control.

This interview has been lightly edited and condensed for clarity. Reuters contributed to this report.