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As Poland’s Duda seeks election ‘Trump bump,’ Putin looks to revise history

As Poland’s Duda seeks election ‘Trump bump,’ Putin looks to revise history

By
The World staff

Producer
Joyce Hackel

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US President Donald Trump holds a joint news conference with Poland’s President Andrzej Duda in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington, DC, June 24, 2020.

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Carlos Barria/Reuters

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US presidents don’t usually meet with world leaders days before a presidential vote. But this week, President Donald Trump welcomed President Andrzej Duda of Poland to the White House just ahead of Poland’s national election this Sunday, in which the conservative Duda is running a tough reelection bid

From the Rose Garden, Trump, a Republican, did his best to give Duda a “Trump bump.” 

“I do believe he has an election coming up and I do believe he’ll be very successful,” Trump said.  

Related: Young people in Poland are rediscovering their Jewish roots

From her vantage in Warsaw, author Anne Applebaum says Duda’s photo-op with Trump might have gained him points at home. Or it might be a gamble that doesn’t pay off.

“… it was a kind of clear intervention in the election.”

Anne Applebaum, historian and author

“Those in his party thought that this meeting would be a kind of slam dunk reason to vote for him, and they played it up as a great diplomatic success,” Applebaum said. “Those who aren’t going to vote for him thought it was a very strange thing for the American president to do. I mean, it was a kind of clear intervention in the election. There was no other purpose to the meeting. There was nothing achieved. There were no documents signed. It was a long trip to get a photograph.”

Applebaum is a Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and expert on central and Eastern Europe. Her forthcoming book is called “Twilight of Democracy: The Seductive Allure of Authoritarianism.” Applebaum spoke with The World’s Marco Werman about the presidential meeting and Trump’s indication he may move US troops out of Germany to Poland — and how Russian President Vladimir Putin’s efforts at historical revisionism play into security considerations on NATO’s eastern flank.  

Related: How Russia laid the groundwork for future disinformation campaigns

Marco Werman: The two presidents have met one-on-one five times in recent years, three times at the White House. How do you understand their alliance? What can they actually do for each other?

Anne Applebaum: [From] Trump’s point of view, Duda is useful because he’s one of the few European leaders who openly admires him and openly wants to be around him and be seen with him. Most of the others have now become pretty wary. From Duda’s point of view — look, the United States remains very popular in Poland. NATO is very popular. And so from Duda’s point of view, it makes him seem like he’s close to the United States. Of course, this is incredibly risky from Duda’s point of view, because the next president, if it’s not Trump, might feel very differently about Poland.

Duda has also been pushing for additional US troops in Poland. He’s offered to build a Fort Trump in Poland. And just this week, President Trump confirmed he has plans to move more than 9,000 US forces out of Germany, sending some — not clear how many — to Poland. So if that does happen, what will be the upshot for NATO and security on Europe’s eastern flank?

Everybody in Europe would like to see the US commit more troops and be more present. The disturbing piece of the story is that it seems as if Trump’s reasoning for moving troops out of Germany isn’t to do with security or to do with calculations about where those troops would best be placed. It seems like it’s some kind of revenge against Angela Merkel, the German chancellor, who refused to come to Washington recently, saying that she didn’t think the timing was good and it wasn’t a good moment to have an international meeting in the middle of the pandemic.

Russia’s President Vladimir Putin and Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu leave after the Victory Day Parade in Red Square in Moscow, Russia, June 24, 2020. The military parade, marking the 75th anniversary of the victory over Nazi Germany in World War Two, was scheduled for May 9 but postponed due to the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19).

Credit:

Ekaterina Shtukina/Sputnik/Pool via Reuters

 So from the West, Trump talks about pulling out of NATO. In the east, Russia’s President Vladimir Putin has been offering up a revised history lesson. Putin just published in a conservative magazine a 9,000-word essay on World War II, defending the Soviet non-aggression pact with Hitler. He describes the occupation of Baltic states as “with consent.” How is it going over in Eastern Europe?

What he’s referring to is the Hitler-Stalin Pact. The two dictators actually divided Europe up between them. And so Hitler invaded western Poland. The Soviet Union invaded eastern Poland. And Putin now wants to rewrite that piece of history and somehow imply that it was Poland’s fault, that Poland got invaded and that it was somehow the Baltic states agreed to be invaded. There is no historical justification for it at all. Nobody is sure why it is that Putin has chosen to make this argument right now. I think it’s part of a bigger effort that he’s been making in recent years to rewrite the history of the 20th century in order to make the Soviet Union more heroic and to make our memories of it more heroic and triumphant.

Related: This pact between Hitler and Stalin paved the way for WWII 

Putin’s essay was being pushed precisely during this week of the annual Victory Day parade in Moscow, which was postponed because of the coronavirus. Is Putin in a position to celebrate “great power status” at this moment?

The kind of argument he’s been making to the Russian people over the last several years is, “OK, your wages are not going up. The economy is not great. There’s a lot of corruption. But I’m making Russia great again. I am restoring Russia. I’m putting her back in the center of world politics where she belongs. And you should keep me in power for that reason.” But the point of your question is correct. Russia remains a very dangerous, but medium-sized power. The Russian economy is weak, and it’s weakened partly by low oil prices. But it’s also weakened by really profound corruption and very profound inequality as well, which has caused a lot of discontent. There have been, just under the radar, on and off over the last couple of years, quite a lot of protests and a lot of dissent, not just in the big cities, not just in Moscow and St. Petersburg, but all over the country. And he’s very anxious to damp that down.

Related: Coronavirus postponed Russia’s Victory Day. For Putin, it’s a problem. 

I’m just curious. In Warsaw, is talk of this revisionist history making Poles at all nervous?

So whenever the Russians start to revise history, Russia’s neighbors become nervous because Russia has used historical revisionism as an excuse to invade its neighbors in the past. Right now, that seems unlikely. It doesn’t seem that Russia wants to pick a fight with the United States and with NATO at this exact moment. But, you know, we began this conversation by talking about the American president’s weak commitment to NATO. Maybe this is something that Putin sees in the future he’ll be able to take advantage of.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity. 

China flexes its muscles; US, India hit single-day COVID-19 case highs; Evil Corp targets corporate America

China flexes its muscles; US, India hit single-day COVID-19 case highs; Evil Corp targets corporate America

By
The World staff

Riot police disperse pro-democracy demonstrators as they take part a singing song protest at Mong Kok, in Hong Kong, China June 12, 2020.

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Tyrone Siu/Reuters

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Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

As the pandemic has grasped the world’s attention, China has been testing boundaries — both geographically and legally. Submarines in Japanese waters, incursions into Taiwanese airspace and deadly clashes with Indian soldiers in the Himalayas have been displays of China’s military assertiveness that are raising alarms in Washington.

In Hong Kong, Chinese lawmakers are keeping the details of a controversial national security law under wraps, possibly to avoid provoking additional outrage over the legislation. The law targets secession, subversion and collusion with foreign forces, and has been widely criticized as eroding Hong Kong’s autonomy. The full text is likely to remain secret until it goes into effect. It is expected to be approved next week.  

Father afield, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says he will not release Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou in exchange for two Canadians who were detained in China weeks after Meng’s arrest in Vancouver. And in Australia, a lawmaker is facing an investigation by national security agencies into alleged influence by China.

What The World is following

The US hit a record single-day high of 40,000 reported coronavirus infections Thursday. More than 2.4 million people in the US have contracted the virus. India also experienced a record 24-hour spike, as infections there close in on half a million. In Brazil, which is second to the US in case numbers, President Jair Bolsonaro says he may have previously contracted the disease.

Joyous news for sports fans in New Zealand and Australia, as they learned the Oceanic countries have won a joint bid to host the Women’s World Cup in 2023.

A Russian ransomware group is launching sophisticated attacks on corporate America as employees have shifted to remote work, The New York Times reports. Officials now worry about threats to election infrastruture. You’d be forgiven for thinking the hacking group took their name right out of the movies: They call themselves Evil Corp.

From The WorldIn Thailand, posting a selfie with a beer is a potential crime

A man drinks beer at a restaurant in Hanoi, July 20, 2009. In smaller markets in Southeast Asia such as Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam, drinking beer is becoming a popular pastime due to rising disposable income and relatively young populations who are embracing the party scene. 

Credit:

Kham/Vietnam Food Society/Reuters 

Under a sporadically enforced law in Thailand, it is risky to say anything flattering about alcohol on social media. You can’t hold up a bottle of bourbon in a selfie and grin. Or show off a pint glass with a Heineken logo. All of that runs afoul of a very vague crime: “Encouraging people to drink.”

Centuries ago, Spanish writers challenged gender norms and barriers

Portrait of Sor Inés de la Cruz (1648-1695), a nun of New Spain (Mexico) and contributor to the Spanish Golden Age.

Credit:

Miguel Cabrera/Wikimedia Commons

Think “Spanish literature” and you might come up with “Don Quixote” by Miguel de Cervantes. But there’s so much more to classic Spanish lit than the “Man of La Mancha.”

That’s the focus of an exhibition at the Cervantes Institute in Madrid, which looks at some of the most important — but largely ignored — women writers of Spain’s 16th and 17th centuries. Many of the women writers of Spain’s Golden Age were nuns, and some, like Catalina de Erauso, “The Lieutenant Nun,” challenged norms around gender expression.  

Morning focus

Two US Navy ships have broken the 161-day record for the most consecutive days at sea. The USS Dwight D. Eisenhower and the USS San Jacinto have gone 23 weeks without a port call in an effort to skirt the coronavirus pandemic — talk about a lockdown.

161 Days and Counting! USS Dwight D. Eisenhower @TheCVN69 and the guided-missile cruiser USS San Jacinto (CG 56) go into the @USNavy’s history book today as record-holders of spending the most consecutive days at sea – without one single port call #ForgedByTheSea #CSG10 pic.twitter.com/I4u4o1fWqO

— U.S. Central Command (@CENTCOM) June 25, 2020

 

In case you missed itListen: European Union set to reopen, but likely not to Americans

A police officer looks on as people enjoy the sunny weather on the beach, as Spain officially reopens the borders amid the coronavirus outbreak, in Barcelona, Spain, June 21, 2020.

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Nacho Doce/Reuters

The European Union is getting ready to reopen to international travelers after months of restrictions as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. But draft plans are expected to maintain limitations on travel from countries that have failed to bring the virus under a certain degree of control — including the United States. And, Russians began casting ballots on Thursday at the start of a week-long vote that could clear the way for President Vladimir Putin to stay in the office until 2036 if re-elected. Plus, the Eiffel Tower has reopened to visitors after being closed for three months amid the pandemic.

Don’t forget to subscribe to The World’s Latest Edition podcast using your favorite podcast player: RadioPublicApple PodcastsStitcherSoundcloudRSS.

Car crashes deadlier as drivers speed during lockdowns

Car crashes deadlier as drivers speed during lockdowns

A cyclist rides up 7th Avenue past the West Village neighborhood as streets remain less busy due to the continuing outbreak of the coronavirus in Manhattan, May 5, 2020.

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Lucas Jackson/Reuters

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The lockdowns in cities around the world because of the coronavirus led to huge reductions in traffic and fewer car crashes this spring, but as drivers sped up on quieter roads, the collisions became deadlier.

In New York City, the ratio of fatal crashes to all collisions rose 167% in April from a year ago. The increase was 292% in Chicago and 65% in Boston. Across the ocean, in Madrid, Spain, the rate of fatal collisions was 470% higher.

Even as traffic plummeted across the United States, roads became more lethal, with a 37% increase in fatality rates per miles driven in April, compared to the same month last year, the National Safety Council said this week. Last month, the group said in a statement that the lockdowns and reduced road congestion had created an “apparent open season on reckless driving.” In Britain, police documented instances of people driving at what they described as exceptionally high speeds of over 130 miles (209 km) per hour.

In the US state of Ohio, researchers found that while average speeds were up only slightly from March 28 to April 19 in Cleveland, Cincinnati and Dayton, the amount of extreme speeding increased dramatically.

“The level of extreme speeding is really shocking,” said Harvey Miller, professor of geography and director of the Center for Urban and Regional Analysis at The Ohio State University. “What we’re seeing here — the fact that there’s less traffic and more speeding — I think that’s evidence that traffic is a great controller of speed.”

Similar increases in speeding have been reported in Australia, Belgium and Denmark, according to reports compiled by the European Transport Safety Council.

Lessons learned

The road death toll, to be sure, has fallen as traffic ebbed in many places. In New York City, collisions plummeted in April to 4,103 from 16,808 a year ago, a 76% drop. During the same period fatal collisions decreased from 20 to 13, a smaller 35% decrease. But the number of fatal collisions per 1,000 crashes increased from 1.2 per 1,000 crashes to 3.2 per 1,000 crashes.

“When two vehicles collide at 20 miles per hour, that results in a fender-bender,” said Joe Cutrufo, a spokesperson for Transportation Alternatives, a group that advocates for safe streets and better biking, walking and public transit options in New York City. “When two vehicles and a pedestrian collide at 40 miles per hour, that results in a funeral.”

Cutrufo said the lessons learned during lockdowns should be used to rethink street design. Wide streets that look like highways attract fast driving, and more streets should be closed for cars so that people can use that space to safely bike, walk, sit and run.

Police in New York said they were aware of the increased speeds and had deployed additional patrols. Data from traffic analytics company INRIX shows speeds in New York City increased 44% from 28 miles per hour in April last year to 41 miles per hour this April.

In London, nine people died in traffic collisions in April, about the same as past years, according to data from Transport for London, a government body responsible for the city’s transport system. Collision counts are not yet available, but the number of fatalities remained steady even as the number of miles traveled in the British capital declined 69% from February to April, according to data provided by INRIX, which collects information on traffic and speed from fleet trucks, car manufacturers, GPS, loop detectors, parking meters and other sources.

Andy Cox, a detective superintendent who investigates fatal and serious road collisions for London’s Metropolitan Police, has taken to social media to implore drivers to slow down and not risk crashes that could put pressure on Britain’s National Health Service.

“They don’t think anything will happen to them and they are not considering their fellow road users and the wellbeing of them,” he told Reuters of drivers who speed. “It’s totally unacceptable. We need to recognize that speed is the biggest factor in fatal collisions and serious, life-changing collisions.”

Speeding offenses increased 187% in London during the lockdown compared to the same period a year ago, Cox said, but extreme speeding offenses increased even more — by 236%. Police documented speeds of 134 miles per hour in a 40-mile-per-hour zone, 110 miles per hour in a 30-mile-per-hour zone and 73 miles per hour in a 20-mile-per-hour zone.

Across the English Channel, collisions across mainland France fell from 4,234 in April 2019 to 1,099 in April this year, a 74% drop. During the same period, fatalities decreased from 233 to 103, a 56% drop.

Despite the overall drop in collisions and fatalities, the fatality rate among crashes was 70% higher.

By Lena Masri/Reuters

In Thailand, posting a selfie with a beer is a potential crime

In Thailand, posting a selfie with a beer is a potential crime

Under a sporadically enforced law in Thailand, it is risky to say anything flattering about alcohol on social media. You can’t hold up a bottle of bourbon in a selfie and grin. Or show off a pint glass with a Heineken logo.

By
Patrick Winn

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A man drinks beer at a restaurant in Hanoi, July 20, 2009. In smaller markets in Southeast Asia such as Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam, drinking beer is becoming a popular pastime due to rising disposable income and relatively young populations who are embracing the party scene. 

Credit:

Kham/Vietnam Food Society/Reuters 

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It was the sort of letter no one wants to receive: a government summons, alleging an offense against public morality.

The recipient was Niks Anuman-Rajadhon, a bar owner in Bangkok.

“They were basically asking me to come in for interrogation,” he said.

So, he obeyed, agreeing to meet with a panel of bureaucrats on the assigned date. His crime? They told him he’d been inducing people to drink alcohol online.

Related: Thailand’s beauty craze: ‘Milking’ snails to make facial creams

This was hard to dispute. Niks owns two cocktail bars and an import business called Vice Versa that specializes in boutique gin. Inducing people to drink is his job. His companies talk about their wares on Instagram and Facebook, as you do in 2020.

Pressing the officials for specifics, they told him: “you’ve been saying your alcohol, your gin, is ‘renowned,’” Niks said. “And that means you’re telling everyone how good your products are.’ They hate this.”

In Thailand, under a sporadically enforced law, it is risky to say anything flattering about alcohol on social media. You can’t hold up a bottle of bourbon in a selfie, and grin. Or show off a pint glass with a Heineken logo.

Related: They were CIA-backed Chinese rebels. Now you’re invited to their once-secret hideaway.

All of that runs afoul of a very vague crime: “Encouraging people to drink.”

“It’s quite universal, isn’t it? To have a beer, and post a photo, and invite your friends to come have a drink with you? That shouldn’t be illegal. We’re not selling drugs over here.”

Niks Anuman-Rajadhon, bar owner, Bangkok

“It’s quite universal, isn’t it? To have a beer, and post a photo, and invite your friends to come have a drink with you?” Niks said. “That shouldn’t be illegal. We’re not selling drugs over here.”

To many around the world, the word “Thailand” invokes a freewheeling place where you can down cocktails in the sand or indulge in a wild, neon-lit bar crawl. It can be that sort of place, especially for travelers.

But few tourists realize that there is a countervailing force in government that seeks to tone down boozy fun.

This faction has notched some major wins lately, thanks in large part to the coronavirus pandemic. Thailand recently joined South Africa, as well as parts of Greenland and India, in temporarily banning alcohol. The crackdowns were meant to keep everyone healthy and alert.

In Thailand, starting in April, bars were shuttered and 7-Eleven shops taped off their beer shelves. Teenagers caught boozing by the roadside were fined. The prohibition only lasted about three weeks, though conservatives pushed for more than 50 days. (The overall ban has been lifted, although bars and nightclubs must remain closed.)

This seems to have emboldened the anti-drinking faction, embodied in an agency called the Thai Health Promotion Foundation. It’s perhaps best known for using alcohol taxes to finance guilt-inducing videos.

Related: Thailand is betting big on cannabis. Visit its first legal lab.

In one fairly typical ad, a man — red-faced and wasted — pressures a passerby to drink during a period called Vassa or “Buddhist Lent.” This is a time when Buddhists are meant to forsake all vice.

The drunken man cries out that drinking is “not a sin!” as his skin begins to sizzle and he is plunged into a Buddhist conception of fiery hell.

Screenshot of Thai ad 

In recent weeks, riding high on their brief-but-successful prohibition, the anti-alcohol set has summoned hundreds of people for inducing the public to drink on social media. These crackdowns tend to come in bursts, levying fines on bar owners, beer importers and celebrities. (A petition condemning the law has racked up nearly 5,000 signatures.)

First-time offenders are typically fined the equivalent of $1,600. But a repeat offender can potentially face fines of $15,000 and even one year in prison.

A single word can trigger a summons.

Related: Your ‘recycled’ laptop may end up in an illegal Asian scrapyard

Another person charged under the same law — Chen Leu-Shyue, managing director of a craft beer importer called Beervana — was hit for using the word “refreshing” to describe beer on social media.

Chen was startled to learn the nature of his offense. If a beer distributor can’t claim his products are refreshing on Instagram, what else can he say?

“When we tried to ask why that was wrong, we were kind of shut down. From their perspective, anything we’re trying to do is considered illegal.”

Chen Leu-Shyue, managing director, Beervana

“When we tried to ask why that was wrong, we were kind of shut down,” he said. “From their perspective, anything we’re trying to do is considered illegal.”

“It’s getting to the point where people have to demand freedom of speech,” Chen said. “It’s a personal right for people to talk about things they like. So, why is alcohol considered not OK?”

So far, Thailand’s alcohol control board hasn’t targeted everyday drinkers — mostly models, singers and those immersed in the alcohol trade. But there’s nothing stopping officials from hitting a regular person with a huge fine just for posting a selfie with a bottle of beer. That seems unlikely — and charging a random tourist is even more improbable.

But Thailand is one of the most touristed places in Asia and every day (before the pandemic, at least) some uncountable number of travelers in Thailand post selfies with drinks in hand, oblivious that they are flouting the law.

For now, Niks said, the alcohol board’s agenda remains “so unclear. Anyone can get fined … and they can abuse this law so easily.”

This Latina teen says the pandemic will mark her generation — and shape her vote

This Latina teen says the pandemic will mark her generation — and shape her vote

By
Max Rivlin-Nadler

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Marlene Herrera, 18, is a first-time voter in San Diego County. 

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Adriana Heldiz/The World

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This story is part of “Every 30 Seconds,” a collaborative public media reporting project tracing the young Latino electorate leading up to the 2020 presidential election and beyond.

“Dale, dale, dale no pierdas el tino …”

About 20 friends and family members surround Marlene Herrera in her aunt’s yard in northern San Diego County. They’re mostly social distancing. The crowd sings in Spanish, urging her to not lose momentum. 

“Go, go, go, don’t lose your aim …”

Herrera wears a graduation cap and gown and swings a bat at two piñatas in the shapes of the numbers one and eight. She’s celebrating her 18th birthday and her high school graduation. Both events fell the week San Diego county began to relax its coronavirus restrictions on gatherings.

Finally, the piñatas break from their strings. The crowd cheers. 

Like many teenagers, Herrera has worked through a lot of frustration over the past few months. First, the pandemic hit. Then, she had to complete her senior year from home. During that time, she’s been living in a crowded house with five cousins under the age of nine, along with her younger sister, mother, and aunt. It’s hard to find space for herself or to do her work. 

In this new reality, Herrera said, she and many of her friends feel powerless. She’s been thinking a lot about mental health — and when she starts college this fall at San Francisco State University, she plans to major in psychology. 

“A lot of us were like, ‘I can’t believe this is happening,’” she said of the pandemic. “A lot of us got to the point where we burst into tears when we were picking up our cap and gowns. Even my mom, she was crying. She told us, ‘This is not what I expected for you, what I planned for you.’”

Related: Coronavirus upended her family. But this Latina teen is determined to make her vote count.

The mental health impacts of the coronavirus pandemic will be felt for years — especially by young adults, according to experts. And the stress they experience will impact their political behavior in the US presidential election this November, and for elections to come. 

“We’re going to be paying for this for a long time, because of the betrayals or the feelings of being left behind. Those are going to last for people.”

Tina Casola, family therapist

“We’re going to be paying for this for a long time, because of the betrayals or the feelings of being left behind,” said Tina Casola, a San Diego-based family therapist who specializes in trauma and the long-term impacts of stress. “Those are going to last for people.”

For Herrera, the pandemic means no graduation ceremony. No prom. After her preferred presidential candidate, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, dropped out of the race in April, she was undecided on who she would vote for in November. But with the protests over the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis and other acts of police violence against Black men and women, Herrera says she’s made up her mind.  

“I think I’m leaning towards Biden,” she said in a whisper. “Not that I’m entirely happy with him either.”

To her, President Donald Trump crossed a line when he sent in the National Guard during the Black Lives Matter protests. 

“You’re just adding to the fire. You’re fighting fire with fire. How is that OK?” she said. “I want a change.”

Related: Can Biden turn out Latinos to vote? Advocacy groups aren’t sure.

A pile-on of stress — and bills

Meanwhile, the stress piles on. Due to the pandemic, Herrera’s mother was briefly laid off this spring from her job at a law office. With many family members now living under one roof, the stimulus check her mother received from the government was a huge help. 

“It’s a big family here. We needed that,” Herrera said. “Especially the kids, because they are small. They have a very big appetite and a very fast metabolism.”

Her mother was eventually rehired after her office got a government loan. Still, Herrera wishes federal and local governments had done more during the stay-at-home order to prepare businesses to reopen safely. 

“For us, you can’t afford to not work,” she said. “We still gotta pay rent. That’s not going to stop. You can’t stop paying for food. You can’t just stay home. I don’t want to come home and be the one that infects my family for some reason.”

While young people in Herrera’s age group — known as Generation Z — are far more supportive of one another than previous generations, Casola said, they’re still looking to older people as models on how to get through the crisis brought on by the pandemic. 

“We have to figure out ways of getting into our communities and giving them support during this time. Even though none of us have the answer. We don’t have a blueprint for this,” Casola said. “But they need to benefit from some of the seasoning that we’ve had, in order to pull these things together and be able take care of themselves.” 

The pandemic and its mental health toll are not the only things on Herrera’s mind. 

She grew up always worried about her family’s finances. She also grew up in San Diego, a US-Mexico border region. And as a Latina from a low-income family, Herrera feels tremendous pressure from the US government. Though Herrera’s family members are all US citizens, the heavy presence of Border Patrol and Immigration and Customs Enforcement, along with uncertainty surrounding friends without permanent immigration statuses, have influenced her political perspective. 

“I just don’t want a government that is working against me. Like, I don’t want to feel like I’m fighting the government. They should be there for me.”

Marlene Herrera, 18, first-time voter

“Not even from a Mexican point of view, just talking as a person of color point of view. There’s been so much oppression we’ve had. And we’re seeing it right now,” she said, referring to the government’s response to protests against police brutality. “I just don’t want a government that is working against me. Like, I don’t want to feel like I’m fighting the government. They should be there for me.”

According to Casola, life as a Latina in a border town can both narrow one’s worldview, by limiting access to outside perspectives, and make it seem like this type of pressure is typical elsewhere in the country.

“Living in San Diego, it’s definitely different than if we go to other places and we have conversations about that,” she said. “Perspectives are so important.” 

The government’s response — or lack of response — to the pandemic has Herrera thinking about how politics directly impact her life. 

“As much as people want to say Trump is good, and that he did all these changes and I’m grateful for any changes he’s made, I think it’s time for someone new,” she said. “You can’t be living in the time of like, oh my God, what is he going to do now. What’s he tweeting? We’ve had so many scares with him.”

Looking ahead to a long summer of helping take care of her cousins and trying to safely see friends when she can, Herrera thought about what she would change about this year if she had a magic wand. 

“We didn’t get a graduation, we never got a normal graduation ceremony. No one got to get their yearbooks signed either. The last hurrah — you’re not going to get that.”

Marlene Herrera, 18, first-time voter

“Just my senior year,” she said. “We didn’t get a graduation, we never got a normal graduation ceremony. No one got to get their yearbooks signed either. The last hurrah — you’re not going to get that.”

Herrera thinks missing prom, not having a chance to say goodbye to her classmates, and facing deeply uncertain job prospects will forever mark her generation. 

Still, she was happy with what she could piece back together over the last few weeks. After her joint birthday-graduation party, Herrera said the best part of the day was finally being with her family and friends again in one place.

“It’s been over two months. I was like, ‘I get to see you again, I get to hug you. Wait, are you OK with hugging?’” she said, laughing.

SCOTUS rules some rejected asylum-seekers can’t challenge decisions

SCOTUS rules some rejected asylum-seekers can't challenge decisions

The ruling says immigrants denied asylum under streamlined proceedings, cannot contest that decision in court.

By
The World staff

Producer
Amulya Shankar

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A general view of U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, U.S., June 25, 2020. 

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Al Drago/Reuters

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Centuries ago, Spanish writers challenged gender norms and barriers

Centuries ago, Spanish writers challenged gender norms and barriers

An exhibit at the Cervantes Institute in Madrid focuses on some of the most important — but largely ignored — women writers of Spain's 16th and 17th centuries.

By
Amanda McGowan

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Portrait of Sor Inés de la Cruz (1648-1695), a nun of New Spain (Mexico) and contributor to the Spanish Golden Age.

Credit:

Miguel Cabrera/Wikimedia Commons

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Think “Spanish literature” and you might come up with “Don Quixote,” by Miguel de Cervantes. But there’s so much more to classic Spanish lit than “Man of La Mancha.”

That’s the focus of “Both Wise and Valiant,” an exhibition at the Cervantes Institute in Madrid, which looks at some of the most important — but largely ignored — women writers of Spain’s 16th and 17th centuries. The exhibit opened in March but closed due to COVID-19. Now the exhibit has reopened and will be on display through September. 

“What is surprising is that we haven’t known many of these female writers until very recently.”

Ana Rodríguez-Rodríguez, curator

“What is surprising is that we haven’t known many of these female writers until very recently. They are better known now, in the academic world, but not so much for the greater public. I think that’s something we have to keep working on, and that’s the idea of this exhibition,” said curator Ana Rodríguez-Rodríguez, who is also a professor at the University of Iowa. 

Related: In a new MoMA audio guide, security guards are the art experts

Catalina de Erauso, a writer known as “The Lieutenant Nun.” 

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Attributed to Juan van der Hamen/Wikimedia Commons

Rodríguez-Rodríguez explained that many of the women writers of the 16th and 17th centuries in Spain were nuns. 

“In the convent, which you usually see as a space of confinement and lack of freedom — which it was, in many occasions for many of these women — at the same time, it opened up the opportunity to be in touch with books, in touch with time,” she said.

Life in a convent could provide surprising privileges often not accessible to other women. 

“If you’re a woman who has to get married and is a mother or a wife, it’s not proper that you spend a lot of time writing, on reading and thinking about culture…” Rodríguez-Rodríguez explained. 

Related: Barcelona opera reopens to full house — of plants

Some of the featured figures in the exhibit challenged norms around gender expression. Rodríguez-Rodríguez points to a writer known as ”The Lieutenant Nun,” Catalina de Erauso. De Erauso was born a woman in Spain and was confined at a young age to a convent, but escaped to the American colonies to live as a man — and as a soldier. 

“Catalina de Erauso is one of these fascinating characters that we still need to keep thinking about and discussing because I think this person teaches us many different lessons, that they are good for our understanding of gender, even nowadays,” Rodríguez-Rodríguez said.

María de Zayas, novelist of the Spanish Golden Age

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Wikimedia Commons

Also featured in the exhibit is the friendship between novelist María de Zayas and playwright Ana Caro. Both were successful writers of the Spanish Golden Age who, nevertheless, faced many barriers because of their gender. To overcome those limitations, they promoted each other’s work in their own writing. 

“I think that that’s a wonderful example of female solidarity in the middle of oppression — which is what they really had to go through,” Rodríguez-Rodríguez said. 

Rodríguez-Rodríguez hopes the exhibit will help people rediscover these writers outside of academia. 

Related: Art, poetry and … zombies? The surprising cultural contributions of the 1918 influenza pandemic

“The canon has been very male-oriented for forever … or until very recently. It’s really time to make these women known — not only because they are women, but because they offer us wonderful texts, high-quality texts we have been missing since we have studied this time period,” said Rodríguez-Rodríguez. “This is a way we can make some change and give them the fair treatment they have been missing for centuries.”

Trump, Poland’s Duda discuss sending some US troops to Poland from Germany

Trump, Poland's Duda discuss sending some US troops to Poland from Germany

US President Donald Trump holds a joint news conference with Poland’s President Andrzej Duda in the Rose Garden at the White House, June 24, 2020.

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Lockdowns in Germany; Trump considering moving US troops from Germany to Poland; The Democratic Republic of Congo declares Ebola outbreak over

Lockdowns in Germany; Trump considering moving US troops from Germany to Poland; The Democratic Republic of Congo declares Ebola outbreak over

By
The World staff

A banner reading “Entering only with a face mask please — only 4 clients are allowed in the pharmacy” is pictured in front of a pharmacy during new outbreak of the coronavirus in downtown Wildeshausen, Germany, June 24, 2020.

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Fabian Bimmer/Reuters

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Top of The World — our morning news roundup written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

Germany’s populous Guetersloh and Warendorf regions became the first in the country to return to strict restrictions against the coronavirus, angering many residents. The lockdown measures enacted yesterday are meant to halt an outbreak in the northwest of Germany after more than 1,500 workers at the Toennies meatpacking plant tested positive for the virus. Another outbreak at a meat-processing factory in Wildeshausen alarmed health authorities with 23 people testing positive. Bavaria announced a ban on the roughly 640,000 residents from Guetersloh and Warendorf from entering the southern German state and Austria has issued a travel warning.

News of the lockdown in Germany comes as US President Donald Trump announced he’s considering moving some of the 9,500 US troops he’s pulling from Germany to Poland. Trump previously blindsided US allies in the region in announcing the withdrawal of troops from Germany. Yesterday’s comments from Trump came during a visit with Polish President Andrzej Duda at the White House — a meeting with no clear official purpose that appeared aimed at boosting Duda’s chances to win in Poland’s Sunday elections.

What The World is following

The Democratic Republic of Congo said today that the Ebola outbreak in the east of the country is over. The outbreak, which killed 2,280 people over nearly two years, is the second deadliest Ebola outbreak on record. The end of the epidemic there may offer lessons as the world grapples with the COVID-19 pandemic.

Sergei Khrushchev, the son of Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev, died on June 18 at his home in Rhode Island at the age of 84. The former Soviet rocket scientist moved to the US before the collapse of the Soviet Union to lecture at Brown University and became a naturalized US citizen in 1999. The World spoke to Khrushchev last year about the US-Soviet space race.

And while Germany is facing a new test to contain an outbreak of the coronavirus, France and the UK are starting to loosen restrictions.  The Eiffel Tower and the Louvre are set to reopen after lockdown, and pubs in England will open their doors — though likely not to Americans.

Black history is ‘integral part’ of British culture, says Black Curriculum founder

A teacher reads children a story on the grounds of St. Dunstan’s College junior school as some schools reopen following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in London, Britain, June 1, 2020.

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Simon Dawson/Reuters

What do students learn in the classroom about race and history? In the UK, an organization called The Black Curriculum has been pushing for Black history to be taught nationwide.

How Russia laid the groundwork for future disinformation campaigns

Russian BMPT armored fighting vehicles drive during the Victory Day Parade in Red Square in Moscow, Russia, June 24, 2020. The military parade, marking the 75th anniversary of the victory over Nazi Germany in World War II, was scheduled for May 9, but postponed due to the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19).

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Ramil Sitdikov/Reuters

In one chapter of her new book, “How to Lose the Information War,” Nina Jankowicz describes how relocating the Bronze Soldier statue in Tallinn, Estonia’s capital, exposed divisions between Russian speakers and Estonians. The Bronze Soldier was a controversial Soviet World War II memorial, which also served as a reminder to many of the 50 years Estonia spent under Soviet occupation. 

Jankowicz spoke with The World’s Marco Werman about how this controversy made Estonia vulnerable to a cyberattack over a decade ago that laid some of the groundwork for Russia’s future disinformation campaigns.

Morning meme

Following the restoration work to Elías García Martínez’s Ecce Homo resulting in the infamous Monkey Jesus at a church in Borja, Spain, the country now has another painting debacle on its hands.

Experts call for regulation after latest botched art restoration in Spain.

Immaculate Conception painting by Murillo reportedly cleaned by furniture restorer. https://t.co/YjtgTSohWB pic.twitter.com/iIkBDsKEkm

— Ticia Verveer (@ticiaverveer) June 23, 2020In case you missed itListen: Trump’s visa ban has technology companies worried

US President Donald Trump talks to reporters before boarding Marine One helicopter from the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC, June 23, 2020.

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Tom Brenner/Reuters

US President Donald Trump on Monday signed an executive order targeting several visa programs for foreign workers, including programs US tech companies rely on to hire highly skilled foreign workers. Experts say changes to the H-1B and other programs will push those workers, and potential innovation, to other parts of the world. And, the Lebanese economy is tanking, which has put tens of thousands of domestic workers in a tough situation. Also, a new exhibit at Spain’s Cervantes Institute looks at some of the most important — but largely ignored — women writers of Spain’s 16th and 17th centuries.

Don’t forget to subscribe to The World’s Latest Edition podcast using your favorite podcast player: RadioPublicApple PodcastsStitcherSoundcloudRSS.

Black history is ‘integral part’ of British culture, says Black Curriculum founder

Black history is ‘integral part’ of British culture, says Black Curriculum founder

What do students learn in the classroom about race and history? In the UK, an organization called The Black Curriculum has been pushing for Black history to be taught nationwide. 

By
Amanda McGowan

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A teacher reads children a story on the grounds of St. Dunstan’s College junior school as some schools reopen following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in London, Britain, June 1, 2020.

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Last Friday, the US celebrated Juneteenth — the day in 1865 when the news that slavery had ended finally reached Texas, over two years after the Emancipation Proclamation was issued.

Many Americans probably did not learn the history of June 19 in school. But the protests that came together after George Floyd’s killing in Minneapolis have brought attention to the way racism impacts every aspect of society — including what students learn in the classroom about race and history.

This reexamination isn’t just happening in the US. In the UK, an organization called The Black Curriculum has been pushing for Black history to be taught nationwide, as well as creating lesson plans and leading student workshops and teacher trainings.

Related: This African American in Ghana says making Juneteenth a federal holiday is a ‘small gesture.’ She urges police reform.

“In schools currently, the teaching of Black history is limited to Black History Month, which in the UK is in October,” said Lavinya Stennett, founder of The Black Curriculum

“What we see is a lack of narratives around Black people in Britain. That fundamentally is presenting a very false view of British history because we know Black people have been here since Roman times.”

Lavinya Stennett, founder, The Black Curriculum 

“What we see is a lack of narratives around Black people in Britain. That fundamentally is presenting a very false view of British history because we know Black people have been here since Roman times,” she continued.

The Black Curriculum has created lessons around a number of topics in Black history, including arts and culture, migration, law and the environment. 

    View this post on Instagram         

Our IGTV series, ‘Black British Women’ told the story of four inspirational women in Britain. 1. Olive Morris (top left) was a political activist, born in 1952 in Jamaica. Morris was an organisational and fighter against racism and sexism in the UK. 2. Lilian Bader (top right) was one of the first black women to join the British armed forces and was a Leading Aircraft-woman with the WAAF during WW2. 3. Mary Seacole (bottom left) was a nurse who greatly helped soldiers during the Crimean War. 4. Fanny Eaton (bottom right) is best known for her work as a model for the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood between 1859-1867. Did you enjoy our IGTV series? We now have a range of packages including podcasts, activities and animations available on our website! Visit www.theblackcurriculum.com/resources for more info🖤

A post shared by The Black Curriculum (@theblackcurriculum) on May 5, 2020 at 9:53am PDT

Stennett says some of those were inspired by things she learned from her own culture but were never discussed in a school setting. She points to the Notting Hill Carnival, one of the largest street parties in Europe, which was created by a Black woman named Claudia Jones who was born in Trinidad and Tobago.  

“I’m from a Jamaican background, and every year we have Notting Hill Carnival, and at home, we would play reggae music. So there were certain introductions in my personal life that I knew, in terms of my history and where it came from, but in terms of learning it at school there was no kind of introduction to that at all,” Stennett said. “That’s what our syllabus is about: It’s about bridging history with contemporary themes today.” 

Related: Police reform requires culture change, not just diversity, advocates say

Stennett says learning this history in the classroom not only empowers students but also makes them excited to learn. 

“When you’re confronted with new knowledge it can make you uncomfortable. But at the same time if you’re learning about your own identity and your own culture, it’s really powerful.”

Lavinya Stennett, founder, The Black Curriculum 

“When you’re confronted with new knowledge it can make you uncomfortable. But at the same time if you’re learning about your own identity and your own culture, it’s really powerful,” she said. 

    View this post on Instagram         

– I am no longer accepting the things I cannot change. I am changing the things I cannot accept 👇🏾 Angela Davis

A post shared by The Black Curriculum (@theblackcurriculum) on Feb 4, 2020 at 8:27am PST

Part of The Black Curriculum’s work recently has been to campaign for Black British history to be a nationwide requirement in schools. But Stennett says the organization received a response from the government Tuesday arguing that the national curriculum already provides teachers with the flexibility to teach Black history if they wish. 

Stennett said the response was disappointing, but that The Black Curriculum’s work would continue. 

“It just takes us back to why we’re doing what we’re doing,” Stennett said. “It’s really important that Black history’s not seen as an addition, but as an integral part of our culture. It’s British history. It’s not just for Black people and it’s not just about Black people. It’s about the nation and the future of Britain as well.”

EU may ban US travelers; Latin America sees COVID-19 surge; Palestinian officials call for probe into killing of youth

EU may ban US travelers; Latin America sees COVID-19 surge; Palestinian officials call for probe into killing of youth

By
The World staff

A man sits on his rickshaw waiting for clients, as Spain officially reopens the borders amid the coronavirus outbreak, in Barcelona, Spain, June 21, 2020.

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Nacho Doce/Reuters

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Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

Backpacking through Europe will likely not be an option for US travelers this summer. As the European Union looks to reopen in July, the bloc is working to prevent additional outbreaks of the novel coronavirus by blocking entry from countries that have had unsuccessful or haphazard responses to the pandemic — including the US. Visitors from China, however, are likely to be welcomed.

Travel bans have become synonymous with the Trump administration. The president sparked ire in March after announcing a ban against most European travelers, though that move did not prevent the US from becoming an epicenter of the virus, with more than 2.3 million cases reported.   

On the EU’s draft list of banned travelers, the US keeps company with Brazil and Russia, which are also deemed unsafe by the EU’s epidemiological criteria. In all three of these countries, leadership downplayed the virus and responses have been chaotic. This week, a Brazilian judge ordered President Jair Bolsonaro, known for his blasé attitude about COVID-19, to wear a mask in Brasília or risk fines, reminding the president that he is not above the law. 

What The World is following

The novel coronavirus is accelerating in Latin America and the Caribbean; official deaths surpassed 100,000 Tuesday, though the true number is likely much higher. The virus is plunging millions into poverty, and criminal corruption scandals are threatening more lives. And as the virus surges in impoverised regions, aid agencies are scrambling to deliver a lifesaving resource: oxygen

Palestinian officials have called for an international probe into the killing of Ahmed Erekat after Israeli soldiers shot the 27-year-old man and prevented medical aid from reaching him for more than an hour. Israeli officials say they suspected Erekat to be involved in a car-ramming attack. His family disputes the allegations, and human rights groups have condemned Israel’s excessive use of force.

Tennis star Novak Djokovic tested positive for the coronavirus after organizing a tournament in Croatia. And, Major League Baseball announced plans to open the 2020 season in late July. 

From The WorldAmid global protests, Jamaicans confront their own problems with policing

People hold posters as they take part in a demonstration against the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, at the Emancipation Park in Kingston, Jamaica, June 6, 2020.

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Gilbert Bellamy/Reuters 

Jamaica shares the United States’ history of colonialism and slavery, and now has one of the highest rates of fatal police shootings. Activists there are thinking about what the global moment of police accountability could mean for their country.

The World is hosting a Facebook Live on the Latino conservative vote titled. “The Latino Republican: Issues and influence in the 2020 election.”

Credit:

Graphic by Maria Elena Romero/The World

In the 2018 midterm election, about 30% of Latinos in the US backed a Republican candidate. But conservative Latinos are not a monolithic group, and they do not vote as a bloc. 

The World’s Daisy Contreras will moderate a Facebook Live conversation on Latino conservatives today, June 24 at noon Eastern time. Join us for the discussion: “The Latino Republican: Issues and influence in the 2020 election.”

Morning meme

Yesterday, we noted that in Spain, plants filled an opera house. In France? Minions take to the cinema. We assume Kevin, Stuart and Bob are watching “Despicable Me.”

Minions toys are seen on cinema chairs to maintain social distancing between spectators at a MK2 cinema in Paris as Paris’ cinemas reopen doors to the public following the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in France, June 22, 2020. 

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Benoit Tessier/Reuters

In case you missed itListen: Trump celebrates the border wall

US President Donald Trump arrives aboard Air Force One to visit a nearby US-Mexico border wall site in Yuma, Arizona, June 23, 2020.

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Carlos Barria/Reuters

President Donald Trump visits Arizona on Tuesday where he will make a stop in Yuma to celebrate the 200th mile of construction of the US-Mexico border wall. Most of the construction has been replacement segments. And, a monument to Winston Churchill in central London has become a flashpoint between Black Lives Matter demonstrators and far-right protesters. Also, after three months of darkness, the stage lights at a Barcelona opera house were flipped back on, suggesting a return to normalcy. But as musicians took the stage for a live concert, they looked out at an audience filled with potted plants.

Don’t forget to subscribe to The World’s Latest Edition podcast using your favorite podcast player: RadioPublicApple PodcastsStitcherSoundcloudRSS.

How Russia laid the groundwork for future disinformation campaigns

How Russia laid the groundwork for future disinformation campaigns

By
The World staff

Producer
Lucy Martirosyan

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Russian BMPT armored fighting vehicles drive during the Victory Day Parade in Red Square in Moscow, Russia, June 24, 2020. The military parade, marking the 75th anniversary of the victory over Nazi Germany in World War II, was scheduled for May 9, but postponed due to the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19).

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Ramil Sitdikov/Reuters

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More than 13,000 military personnel marched shoulder-to-shoulder, mostly without masks, in Moscow’s Red Square Wednesday. 

Russia was six weeks late to its annual World War II Victory Day parade, which is usually held May 9 — the country’s largest public holiday. 

Related: Coronavirus postponed Russia’s Victory Day. For Putin, it’s a problem.

This year, President Vladimir Putin postponed the celebrations marking the 75th anniversary of the Soviet Union’s defeat over Nazi Germany because of the coronavirus pandemic.

But Russia is still the third hardest-hit country in the world by COVID-19 — so why risk hosting a mega event, even if delayed?

One answer is that the celebration comes ahead of a key constitutional vote that would help Putin stay in power for two more terms.

Related: This pact between Hitler and Stalin paved the way for WWII

But there’s also an interesting history with Russia’s Victory Day celebrations, dating back to 2007 in the Baltic country of Estonia.

In one chapter of her new book, “How to Lose the Information War,” Nina Jankowicz describes how relocating the Bronze Soldier statue in Tallinn, Estonia’s capital, exposed divisions between Russian speakers and Estonians. The Bronze Soldier was a controversial Soviet World War II memorial, which also served as a reminder to many of the 50 years Estonia spent under Soviet occupation.  

Jankowicz spoke with The World’s Marco Werman about how this controversy made Estonia vulnerable to a cyberattack over a decade ago that laid some of the groundwork for Russia’s future disinformation campaigns.

Related: The human chain that unshackled the Baltic nation

Marco Werman: The Victory Day parade is connected obviously to World War II, and the triumph of the Soviet Union over Nazi Germany, which is tied to the story of Estonia and its more recent attacks by Russia in cyberspace. Those first attacks came in 2007, and it was all over — this will sound especially familiar now — a statue that got moved, the Bronze Soldier. Explain what happened.

Nina Jankowicz: When a new Estonian government decided to move this World War II statue and Tomb of the Unknown Soldier to the outskirts of the capital, Russia used this as a flashpoint, and for many years, this is where people were gathering, for instance, on Victory Day to mark the victory, of course, of the Soviet Union over Nazi Germany. And this was seen as a real slap in the face to the Russian population [in Estonia] and certainly was interpreted that way by Russia. And there’s evidence that Russia, the embassy, its security services, instigated riots that happened in 2007 around Victory Day in the moving of this statue, and then a cyberattack, which took down many Estonian media outlets. It took down parts of the Estonian government and banking system. And as a result, Estonia was one of the warning signals that this information war that we find ourselves in was coming.

Related: Countering Russian disinformation the Baltic nations’ way 

There’s this troubling scene where lawmakers in Washington were asleep at the wheel in response to the 2007 Russian cyberattacks on Estonia. Do you think now Washington is alert enough to the meaning of the entire constellation of threats to democracy in cyberspace, whether it’s coming from Russia or anywhere else?

I think we are waking up. Unfortunately, we’re still in bed, though, Marco. We’ve not fully gotten out of bed and really washed our face and clearly faced the threats of the day. Something that worries me every single day is the fact that disinformation has been politicized by both political parties in the United States. We need to recognize that it is not one political party that is going to always be victorious because of Russian or any other foreign disinformation. The ultimate victim is democracy. This is not a partisan issue.

And we need to equip our citizens, equip our lawmakers with that understanding that we will not stand for foreign interference or even domestic interference that is misleading voters about things like polling place locations and voting times. We’re seeing all of this happening because disinformation has been democratized and we need to fight back against that. And unfortunately, the Russian playbook is open to anybody who wants to use it — anyone with a social media account and a credit card. This stuff is not hard to do and it’s becoming more and more rampant unless we act soon.

Related: Analysis: Facebook is undermining democracy 

So you describe combating Russia’s disinformation techniques through “whack-a-troll,” kind of like the game, whack-a-mole. Explain that, Nina.

Sure. So, I think what we, the United States and many other countries in the West, have done so far is we’ve tried to fact check. We have tried to remove inauthentic accounts and inauthentic content from the internet. And that is a losing strategy because Russia is happy to allocate as much resources as necessary, whether those are human resources or monetary resources, to pump the information ecosystem full of misleading and divisive content. Their strategy isn’t a grand strategy where they know exactly what buttons to press at every time. It’s more like spaghetti at the wall — they throw it and they see what sticks and then they keep throwing that same sticky spaghetti over and over. And social media empowers them. It makes them able to do that.

So rather than playing “whack-a-troll,” I argue that we really need to invest in solving the root causes of these problems, solving what makes us so vulnerable to Russia in the first place. We need to heal the fissures in our society and heal the polarization that Russia weaponizes. And that means, first of all, that our politicians themselves cannot use disinformation tactics, because that makes us, as I mentioned before, totally impotent when we’re trying to push back against bad actors like Russia or China. But it also means investing in things like media literacy, digital literacy, civics, and, you know, restoring a democratic discourse, not only online, but offline as well. These are things that are generational investments, of course, but it’s important that we start them now because as the story of Estonia in 2007 shows, this has been something that Russia has been at for generations and it’s time that we catch up.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity. 

Colleges brace for steep drop in international enrollment this fall

Colleges brace for steep drop in international enrollment this fall

By
Kirk Carapezza

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Northeastern University sophomore Pavithra Rajesh, 18, took the last three weeks of her spring classes online from her parents’ apartment in Bangalore, India. Like many international students, Rajesh says she is unsure whether she will return to Boston for classes in the fall.

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Pavithra Rajesh, a Northeastern University sophomore from India, frantically packed her bags and boarded a plane home when the college abruptly shut down in March.

“I’m a very careful planner. … So, telling me that within three days you have to figure out where you’re going to go, move things into storage, figure out how you’re going to do online classes from a country whose time zone is so different from the one I’m in right now — it was pretty nerve-wracking.”

Pavithra Rajesh, sophomore student from India, Northeastern University

“I’m a very careful planner,” Rajesh, 18, said. “So, telling me that within three days you have to figure out where you’re going to go, move things into storage, figure out how you’re going to do online classes from a country whose time zone is so different from the one I’m in right now — it was pretty nerve-wracking.”

Related: International students are in coronavirus limbo. So are universities.

Back home, Rajesh quarantined herself in her parents’ apartment in the southern city of Bangalore for 14 days. The journalism major and theater minor took her last three weeks of spring courses online. India is 9.5 hours ahead of eastern daylight saving time. 

“Every night I was up till almost 3 a.m., 4 a.m.,” she said.

Looking ahead to the fall, Rajesh and her parents worry about her returning to campus in just two months.

“I’d be transiting through three very crowded airports,” she said. “The US right now has quite a lot of cases. It’s pretty vulnerable.”

So are the finances for universities like Northeastern, where more than a third of all students come from abroad — many from India and China — with most paying full freight. Hundreds of thousands of international college students sent home this spring are still stuck there because of travel and visa restrictions. Major colleges in the Boston area, which were already losing enrollment because of the anti-immigrant political environment, are bracing for losing still more students this fall.

The Trump administration had already been tightening travel and visa restrictions on foreign students and workers. Now, both the federal government and the pandemic are preventing international students who aren’t already in the US from returning in time for the fall semester. That’s all leading to a lot of confusion and anxiety for students.

“The pandemic, as well as the political difficulties between China and the United States, has ushered in a period of enormous uncertainty.”

Bill Kirby, history professor of Chinese studies, Harvard University

“The pandemic, as well as the political difficulties between China and the United States, has ushered in a period of enormous uncertainty,” said Bill Kirby, a history professor who teaches Chinese studies at Harvard University. 

Kirby points to a recent study by the Institute of International Education that finds nearly 90% of colleges expect international enrollment to decrease next semester.

“And some 70% anticipate that some international students won’t be able to get to their campuses for in-person classes this fall,” said Kirby, adding that the virus and uncertainty on campuses are damaging the country’s global relationship with China, India and other countries.

“Parents always worry about the health of their children,” Kirby said. “So I wouldn’t be surprised to see at least some pause, even if the world were to open up immediately, about sending students to a place where the public health systems are clearly not as robust as they are in Europe or Japan or Korea.”

If international students take their studies and dollars elsewhere, that would have devastating effects on Boston’s economy.

“We are — particularly in higher education — in a highly globalized and interdependent world. This is the most serious thing that’s ever happened [to American higher education] without any question whatsoever.”

Phillip Altbach, founder, Center for International Higher Education, Boston College

“We are — particularly in higher education — in a highly globalized and interdependent world. This is the most serious thing that’s ever happened [to American higher education] without any question whatsoever,” said Phillip Altbach, founder of the Center for International Higher Education at Boston College.

“International students spend a lot of money in this area, not only the direct tuition cost for universities but also housing and other expenses that they have around town,” said Altbach.

International students contribute about $4 billion to the state’s economy each year, nearly a tenth of the more than $40 billion they spend in the entire US economy, according to the Association of International Educators. Colleges that are overly dependent on international dollars are going to take a big hit, said Altbach.

“In the Boston area, that includes, of course, Boston University and Northeastern particularly, but also smaller schools like the Berklee College of Music, Emerson [College] to some extent,” he added.

Students and researchers from other countries bring significant brainpower to their work in the US, Altbach said.

“If you look at Silicon Valley or the biotech industry here in Massachusetts, international students, scholars and high-skilled immigrants are a key part of the labor force for these industries, so it’s a huge hit and a terrible mistake for the country,” he said.

It remains unclear how many international students will want — or be able — to return this fall.

Related: What the US can learn from other nations with free college tuition

This month, Northeastern announced its Boston campus and dorms will reopen in the fall and students will have the option to take classes in-person, online, or a mixture of both. This summer, the university is surveying thousands of international students about their plans for the fall and developing online platforms for any students who see a delay in returning to Boston.

Sitting in her room in Bangalore, Rajesh says she’s eager to get back in the classroom.

“I don’t think anyone can say that online classes will ever match up to the worth of an in-person class,” she said. “For me, doing three weeks of online classes from India was hard for sure. I don’t think I could do that same thing for three months.”

Still, she’s skeptical about whether students packed into dorms would be willing to follow social distancing guidelines and wear masks.

“There’s so many people, so little residence halls on campus,” she said. “I don’t really know how that is going to play out.”

EU travel recommendations may impede Americans and Russians

EU travel recommendations may impede Americans and Russians

Tourists are seen at a cafe in St. Mark’s Square a day before Italy and neighboring EU countries open up borders for the first time since the coronavirus outbreak, in Venice, Italy, June 14, 2020.

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Manuel Silvestri/Reuters/File Photo

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The European Union is planning to reopen borders for visitors outside of the bloc starting in July, but officials say reviews are underway for the status of the coroanvirus in countries and a document laying out criteria that could keep Americans, Russians and Brazilians out.

The 27-nation bloc is eager to restart tourism, which has taken a massive hit during the coronavirus pandemic, but fears of second spikes have so far only allowed for partial and patchy reopening of borders with multiple health and security curbs.

Draft recommendations from the EU’s current presidency Croatia, seen by Reuters, suggest allowing non-EU nationals in from countries with stable or decreasing infections, and those with a “comparable or better epidemiological situation” than Europe.

That epidemiological criteria is defined as between 16-20 new cases of infection reported over 14 days per 100,000 people.

Nations would also be assessed for their records on testing, contact-tracing and treatment, reliability of data, and reciprocal travel arrangements for EU residents, according to the document, to be debated by envoys in Brussels on Wednesday.

Based on the latest update by the bloc’s European Center for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), the proposed methodology could rule out travelers from the United States and Mexico, most of South America, South Africa, Russia, Iran, Saudi Arabia and Afghanistan, among others.

The United States, where President Donald Trump banned European visitors at the start of the crisis, has by far the highest number of deaths and cases in the world. [nL4N2AY3AS]

EU diplomats stressed, however, that the travel criteria could still change and that the recommendations will be non-binding.

“It seems there is a lot of wishful thinking in these recommendations. They are also causing much controversy. July 1 may slip and many countries may go their own way in any case,” a diplomat said of the proposal by the European Commission.

The proposal, aimed at promoting a coordinated approach, would cover Europe’s Schengen zone of normally-invisible borders that brings together most EU states as well as Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Lichtenstein.

A major achievement of post-World War Two European integration, it has suffered a major setback in recent months as countries brought back border controls to contain the virus.

By Gabriela Baczynska/Reuters

In Northern Ireland, police reform meant tackling institutional sectarianism

In Northern Ireland, police reform meant tackling institutional sectarianism

In 2001, Northern Ireland dismantled its repressive, and mostly Protestant, police force. The idea was to include more Catholics and to make the police more accountable to all of the people they serve after three decades of sectarian violence. Could Northern Ireland serve as a model for change in a deeply divided United States?

By
The World staff

Producer
Stephen Snyder

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A Police Service of Northern Ireland officer guards the road to the Lough Erne Golf Resort on June 06, 2013. 

Credit:

Cathal McNaughton/Reuters

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Northern Ireland saw violent clashes between Catholics and Protestants for three decades. Then in 2001, residents decided to dismantle its mostly Protestant police force and design a new one — one that would include Catholics.

What happened in Northern Ireland could provide some lessons for the United States, where there are increasing calls to defund or abolish police departments in the wake of the police killing of George Floyd last month.

The World spoke with Duncan Morrow, a politics professor at Ulster University in Belfast, about police reform in Northern Ireland and whether it could serve as a model for change in a deeply divided US.

Related: Police reform requires culture change, not just diversity, advocates say

Marco Werman: Obviously, what happened in Northern Ireland as the Troubles were ending is very different from the conversations we’re having about systemic racism here in the US today. But do you see similarities in these conversations about how to reinvent policing?

Duncan Morrow: We see similarities on so many different levels. One level is, we did have a real problem inside the police of what was called institutional sectarianism. It was the institutional aspect that was most complicated. That wasn’t so much the attitudes of officers. It was the way in which over years, Catholics just didn’t join the police. So, by the end of our Troubles, it was a 92% Protestant organization, and that was extremely problematic in a society which is more equal.

Why were Catholics not joining the police department?

From the very beginning of Northern Ireland, they never identified with the Northern Ireland state. And so, they basically regarded the police as the front face of that state. And so, being in the police in some ways for Catholics was always seen as somehow suspicious. And then on the other side, the culture that then developed inside the police obviously was dominated by, if you like, people from the other side of the community, from the Protestant side of the community. So, policing became nearly a Protestant profession.

Related: From Minneapolis to Madrid, racial profiling and police harassment cost lives

What would you say were the three most important reforms that really changed policing in Northern Ireland?

The first one, I think, was they ensured that the governance of policing, in other words, the oversight and the way police was organized really was accountable to the whole community. And they did that by creating what was called the policing board, which brought people in from all political parties, but also independents who had a technical ability. And the chief of police is responsible for giving an account to them of what he has done.

The second element, I suppose, was recruitment in order to ensure here that it was really a representative police force. They recruited people from the whole community very deliberately in the first 11 years through a process, which was called the 50/50 process. And that meant that 50% of the new recruits for 11 years came from a Catholic background. So, recruitment was very important.

And then the third element was probably accountability. We have a system of complaints where any complaint about the police goes to an independent body called the police ombudsman’s office. That complaint is handled by individual investigators and they also investigate, as a matter of course, any time when there is a death involving a police officer. And as a matter of course, any time when a firearm is used. So, all of those complaints run through an independent office. And that was to give confidence to people that it wasn’t being investigated from the side of the police, but really was being investigated in a fair and open process.

Did these changes and reforms work? Did they stick?

I think anybody in Northern Ireland would say they worked absolutely fantastically in some ways. In the sense that there’s been very few police deaths since. There have been very few instances where the police have actually been involved in use-of-force and in some circumstances, particularly where there is still a real deep controversy in this society around the old issues. And those tend to be for us around something called parades, where they become very controversial at certain times.

The police here have developed actually very interesting ways of trying to manage those, which involve liaison with the community, but also trying to minimize and deescalate the violence. So, I would say that overall it has been a huge success. At the same time, there are still issues. Relationships with police do continue to be complicated over certain issues, particularly over legacy issues from the past or where there’s a particularly controversial decision. And in some communities, it’s been more difficult than others to build those relationships. So, all of that is still true. But if you were to compare where the police service is 20 years later and where they were 20 years ago, it is almost night and day.

You gave a TED talk where you asked, how do you build a future after all the trauma? That’s an important question for us in the US right now. So, let’s ask it. How do you build a future after all the trauma?

There needs to be a commitment from the leadership that that’s where we’re going. So that is no longer about defeating the other, it is about actually agreeing to trade at least these different ideas of how the future will be shared in the future. The second thing, I suppose, is that there are a number of things, which we know we’re going to have to deal with, and I suppose for us, those are around some of the complicated issues of equality, which have to be faced and simply addressed.

And a lot of those are amenable to mathematics. Those are complex to trade and to work, but they’re still important to deal with. And those include justice questions and questions around policing. And then I suppose the third element is that some of this is open-ended. In fact, all of it is open-ended. We’re going to a place we don’t quite know. So, there is a requirement to build real dialogue across the community, a capacity for people to contribute. And what I called in that TED talk, a learning society, we are trying to get somewhere we haven’t been before. So, something which allows participation more widely than just through politics. It’s also important.

This interview has been condensed and edited for clarity.

Tamaryn – The Waves Lyrics

Come down to the surface
The surface reflects the light
Beneath the outer
The darkness obscures the light
Come down to the shallows
In contours
Out of the rivers
Your sea pours
Wait for the water
To claim you
Your sea returning
Into the waves
Into the wind waves
Into the waves
Curling heights
Back into the center
Receding from a further shore
Sinking familiar
Clinging to blackest floors

Come out to the shallows
In contours
Into the rivers your sea pours
Wait for the water to claim you
Your sea returning
Into the waves
Into the wind waves
Into the waves
Curling heights

Come down to the shallows
In contours
Out of the rivers
Your sea pours
Wait for the water
To claim you
Your sea returning
Into the waves
Into the wind waves
Into the waves
Curling heights

Soul Demise – Crows Gown Lyrics

It’s black, as coal
The language of silence
The nothingness, dark as the crow’s gown

The feather of the crow falls dumb and quietly down
In the grass you are laying in
It’s black as coal

To be afraid and intrigued at the same time
To look at the moon
To catch the beams with your eyes
To protect you against the nothingness

The wind plays the song of your innocent soul

Your true self is painted on your face
It’s grown pale by the moonlight
The soft vibration of the grass
Will be reflected by your hands
A tear will show happiness and fear
A symbol of their own captivity

Cloe Wilder – You & Lonely Lyrics

Can’t help but wonder what it is I do
That made you wanna walk away so soon
I pretend that I am doing fine, doing fine
I can’t replace you, start new every time

I’m talking bout you, who I thought I’d never lose
Didn’t think I’d have to choose between you and lonely
I’m still working through, I’m just so confused
Didn’t think I’d have to choose between you and lonely
Don’t make me lonely
Don’t make me lonely

Can’t help but wonder how this story ends
So you really think we’ll make it out as friends?
And if we aren’t then can we just pretend, just pretend?
And maybe one day we can try again

We said forever, but who’s keeping time?

Talk is cheap, forget it, never mind
Shoulda seen the signs I know your kind, know your kind
You’ll always be mine inside my mind

I’m talking bout you, who I thought I’d never lose
Didn’t think I’d have to choose between you and lonely
I’m still working through, I’m just so confused
Didn’t think I’d have to choose between you and lonely
Don’t make me lonely
Don’t make me lonely

I’m talking bout you, who I thought I’d never lose
Didn’t think I’d have to choose between you and lonely
I’m still working through, I’m just so confused
Didn’t think I’d have to choose between you and lonely
Don’t make me lonely
Don’t make me lonely

Surf Mesa – I Would Lyrics

[Pre-Chorus]
I would (If I would), I would (If I would)
I would (If I would), I would (If I would)
I would (If I would), I would (If I would)
I would (If I would), I would (If I would)
I would (If I would), I would (If I would)
I would (If I would), I would (If I would)
I would (If I would), I would (If I would)
I would (If I would), I would (If I would)

[Chorus]
I would, safe, I would
I would (I would safe)
I would, safe, I would
I would (I would safe)
I would, safe, I would
I would (I would safe)
I would, safe, I would
I would (I would safe)

[Pre-Chorus]
I would (If I would), I would (If I would)
I would (If I would), I would (If I would)
I would (If I would), I would (If I would)

I would (If I would), I would (If I would)
I would (If I would), I would (If I would)
I would (If I would), I would (If I would)
I would (If I would), I would (If I would)
I would (If I would), I would (If I would)

[Chorus]
I would, safe, I would
I would (I would safe)
I would, safe, I would
I would (I would safe)
I would, safe, I would
I would (I would safe)
I would, safe, I would
I would (I would safe)

[Outro]
I would (If I would), I would (If I would)
I would (If I would), I would (If I would)
I would (If I would), I would (If I would)
I would (If I would), I would (If I would)
I would (If I would), I would (If I would)
I would (If I would), I would (If I would)

Hardy – Nothin’ Out Here Lyrics (feat. Thomas Rhett)

[Verse 1: HARDY]
There ain’t nothin’ out here but dogs in the yard
And a couple John Deeres, some fallin’ down barns
Yeah, it’s pretty damn clear like lightning in a jar
If you passed it on the interstate, I bet you’d say
There ain’t nothin’ out here, there ain’t a skyline
If you seen it from a leer jet, I bet you’d ask why
Anybody down there would wanna live and die
Somewhere you gotta be lost to go, but they don’t know

[Chorus: HARDY]
We alright with that out-of-touch label
Turn that dirt into what’s on the table
And we don’t need no shiny good time
We’re fine with a county line kinda cold beer
Keep those dust-covered, rusted trucks running
You kissed on the bus, now you’re raising up youngins
All you’re gonna find windin’ through the country
Is some middle-of-nowhere folks
Makin’ somethin’ outta nothin’ out here

[Verse 2: Thomas Rhett]
Yeah, it ain’t nothin’ out here to wake up with the sun
Throw your get-‘er-done in gear, don’t quit until it’s done
Thank the man upstairs that gave you what you got
May not look like a lot outside lookin’ in
Oh, but then again

[Chorus: Thomas Rhett]
We alright with that out-of-touch label

Turn that dirt into what’s on the table
And we don’t need no shiny good time
We’re fine with a county line kinda cold beer
Keep those dust-covered, rusted trucks running
You kissed on the bus, now you’re raising up youngins
All you’re gonna find windin’ through the country
Is some middle-of-nowhere folks
Makin’ somethin’ outta nothin’ out here

[Bridge: HARDY & Thomas Rhett, HARDY]
Might live a little different out here
Might be a little simple, little slow like people say
But at the end of the day

[Chorus: HARDY & Thomas Rhett, HARDY, Thomas Rhett]
We alright with that out-of-touch label
We turn that dirt into what’s on the table
We don’t need no shiny good time
We’re fine with a county line kinda cold beer
Keep those dust-covered, rusted trucks running
You kissed on the bus, now you’re raising up youngins
All you’re gonna find windin’ through the country
Is some middle-of-nowhere folks
Makin’ somethin’ outta nothin’ out here (Woo)

[Outro: Thomas Rhett]
Yeah, we’re all makin’ somethin’ outta nothin’ out here
All makin’ somethin’ outta nothin’ out here

Kygo – Could You Love Me Lyrics

[Verse 1]
I’m sorry for all the stupid things I’m saying right now
I don’t know, I guess I just need to love myself
A little more before I love somebody else

[Pre-Chorus]
And I’ve been praying to be a better man for you, oh-oh, oh
I hope I’m changing (I hope I’m changing)
I just wanna be a better man for you, for you, for you

[Chorus]
Could you love me with all my crazy?
Could you look past all the goodbyes, all the maybes?
Could you love me with all my crazy?
Could you look past all the goodbyes, all the maybes?
Could you love me?
‘Cause I’m a crazy
Could you love me?
‘Cause I’m a crazy

[Verse 2]
I’m sorry for all the stupid things I’m doing right now, yeah, I know

I know I, I’m acting up destroying everything I love
Like I can’t help myself

[Pre-Chorus]
And I’ve been praying (Yeah, I’ve been praying)
To be a better man for you (Be a better man, oh-oh, oh)

[Chorus]
Could you love me with all my crazy?
Could you look past all the goodbyes, all the maybes?
Could you love me with all my crazy?
Could you look past all the goodbyes, all the maybes?
Could you love me?
‘Cause I’m a crazy
Could you love me?
‘Cause’ I’m a crazy

[Post-Chorus]
Could you love me?
Could you love me?

Lil’ Yachty – Whew’ Chile Lyrics

[Intro]
This shit sound like motherf*ckin’ Final Fantasy, goddamn
Zelda, some shit like that
Nintendo 64 type shit, no cap, ha
Go

[Chorus]
I don’t wanna be friends, that’s the old me (Uh-uh), ayy
Diamonds in my ears like anchovies (Ice)
My big brother by my side like Ginobli (Uh-uh, boom)
He a shooter, his percentage just like Kobe (Uh-uh, perfect)
Whew, child (Uh-uh)
She was suckin’ my dick like wow (Uh-uh)
Bein’ broke never was in style (Uh-uh)
Lil’ boy, go get your ass a job right now (Uh-uh)
Uh-uh

[Verse 1]
Niggas tryna stop my grind
Sixty racks into number nine’s (Number nine’s)
And I renegade y’all like Columbine (Columbine)
I be paranoid, move wisely (Oh)
Now my brothers got my back like Isley (Oh)
Just like ice box, got my brother’s new ice piece (Oh-woah)
Now hundred horses in that whip, it’s like lightnin’ (Skrrt)
Ooh, so enticing (Oh no)
Got that bitch up on her knees like the dice game
Got the money in a chokehold, no fightin’ (No fightin’)
Diamonds bitin’, I know these niggas hidin’

[Chorus]
I don’t wanna be friends, that’s the old me (Uh-uh), ayy
Diamonds in my ears like anchovies (Ice)
My big brother better by my side like Ginobli (Uh-uh, boom)
He a shooter, his percentage just like Kobe (Uh-uh, perfect)
Whew, child (Uh-uh)
She was suckin’ my dick like wow (Uh-uh)
Bein’ broke never was in style (Uh-uh)

Lil’ boy, go get your ass a job right now (Uh-uh)

[Verse 2]
It’s automatic (Auto), transcending (Tran—)
My bitch know that I am back bendin’ (Bend)
Rack spendin’, Bentley slingin’ (Slingin’)
Often totin’, quick to cause commotion (Commotion)
Rob from my brother like the last time
Play with me, he flashin’ red like a stop sign (Frrp)
f*ck a bad bitch, don’t care her skin tone like I’m colorblind (Frrp)
Don’t make ’em suffer, bro, spare that lil’ boy, he ain’t know

[Chorus]
I don’t wanna be friends, that’s the old me (Uh-uh), ayy
Diamonds in my ears like anchovies (Ice)
My big brother better by my side like Ginobli (Uh-uh, boom)
He a shooter, his percentage just like Kobe (Uh-uh, perfect)
Whew, child (Uh-uh)
She was suckin’ my dick like wow (Uh-uh)
Bein’ broke never was in style (Uh-uh)
Lil’ boy, go get your ass a job right now (Uh-uh)
Uh-uh

[Outro]
Whew, child (Uh-uh), whew, child (Uh-uh)
Whew, child (Uh-uh), number nine, whew, whew, child (Uh-huh)
Don’t go (Uh-uh), whew, child, whew, child (Uh-uh)
Whew, child (Uh-uh), I let it be, whew, whew, child
Whew, child (Let me be), I’m not your friend, don’t call me so (Uh-uh, whew, child)
Whew, child (Uh-uh), oh, no, whew, whew child (Uh-uh)
Child (Uh-uh), whew, child (Uh-uh)
Whew, child (Uh-uh), whew, child (Uh-uh)

Lee Brice – Songs In The Kitchen Lyrics

Songs in the kitchen
Playing on the radio
Coffee on the counter
Bacon frying on the stove
Billy Graham on TV
Mom and daddy kissing
Songs in the kitchen

Songs in the car
Fresh-pressed Sunday clothes
Momma putting on her make up
And daddy’s bible on the dashboard
Me and Louis in the back seat
Singing out of all our hearts
Songs in the car, yeah

All my dreams came true
My songs took me far away
Now I’m singing them every night
In these bright lights up on this stage
If you catch me close my eyes
Every now and then
To tell you the truth
I’m probably just missing

Songs in the kitchen
Songs in the car

Songs from the heart, yeah

Songs in the church
Choir a little out of tune
Preacher wiping his forehead
Us squirming in the pew
That old piano playing
Just as I am
Every time I sing every verse
Yeah, I wonder if I still can

All my dreams came true
My songs took me far away
Now I’m singing them every night
In these bright lights up on this stage
If you catch me close my eyes
Every now and then
To tell you the truth
I’m probably just missing

Songs in the kitchen
Songs in the car
Songs in the church
Songs from the heart
Songs in the kitchen
Oh, songs in the kitchen
Songs in the kitchen

Centhron – Deutsches Land Lyrics

Meine Rasse heißt Mensch und mein Gott bin ich
Und ein Rassist, der bin ich nicht
Ich bin deutsch und liebe mein Land
Doch warum stehe ich damit am rechten Rand?

Mein Leitbild heißt Respekt und ist mein Ideal
Und ob schwarz oder weiß ist mir scheißegal
Ein Germane soll die Zukunft sein
Ohne braunes Licht aus rechtem Schein

[Chorus]
Ich liebe deutsches Land
Tief in mein Herz gebrannt
Erstanden aus Ruinen

Im Geist der Freiheit dienen
Ich liebe deutsches Land
Tief in mein Herz gebrannt
Erstanden aus Ruinen
Im Geist der Gleichheit dienen

Die Treue sei kein leerer Wahn
Sie sei die Pflicht für jeden Mann
Die Frau geehrt, denn sie erhält
Das Licht in dieser toten Welt

Freude
Ehre
Stolz
Und Mut
Freude
Ehre
Stolz
Und Mut
Freude
Ehre
Stolz
Und Mut

[Chorus]

Scarlet White – Never Met Lyrics

[Verse 1]
I know I live in you, mother
That burden buried inside
The cause of sleepless nights, you’ve cried
Today is the day please don’t give me away
Don’t ever say goodbye
I need you to say hello

[Chorus]
If we never met
Would I be who I am now
Would I learn to love, without you here somehow
God gave me you
You’re the reason that I live
You’re a gift to this world
You were meant for this world

I know that you were made for me
You’re more than I could ever be

[Verse 2]
These times that we have shared are written in my story
In this book of love, I call “family”
Day after day, I put a smile on your face
You love me, you show me so much embrace
Don’t ever say goodbye
I need you to say hello

[Chorus]

[Bridge]
You have a choice to make
Life is not yours to take

[Chorus]

Taysav – PBG Music Pt. 2 Lyrics (feat. Bang Da Hitta)

[Verse 1: TaySav]

Bitch we some monsters
You can catch me at East Rogers
Where them killers should have been some lawyers, businessmens or doctors
Let me start off by saying free Shotta
Niggas know big bro was a problem
f*ck 12, 24th can’t stop none
And the opps ain’t on shit, nigga stop frontin’
Until they’re all out the way I can’t stop hunting
You never did shit, nigga stop frontin’
You don’t roll with the killers, got the opps ducking
You don’t walk up on ’em with the shots bussin’
PBG we really with the street shit
If a nigga talk slick, get his [?] hit
We the sharks, don’t swim to the deep end
Cause we might leave a f*ck nigga sea sick
If the narcs snatch me up I ain’t seen shit
I ain’t worry about a thing cause I keep blicks
Post with gangmembers we be on defence
We slide on hoes and fill their mouths with semen
Foreign rides is really all I be in
ICG is who I mainly be with
We slide trough the town like we TFG ‘nem
We ride trough [?] but we probably won’t see them
R.I.P Pap ’til the day we meet again
Each and every day I just pray we meet again
R.I.P all the niggas I never see again
We never letting up
[?] them niggas can [?] again
Fell off but I’m gon get up on my feet again
Hit him in his eye, make sure he don’t ever see again
Every nigga ’round me waiting to see me win
These niggas are my brothers
Whole time we [?]

[Verse 2: TaySav]
Bitch we some monsters
Lil bitch I’m with Mr Rogers
We be out here when it’s dark, wetting niggas up like water
If not we be chasing commas
Well you better stay safe like [?]
Cause these bullets tryna harm you
You a bitch lil nigga don’t start none cause
Them killers comin’ fast for me
Bullets blast
Have Diddy do the dash with me
And it’s never gonna be quite [?] for me
Lucci’s ass like Spazz you asked for me
He come do the task with me
Teach that lil boy a lesson like a class with me
He not even gotta come back and [?] me

Cause I’m right on the side when he blasts the heat
[?] gang got the baddest [?] 3 P’z
We the ones making havoc
We the ones putting niggas in them plastic sheets
Roll up watch his ass on a plastic screen
Big D eats bullets like batteries
Smoking dead opps, roll em in a [?]
3P’z ICG that’s the family
I just hope them real niggas don’t abandon me

[Verse 3: Bang Da Hitta]

[?] the gang
Niggas better respect the name
Before I let that 50cal go bang
Let me act my name, [?] their life get changed
Motherf*cker we ain’t playing no games
And we all got blicks nigga, we all with the shits
[?] opp [?] car getting flipped
Ride trough the strip
Niggas gon’ die in this bitch
Whole lotta homicides in this bitch
Don’t cry lil bitch, nigga
You’re a lil bitch, nigga
You’re facebook woofin
You’re really be cappin
You’re ain’t doing no hits, nigga
You dont want my niggas getting mad bop out, hit you in your shit nigga
Dissin’ them 3 P’z
[?] motherf*cker out here, get hit nigga
Late night with the thots they chosin’
They tryna get with this movement
[?] they snoozin’
Swear to god these opps be losin’
My niggas don’t play, my niggas get into it
These niggas want beef, my niggas gone do it
Like I told y’all nem’, PBG music
We’re not doing no cliquing so p*ssyboy move
Before you make a nigga lose it
The weed and the pills I abuse it
Cause it make a motherf*cker cool it cause I might just do it
[?] AK start shooting turn your face to a motherf*cking [?]
PBG, stupid
Take it to the [?] like [?]
My niggas go dumb like [?]
Tay stay around with the Uzi
Right by his side there’s Lucci
It’s a homicide when they shoot
And I merch that shit on G
Got a whole hood shot for [?]
And I don’t wanna hear shit from [?]
f*ck nigga don’t wanna see me
Put a f*ck nigga on that team
[?]
You know how we rockin’ in this bitch
Gang

Joe Hertler & The Rainbow Seekers – What It Feels Like To Drown Lyrics

[Verse 1]
We were caught in the pouring rain
And you asked me if I’d mind
If we could retreat to a secret place
Buried in the dust of time

[Verse 2]
You took me to the water’s edge
Our feet were bare; our hands bound
We waded till the current swept
Away the thoughts of our old town

[Verse 3]
The trees hung low along the river banks
Forgotten kings with tarnished crowns
They gazed as if they knew our names
And told us stories as the sun went down

[Verse 4]
By moonlight some ghosts did rise
Like memories from our childhood
With them we bottled fireflies
Lanterns for when we venture to darker woods

[Verse 5]
We leaned back into the summer breeze
Just as the rain came pouring down
Arms are spread as the water hit her face
This is what is feels like to drown

[Verse 6]
At that moment she took my hand
And said surrender to the stars now
Cause you’re nothing but dust my love
This is what feels like to drown

[Chorus]
This is what feels like to drown
This is what feels like to drown
This is what feels like to drown
This is what feels like to drown

[Chorus]
This is what feels like to drown
This is what feels like to drown
This is what feels like to drown
This is what feels like to drown

Hardy – Where To Find Me Lyrics

[Verse 1]
Kodiak lip packed, Busch Light six pack
Buzz, bay, thick bass hung up on the hook
The truck muddy, somethin’ funny, rolled up
Up and country music in the country, buddy, I could write the book
I got a boondock education
A dirt road church rock dedication
Yeah, when it comes to my location
We all already know where I be stayin’

[Chorus]
I be stayin’ in the woods or on the water
Top of a hill, down in a holler
Anywhere where I can unwind, drink a beer
Disappear, put the world behind me
Y’all, I was born in Mississippi
I’m a redneck, I’m a hick, I’m a hippie
So if the sun’s in the sky, if the red white and blue still flies
If the day ends in Y, you know where to find me
The middle of nowhere
The middle of nowhere
Yeah, you know where to find me
The middle of nowhere
The middle of nowhere
Check it

[Verse 2]
I prefer to kick it south of the Mason Dixon
I prefer my chicken fried chicken with some fixins
I’m a product of a southern breeze swayin’ them pine trees
Y’all, I can’t help it if I always wanna be…

[Chorus]
In the woods or on the water
Top of a hill, down in a holler
Anywhere where I can unwind, drink a beer
Disappear, put the world behind me
Y’all, I was born in Mississippi
I’m a redneck, I’m a hick, I’m a hippie

So if the sun’s in the sky, if the red white and blue still flies
If the day ends in Y, you know where to find me
The middle of nowhere
The middle of nowhere
Yeah, you know where to find me
The middle of nowhere
The middle of nowhere
Check it

[Bridge]
Rockin’ that dirt stain on my feet
Sweatin’ bullets, neck, I’m takin’ the heat
Friday football crowds at the small town
With a couple of places to eat
Whippoorwills, apple pie’s in the windowsill
Tractor tires and a rope hung on the oak
If you’re lookin’ for me, then you already know…

[Chorus]
I’m in the woods or on the water
Top of a hill, down in a holler
Anywhere where I can unwind, drink a beer
Disappear, put the world behind me
Y’all, I was born in Mississippi
I’m a redneck, I’m a hick, I’m a hippie
So if the sun’s in the sky, if the red white and blue still flies
If the day ends in Y, you know where to find me
The middle of nowhere
The middle of nowhere
Yeah, you know where to find me
The middle of nowhere
The middle of nowhere
Yeah, you know where to find me, yeah
The middle of nowhere
The middle of nowhere
Yeah, you know where to find me
The middle of nowhere
The middle of nowhere
Yeah, you know where to find me

Taio Pain – Tiraxtur Lyrics (feat. Dj Antoine)

As transfermarket says
We are top 5 in the world
We are tiraxtur viewers
Everybody knows us in the world
As transfermarket says
We are higher than Arsenal
We are tiraxtur nation
Everybody proud us in the world
Forty milion people shouts:
“yaşa Azerbayjan”
Forty milion people shouts:
“çox yaşa tiraxtur”
Seventy thousand raises the flags
Together deeply shouts
Forty milion people shouts:
“yaşa Azerbayjan”
Chourse:
70 مین نفرین سَسی گورولدادیر میدانی
گورد لار دیارین دا کی سَس ماراخلاندیریر دنیانی
آذربایجان یاشاساسین دیین لرین توپراغی
داماریمیزدان آخان قان، ترختورون بایراغی
Verse 1:
As transfermarket says
We are top 5 in the world
We are tiraxtur viewers

Everybody knows us in the world
As transfermarket says
We are higher than Arsenal
We are tiraxtur nation
Everybody proud us in the world
Forty milion people shouts:
“yaşa Azerbayjan”
Forty milion people shouts:
“çox yaşa tiraxtur”
Forty milion raises the flags
Together deeply shouts
Forty milion people shouts:
“yaşa Azerbayjan”
Verse3:
70 مین نفرین سَسی
گوردلار دیارین دا کی سَس
آذربایجان یاشاسین
داماریمیزدان آخان قان
“تیرختورون بایراغی
Th

Kygo – Feels Like Forever Lyrics

[Verse 1]
Felt the pull of the night calling from some greater meaning
There was guiding lights pulling me closer to an end tonight
When I saw you standing there like
Something from a dream calling to me
I knew there was no time to be wasting

[Pre-Chorus]
I asked if I knew you ’cause I felt a pull from some greater feeling
That took hold of me in that moment
And I know it’s childish of me to think such things, to say such things
But this really feels like forever tonight

[Pre-Chorus]
‘Cause I’d walk a million miles just to know your name
I know you said you felt love before, this ain’t the same
And I can’t let you go ’cause this feels like forever, ooh
Feels like forever tonight

[Chorus]
Feels like forever tonight
Feels like forever tonight
Feels like forever tonight
Feels like forever tonight
Feels like forever tonight

[Verse 2]
Took a taxi out under those city lights
Chasin’ dreams on a dime
There was no time to be wastin’

She said, “Don’t you say those words ’cause I
Think I feel the same”, I just
Stood there laughin’, she was
Dancin’ in the rain
She said, “Have you ever felt, like you been
Waitin’ your whole life, just for
One moment, just for one moment?”
She said, “Have you ever felt, like you
Waitin’ your whole life just for one moment”
This really feels like forever

[Pre-Chorus]
‘Cause I’d walk a million miles just to know your name
I know you said you felt love before, this ain’t the same
And I can’t let you go ’cause this feels like forever, ooh
Feels like forever tonight
‘Cause I’d walk a million miles just to know your name
I know you said you felt love before, this ain’t the same
And I can’t let you go ’cause this feels like forever, ooh
Feels like forever tonight

[Chorus]
Feels like forever tonight
Feels like forever tonight
Feels like forever tonight
Feels like forever tonight
Feels like forever tonight
Feels like forever tonight