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Genius azelyrics.net.ru .Lyrics

Fireboy Dml – New York City Girl Lyrics

[Chorus]
Fine girl from New York City
I don’t mind if you give me chance
Can I have just one more dance
Before you leave for the summer time
Runaway with me
I don’t care if you got a man
Can I have just one more dance
Before you leave for the summer time

[Verse 1]
She just came into town last month
And she won’t be around that long
I just wanna have a good time
Maybe once maybe two times
She got the prettiest smile
And she got the wittiest mind
Say before you catch that flight
Can I have a wickedest whine

[Chorus]
Fine girl from New York City
I don’t mind if you give me chance
Can I have just one more dance
Before you leave for the summer time

Runaway with me
I don’t care if you got a man
Can I have just one more dance
Before you leave for the summer time

[Verse 2]
She makes me sing
She always got me acting out
She’s like the wind
She’s just a traveler passing by
Maybe in another life
This feelings won’t die
Before you catch that flight
Can I have a kiss one time

[Chorus x2]
Fine girl from New York City
I don’t mind if you give me chance
Can I have just one more dance
Before you leave for the summer time
Runaway with me
I don’t care if you got a man
Can I have just one more dance
Before you leave for the summer time

Lil’ Yachty – T.d Lyrics

[Chorus: Lil Yachty]
Woah
I’m in this bitch like ayy, damn
I’m in this bitch like ayy
I’m in this bitch like ayy (Lil Boat)
I’m in this bitch like ayy
I’m in his bitch like ayy

[Verse 1: Lil Yachty]
I’ma need me a minute before I walk in, ayy
I’ma need me a bitch before it turn ten, uh
I’ma need me a front and backend, all cash stacked in
Rappin’ around town and I’m downtown
Big boy gat, I don’t back down
Take a bitch, yeah, I got a sack now
f*ckin’ bad bitches, I’ll blow a bitch back now (f*ck)

[Chorus: Lil Yachty & A$AP Rocky]
Woah
I’m in this bitch like ayy, damn
I’m in this bitch like ayy
I’m in this bitch like ayy (Lil Boat)
I’m in this bitch like ayy
I’m in his bitch like ayy (Uh, I’m in his bitch)

[Verse 2: A$AP Rocky]
Back to the bando
I Tokyo Drift like the sample
When shit wasn’t sweet and so simple
When it was just churches and candles
We ain’t have no Turks and no Caicos (Nah)
No fresh pedicure for the sandals (Nah)
We learned how to pedal, no handles
Back when we traveled, we trapped and we peddled right front of the Santos (Uh)
Like who wanna match? I’m runnin’ the maps
I run it like laps, they runnin’ in last
I might overlap and won’t double back ’cause my past is my past
They all from my path and part on my back
She wanted a bag, wanted some Raf
Mines came with a name, hers came with some change
We want the same thing, let’s not get offtrack (Yeah, uh, uh)
I’m up in that bitch skatin’ (Skatin’)
My wrist alone is the Ritz, I’m sayin’ (Bling)
Super Saiyan blonde, her lacefront on (Uh)
Nigga, don’t make me wait too long (Yeah)
Flippin’ rates of that Grey Poupon
I play you food for all
My bitch watch VH-1, first sixty days, RuPaul
She been around Tyler way too long

[Verse 3: Tyler, The Creator]
Um
It’s young T and he be that boy
I talk death, but I don’t like guns
I talk love, but I don’t got none
They talk charts, but they don’t got one
You got a stage, then it’s one-point-one for one hour
Niggas came second to me, they so sour
Had a slow climb, that’s why they all doubt ’em
And still came out on top, now that’s power (Uh)
f*ck they respect, I won’t miss a step, I won’t intercept
The tip of my tongue, I still got my soul and still got the check like
Bling, bling, bitch, I feel like Juvie
Raw as f*ck, bitch, I feel like sushi
Watch Blank Face and feel like Groovy
Neck lookin’ like a thot in labor
But it’s goin’ up like it’s an escalator
Boys goin’ down like Titanic sailor

Yachty here and him from Decatur
Flacko freer than a Costco plate of them samples, nigga
I’m ample, huh
When that suit come on, I throw a tantrum (Hoo)
That’s Igor, Igor, he a hot potato
Y’all small fries for example, nigga, um
Don’t run with the ride-a-long, nigga
I’m a catalog, I’m a human Adderall
Little ass bitch, nah, you ain’t in my category
Unicorn rare, better put a saddle on, nigga
Y’all rappity-rap, y’all critically ‘claimed, they gassin’ you up
I went to your show and took little nap (Trash)
That’s why we not in the same bracket of tax
I’m that nigga, bitch

[Verse 4: Tierra Whack]
I did it all with the passion, I’m a god in this fashion
Niggas tryna fit in with their arms in the jacket (Ugh)
Had to pull myself together like it’s all elastic
Got the heart of a dragon, I’m a star, call me Patrick
Heard the bitch was talkin’ shit, so I caught him in traffic
I’m the type to walk in your house and shit on your mattress
(Slow down, you’re spitting everywhere), ugh
I’m good, you could take it all away (Yeah)
I’m God, you follow me ’cause I know the way (God)
I’m in Philly and we all fly (Huh)
If we don’t got the whip, we do the walk-by (Yee)
On your new picture, we archive (Ugh)
If we cross paths, leave you cross-eyed
Had to slap a bitch, chose the wrong side (Ooh)
Mob ties, bitch, you get hog-tied, you chose the wrong side
Mrs. Whack, I love your flow, nobody rhymin’ like that
Had to clean out my trunk to put your mom in the back
The cops pulled me over, they don’t know your mom in the back
Big Whack makin’ niggas take herbal and naps
These hoes can’t rap, they need a permanent pack
I ain’t f*ckin’ with you boys, need the cervical cap
Okay, I’m bored
Okay, I’m tired
Sleepy, huh

[Verse 5: Lil Yachty]
Yeah, I don’t wanna be like nobody else (Else)
Lookin’ so good, I might ride myself (Self)
Realize I gotta hide the wealth (Wealth)
Told bro it’s okay to be rich and stealth (Yee)
Twenty-two, I might go f*ck a MILF (MILF)
My twin sisters both white as milk (Milk)
Maybach, inside came soft as silk (Silk)
Put a bitch on the molly, now she tilt
This bitch been killed, built like a crushed can
Makin’ rap friends more sketch than a white van
Billionaire Boat, more freedom than a white man
f*ckin’ on a bitch and she sound like a hype man
Lookin’ for a fly nigga, I’m what you type in (Go)
Been counted out since I could count (Yes)
Got a public and a private account (Yes)
For my bank and not my Insta’, bitch

Mero – Bogota Lyrics

[Intro]
Bogotá
Zehn Pakete im Motorroller
Die Wumme immer noch auf Schoß, Bruder
Und sie ist tödlicher als Corona
Meine Gegend ist wie Bogotá
Zehn Pakete im Motorroller
Die Wumme immer noch auf Schoß, Bruder
Und sie ist tödlicher als Corona (Ehm)

[Part 1]
Ich bin mit Akhis, wir fetzen Marmita, haben noch Na3na3-Tee da
Glaub mir, Choya, an dem Tisch sitzen keine Verräter
Day-Date und auch die Datejust, ich hol’ die Patek später
Zu viel Designer, heute français, morgen Italiener
Ich bin ehrlich, ich war ekelhaft (Ekelhaft)
Mit sechzehn Jahren mehr Straße gewesen, als du Piç in deinem ganzen Leben warst (Du Piç!)
Und was man in der Siedlung macht (Hah) bei uns in 428?
Wir ficken das Gesetz, weil man sonst keine Perspektive hat (Bo-bo-bo, bo)
Ey, zu viele Junkies auf Narc, Narc (Narco)
Tach-tach macht mein Tabanca, wenn ich es satt hab’ (Aiwa)
Platz da, ich lauf’ raus, denn ich bin ready (Ey)
Dreh’ paar Runden, bunkert der Kanak das Baggy vor sei’m Daddy (Vakuum, Zizzy!)

[Pre-Hook]
Egal ob Piecy oder Cannabis (Cannabis)
Locker easy, weil hier alles geht (Alles geht)
Und wenn du ziehst, gibt es auch Baba-Jay
(QDH, Motherf*ck)

[Hook]
Meine Gegend ist wie Bogotá (Ghetto)
Zehn Pakete im Motorroller (Pow-pow-pow, pow-pow-pow)
Die Wumme immer noch auf Schoß, Bruder (Locker easy)
Und sie ist tödlicher als Corona (Ja, Motherf*ck, brrah)
Meine Gegend ist wie Bogotá (Ghetto)
Zehn Pakete im Motorroller (Pow-pow-pow, pow-pow-pow)
Die Wumme immer noch auf Schoß, Bruder (Locker easy)
Und sie ist tödlicher als Corona (Ja Habibi, Motherf*ck; ehm, ehm)

[Part 2]
Ich hatte gar nichts, nur den Willen durchzustarten

Und ‘ne Gang, die motiviert war, keine Zeit mehr, um zu warten
Kam mit achtzehn in das Game, wusste, wie man entertaint
Die Rekorde steh’n noch immer (Ey, ey), nenn mich Mermi-Cendere (Ey, rrah)
Ich ficke Deutschrap, baller’ los wieder von vorn
Immer noch gleich, Mann, fick dein Tom Ford (Hah)
Mit ‘nem Sponsor mach’ ich mehr Para als du
Aber scheiß drauf, Bruder, das kommt vor (Heh)
Viele Träume, die zerplatzen, jedes Kind wird mal erwachsen
Hab’ was aus dem Nichts erschaffen und das ist nicht zu verachten (Rrah)
Immer noch schnell unterwegs (Eh)
Auch wenn die Welt untergeht (Eh)
Corona, Morona, orana, burana
Glaub es mir, keiner ist safe (Ja)
Es geht um Leben und Tod (Tod)
Ich seh’ nur Elend und Not (Not)
Ficke den Hype, alles nur Schein
Wallah, wir kämpfen um Brot (Brot, brrah)

[Pre-Hook]
Egal ob Piecy oder Cannabis (Cannabis)
Locker easy, weil hier alles geht (Alles geht)
Und wenn du ziehst, gibt es auch Baba-Jay
(QDH, Motherf*ck, brrah)

[Hook]
Meine Gegend ist wie Bogotá (Ghetto)
Zehn Pakete im Motorroller (Pow-pow-pow, pow-pow-pow)
Die Wumme immer noch auf Schoß, Bruder (Locker easy)
Und sie ist tödlicher als Corona (Ja, Motherf*ck, brrah)
Meine Gegend ist wie Bogotá (Ghetto)
Zehn Pakete im Motorroller (Pow-pow-pow, pow-pow-pow)
Die Wumme immer noch auf Schoß, Bruder (Locker easy)
Und sie ist tödlicher als Corona (Ja Habibi, Motherf*ck)

[Outro]
Und an alle die dachten, von Mero kommt nix mehr
Es hat neu angefang’n, 2020 wird noch ekelhafter als je zuvor
QDH, Motherf*ck!

Odyssey – Talk To Me Lyrics

Odyssey
Miscellaneous
Talk To Me
You got to talk to me, my love
Come on and prove your loving, show me heaven
Talk to me, my love
I wanna move my body, feel the rhythm
Talk to me, my love
You’ve got to prove your loving, show me heaven
Talk to me, my love
I wanna move my body, talk to me now
I wanna tell you heaven
I’ve been waiting for your love so long
Let’s get freak and let’s get it on
The pain of the ………….. is lost
You show me the way, the love and trust
Can you feel it, do you want it. I need it
I’m addicted to your loving so strong

I can feel the rhythm from dusk to dawn
You got the key …………………. me
The way you move me when you soothe me
Come with the silence, come my way
I’m standing beside you
I’ve got no other love to hide
It’s time to break the silence
So talk to me and I’ll feel all right
You’re taking the pleasure, I’m giving the pain
Talk to me, don’t be ashamed
Give it, feel it, want it, need it
…….. me, touch me, come and get it
…….. me, I can see
…………. before you talk to me
Got nothing to hide but the one
Talk to me, don’t tell me “No”

Attila – Perdition Lyrics

Standing lonely at the top I watch you drop
I’ve destroyed every single thing I touch
I’ve destroyed every single thing I love

Tonetta – Can’t Wait To Make Love Lyrics

My heart belongs
To you
Time has proved
A thing or two

What is the way
That you look at me?
And the way I stare at you
(Yeah) (Mhm) (My baby)

Fate is the date
When I met you, babe
Just then I knew
What’s mine is with me all the time

Love has no boundaries
No sex to distinguish the other from one
Love has proved, ooh, to me
With you, and [?], together we’ll be

Witness to see

I can’t wait to make love with you
Time has proved
A thing or two
What is the way
That you look at me?
And the way I stare at you

Oh, I can’t wait to make love with you
Oh, with you
I can’t wait to make love with you
With only you
I can’t wait to make love with you
Baby, with you
I can’t wait to make love

Riverdale Cast – Carry The Torch Lyrics (feat. KJ Apa)

There’s no warning
When everything changes
You let down your guard
And I saw something strange
I thought, “She’s not made for this world
And neither am I”
‘Cause you make me
Wanna be stronger than I am
And maybe I’m reaching

Misplacing and feeling
There’s no way to know but to try
So give me tonight
I don’t know much
But I know this feels right
So give me tonight
If you carry the torch
I follow the light
I follow the light

India – El Hombre Perfecto Lyrics

Quien se atreve a secuestrarme la tristeza?
A hacer con mi alma mil piruetas
Quien la puede desclavar
Y quien se atreve a descolgarme de mis miedos
Pasar la pagina el cuaderno
Quien derretira mi infierno
Y quien me hara resucitar, retazos de esperanza
Que se cansan de esperar….

Chorus:
El hombre perfecto nunca llega, alma traicionera
Manos en el fuego, sueos que se queman
El hombre perfecto dura poco, es una quimera
Vuelve a ser cualaquiera..
Porque casi siempre el amor se equivoca
Vuelve y se tropieza

Ei ie e..
Quien pretenda que en amores peregrinos que en vez
De pies lleven caminos
Sin atajos no hay andar
Ay!quien no entienda que impaciencia es enemiga
Buscando esclavos por la vida, tendra lejana su mitad
Y enciende velas sin altar, por eso escondo entre mis velas
Soledad
El hombre perfecto nunca llega, alma traicionera
Manos en el fuego, sueos que se queman
El hombre perfecto dura poco, es una quimera
Vuelve a ser cualaquiera..
Porque casi siempre el amor se equivoca
Vuelve y se tropieza

Discussion: The Latino conservative vote in the 2020 election

Discussion: The Latino conservative vote in the 2020 election

By
The World staff

The World is hosting a Facebook Live on the Latino conservative vote titled. “The Latino Republican: Issues and influence in the 2020 election.”

Credit:

Graphic by Maria Elena Romero/The World

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This Facebook Live discussion is part of “Every 30 Seconds,” a collaborative public media reporting project tracing the young Latino electorate leading up to the 2020 presidential election and beyond.

When it comes to the Latino vote in the US, there are two major assumptions: Latinos vote Democratic, and immigration is the most important issue for decision-making.

While the majority of Latino voters went for a Democratic candidate in the 2018 midterm election, about 30% of Latinos in the US-backed a Republican candidate. Over the years, the percentage of Latinos who have voted for the Republican party has stayed pretty consistent.

But conservative Latinos are not a monolithic group, and they do not vote as a block. Issues such as the country of heritage, socioeconomic status and how many generations a family has been in the US could shape their political perspectives and priority issues.

Join us for a Facebook Live on the Latino conservatives on June 24 at noon Eastern time: “The Latino Republican: Issues and influence in the 2020 election.”

The World’s Daisy Contreras will moderate the conversation with Geraldo L. Cadava, historian and author of “The Hispanic Republican: The Shaping of an American Political Identity, from Nixon to Trump.” 

Stella Chávez, a reporter for KERA in Dallas and Daniel Rivero, a reporter for WRLN in Miami — two of the eight reporters of The World’s “Every 30 Seconds” project — will be part of the conversation.

The US presidential election in November could be the first time Latinos are the largest minority group in the electorate. Young Latinos could swing the outcome of the election — if they come out to vote. That’s because approximately every 30 seconds, a young Latino turns 18 and becomes eligible to vote.

For the past four months, The World’s “Every 30 Seconds” project has been following the stories of eight young Latino voters in different corners of the United States, reporting on the issues, influences, concerns and challenges driving Latino decision-making and turnout for the election. It’s a collaboration with public radio stations across the US.

Will New START nuclear treaty survive ‘hostile’ US-Russia relations?

Will New START nuclear treaty survive ‘hostile’ US-Russia relations?

By
The World staff

Producer
Amulya Shankar

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US special envoy Marshall Billingslea speaks to the media after a meeting with Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Sergej Rybakow in Vienna, Austria, June 23, 2020.

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Leonhard Foeger/Reuters

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The United States and Russia have about 91% of the world’s nuclear warheads. And the arms control pact — the New START Treaty — between the two nations expires next year. 

The US wants to broaden its main nuclear arms control agreement with Russia to include all their atomic weapons, a US envoy said on Tuesday after talks with Moscow on a new accord.

US Special Presidential Envoy for Arms Control Marshall Billingslea also said Washington would keep pressing China to join the talks on replacing the 2010 New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (New START) which expires in February.

Washington wants Beijing involved because it says China is secretly racing to increase the size and reach of its nuclear arsenal, but Moscow favors a multilateral accord, possibly including France and Britain, Billingslea said.

“We, the United States, intend and believe … that the next arms control agreement must cover all nuclear weapons, not just so-called strategic nuclear weapons,” he told a news conference in Vienna that followed the talks there on Monday.

Matthew Bunn is a professor of the practice of energy, national security and foreign policy at Harvard University’s Kennedy School. He spoke with The World’s Marco Werman about the implications of the New START Treaty.

Marco Werman: What are the main points of the current agreement — the New START Treaty, or Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty — and would you say it’s been effective?

Matthew Bunn: The New START Treaty has been highly effective. Both sides agree that the other is complying with its key provisions. It limits the number of deployed strategic nuclear weapons on each side. We don’t face as many Russian nuclear weapons as we otherwise would. And it provides for an extensive set of monitoring and verification. So, we have more predictability and more understanding of what’s going on.

Related: China rebukes US envoy for photo stunt at nuclear talks with Russia

What’s at stake with this week’s negotiations? Where have the US and Russia settled at this point?

Well, it appears they made some progress. They agreed to set up some working groups on particular topics and to meet again, possibly in July. So that’s the good news. They have not yet agreed to any extension of New START. That’s the bad news. The further bad news is that the United States is still insisting on China taking part. And China has no interest in doing so. China has less than a tenth as many nuclear weapons as either Russia or the United States.

 

Related: US pulls out of Open Skies Treaty, Trump’s latest treaty withdrawal 

So we’ve got a presidential election in November. What signs are you going to be looking for that New START is on track and there will be limits on nuclear arms?

Well, I think we’ll have to watch these negotiations very carefully. I doubt the United States will actually withdraw. But I think that letting the agreement expire — about two weeks into the next president’s term, by the way — is a real danger. My guess is that the Trump administration will not agree to extend New START until the last minute. And so it may be a scramble if Biden is elected, for him to get it extended in the two weeks after he takes office. And I think that scrambling, in general, is not the right way to manage nuclear weapons policy. But I think it’s not just a matter of arms control. It’s a matter of the broader set of measures designed to reduce the danger of nuclear war. Right now, we have the most hostile and dangerous US-Russian relations in decades. We have technologies that are evolving that blur — the line between peace and war — and make it more difficult to prevent escalation from conventional to nuclear war. So there’s a big agenda of steps that have to be taken to reduce nuclear dangers. Ultimately, it’s the governments that have to take action.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity. Reuters contributed reporting. 

Police reform requires culture change, not just diversity, advocates say

Police reform requires culture change, not just diversity, advocates say

As demonstrations against police brutality and racism continue in the US and in other parts of the world, people who work with police departments to address biases and build ties with communities of color are questioning the effectiveness of their work. The World looks at the San Jose Police Department, which, despite its diversity, was criticized for its response to recent protests.

By
Monica Campbell

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Derrick Sanderlin, right, who trains police officers in rooting out bias, at a Black Lives Matter protest in San Jose, California, last month. 

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Courtesy of Derrick Sanderlin

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For years, Derrick Sanderlin volunteered as a trainer to help San Jose police officers to spot their biases. He also worked to improve their ties with African Americans like him, as well as the city’s large immigrant communities.

Then, on May 29, he participated in a Black Lives Matter demonstration in downtown San Jose. Things grew tense. 

“I saw a fair amount of innocent protesters just being shot with rubber bullets, some at point-blank.”

Derrick Sanderlin, volunteer anti-bias trainer

“I saw a fair amount of innocent protesters just being shot with rubber bullets, some at point-blank,” Sanderlin said. 

He stepped forward between the officers and protesters to plead for calm. A local ABC station showed what happened next: Officers pointed their riot guns at Sanderlin as he stood several feet away, not making any aggressive moves. Still, he was fired at several times, with one rubber-coated bullet hitting him in the groin. 

“It took me a second to really process the pain in that situation,” Sanderlin said. He needed emergency surgery. Doctors have told him he may no longer be able to have children. 

As demonstrations against police brutality and racism continue in the US and in other parts of the world, people like Sanderlin — who work with police departments to address biases and build ties with communities of color — are questioning the effectiveness of their work. Meanwhile, some police officers who are minorities and immigrants themselves say they feel torn over their own communities’ distrust of law enforcement. 

Related: From Minneapolis to Madrid, racial profiling and police harassment cost lives

Derrick Sanderlin, left, a community organizer in San Jose, California, speaks at a meeting of People Acting in Community Together, or PACT, a group that seeks to create a more just community.

Credit:

Courtesy of Derrick Sanderlin

Asked if he would work with the police department again, Sanderlin said he was not sure. 

“I have sorta held my tensions long enough, I think,” he said. “And if our city doesn’t make a serious change when it comes to how and when we depend on police, I think it would dramatically change how I participate.”

Among other things, he’s questioning what it means to have a diverse police force, a mission he has long believed in. 

“Diversity is important,” he said. “But if there’s even a small faction within the department that’s sort of determining how they view neighborhoods of color, you know, diversity kind of flies out of the window.”

Sanderlin is not alone in thinking this way. 

Tracey Meares is a professor at Yale Law School and founding director of the school’s Justice Collaboratory, which pushes for criminal justice reform that increases cooperation between individuals and the state.  

“What communities have been saying is that it is important for you to look like me and to reflect who we are,” said Meares, who also served on a task force created by former President Barack Obama to examine policing after the death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, in 2014. 

Still, she added, diversity alone is not enough. 

“I don’t think that you can expect necessarily that having a more quote-unquote diverse police force is going to advance the question about how people act related to bias,” she said. “That is not a project for the police department alone, again, because it’s about the structure of society that we live in.”

Stephen Donahue, a lieutenant for the San Jose Police who leads recruitment and hiring for the department, agrees. 

“It’s the culture in that department and it starts at the top and it disseminates its way down through the ranks to the officers on the street.”

Stephen Donahue, lieutenant, San Jose Police Department

“It’s the culture in that department and it starts at the top and it disseminates its way down through the ranks to the officers on the street,” he said.  

But like many others, he still believes diversity among officers is important. 

“We’re not all white people trying to police other people,” he said. “The minority of our department is white.”

The San Jose Police Department employs many minority officers. One of them is Silvana Cespedes, a patrol officer who was assigned to control the crowd at the May 29 protest in San Jose where Sanderlin was injured with a rubber bullet. 

“I was first in line at the protests, literally having rocks and bricks and flares — lit flares of fire thrown at me,” Cespedes said. “And obviously they’re ruining it for the people there exercising their rights.”

Cespedes was 18 when she moved to the US from Bolivia, where she believed police officers were corrupt. In the US, she said, she felt a difference. 

“I was, like, ‘Wow, police officers are just, like, good people’,” she said. “I could trust the police.”

As an officer for the San Jose Police, she said she has worked to build relationships in the heavily immigrant areas she patrols. 

“I am in the community, in all the outreach programs I can get into, trying to teach how to bond with the community,” she said.  

Recently, she started teaching her colleagues Spanish — a first for the department in an area with a huge Latino population. Other officers are learning Vietnamese, another commonly spoken language in San Jose. 

Cespedes values the diversity of her team: “I have someone from Mexico, from Japan, a Hispanic guy and then it’s me,” Cespedes said. 

She said she is hurt to hear more people say they don’t trust the police. That’s how she felt about police growing up in Bolivia. 

“It makes me sad because that’s a memory that I carried here, as an immigrant coming from a country where police interactions are not pleasant.”

Silvana Cespedes, patrol officer, San Jose Police Department

“It makes me sad because that’s a memory that I carried here, as an immigrant coming from a country where police interactions are not pleasant,” she said.

Despite all the recent protests, Cespedes said she is determined to keep working like always. Her immediate family supports her, she said, but not all of her relatives do. 

“Family members who — out of nowhere — start calling me a horrible person,” she said. “I don’t understand because they’ve known me my whole life and they just refer to me that way because I wear a badge.”

Malawians vote for president (again) amid pandemic 

Malawians vote for president (again) amid pandemic 

By
Halima Gikandi

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A Malawian woman waits to vote in a rerun of a discredited presidential election in Thyolo, Malawi, June 23, 2020. 

Credit:

Ernest Mwale/Reuters 

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As countries around the world debate how to move forward with national elections amid the coronavirus pandemic, millions of Malawians head to the polls on Tuesday to vote for president —  again. 

Related: Coronavirus exposes Sudan’s broken health care system

Earlier this year, the country’s constitutional court nullified the results of its presidential election in May 2019, when incumbent President Peter Mutharika narrowly won another term in office.

Malawians took to the streets to protest the results and reelection of Mutharika, who has been in office since 2014.

The opposition, led by candidate Lazarus Chakwera, took the matter to court last year, citing widespread irregularities.

“The court even says let’s nullify the elections because there were vast irregularities that affected the will of the people.”

Tadala Peggy Chinkwezule, president, Women Lawyers Association of Malawi

“The irregularities ranged from the use of different tally sheets [to] the correction of errors,” said Tadala Peggy Chinkwezule, president of the Women Lawyers Association of Malawi.

“The court even says let’s nullify the elections because there were vast irregularities that affected the will of the people,” Chinkwezule said.

In February 2020, in a 500-page ruling, the courts took a rare step to nullify the elections, ordering a new one within 150 days. They determined that candidates running for office would need at least 50% plus one of the votes. 

Voters like Jane Mtika, a party vendor in the capital city of Lilongwe, appreciate the second chance at a fair vote. She plans to vote for Chakwera, who is now backed by a coalition of eight opposition parties and is running on improving the economy and bringing jobs to Malawians.

“I hope Chakwera and Chirima will do whatever they can for us business service providers,” she said, arguing that the coronavirus pandemic and countrywide lockdown has worsened poverty and hunger.

“We are now starving, we don’t have money. We are just staying at home. Our workers are at their homes. That’s not good,” said Mtika, who first spoke about her struggles to The World back in April.

Related: Libyans are caught between coronavirus and conflict 

Boniface Dulani, a political scientist at the University of Malawi, says many Malawians are fed up with the leadership of President Mutharika, whose time in office has been marred by corruption scandals.

“The economy is certainly in a very, very bad and very fragile state. Our dependence on agriculture in times of increasing drought remains a big challenge.”

Boniface Dulani, political scientist, The University of Malawi

“The economy is certainly in a very, very bad and very fragile state. Our dependence on agriculture in times of increasing drought remains a big challenge,” Dulani said.

The election rerun also hasn’t been without its challenges and controversies.

“Apart from the logistical issues, including ballots, there are also other issues related to the financing of the election. The government has been quite reluctant to release funds to the electoral commission,” Dulani said.

In recent years, recurring droughts and natural disasters have contributed to food insecurity in Malawi. More than 50% of the country lives below the national poverty line.

Related: After Cyclone Idai, governments struggle to secure recovery funds

Chifundo Kachale, the new election commissioner tasked with managing the election, was only appointed two weeks ago. Voting ballots printed abroad only arrived in the country on Friday.

The pandemic has also brought worries that the large campaign crowds and election could lead to a spike in the coronavirus in a country that has so far seemed to manage the relatively few cases. 

It has also prevented outside election observers from entering the country. Still, lawyers like Chinwezule say they will be at the polls to make sure things are on the right track.

Barcelona opera reopens to full house — of plants

Barcelona opera reopens to full house — of plants

Writer
María Elena Romero

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The stage lights turned back on in Barcelona’s Gran Teatre del Liceu on Monday, a day after Spain’s three-month lockdown due to the coronavirus pandemic came to an end.

The show opened with the traditional announcement in Catalan asking the audience to turn their cell phones off and avoid taking photos. But the string quartet walked into an unusual performance. This time, they played Puccini’s “Crisantemi” to a verdant audience of 2,292 plants that filled the venue to capacity. No crowds were present — just plants from a local nursery.

Spanish conceptual artist Eugenio Ampudia created the performance as a way to highlight how art, music and nature can help people get through this difficult time of the pandemic. After the concert, the plants were donated to health workers.

“After a strange, painful period, the creator, the Liceu’s artistic director and the curator Blanca de la Torre offer us a different perspective for our return to activity, a perspective that brings us closer to something as essential as our relationship with nature,” read the event press release.

Related: Art during the coronavirus pandemic

The Liceu, located in the La Rambla area in central Barcelona, is one of the largest and most important opera halls in the world. The symbolic show comes as Spain slowly reopens after being hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic.

Spain ended a state of emergency on Sunday that was imposed to contain the spread of COVID-19. Spaniards are now allowed to move freely around the country — something they have not been able to do since March 14, when the lockdown was imposed. People are required to wear masks in public when social distancing measures cannot be observed.

Spain has recorded more than 245,000 coronavirus cases and more than 28,000 deaths.

Reuters contributed to this story.

When reform hasn’t worked: Part II

When reform hasn't worked: Part II

By
Sam Ratner

Police officers in Washington, DC, detain a man as they clear the entire area around Black Lives Matter Plaza during racial inequality protests near the White House in Washington, June 23, 2020. 

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Is the US ready for the rising tide of mercenaries?

Is the US ready for the rising tide of mercenaries?

War is getting sneakier. And mercenaries could be changing war in ways that the US might not be prepared for.

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Laicie Heeley

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Ruth Morris

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A boy walks near his building, which was damaged during fighting between the Ukrainian army and pro-Russia separatists as an armored personnel carrier (APC) of the Ukrainian armed forces stands near by in Avdeyevka near Donetsk, Eastern Ukraine, June 7, 2015.

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The Things That Go Boom podcast is a co-production of PRX and Inkstick Media, and is a partner of The World. This season on the podcast: What kinds of security risks are building out there? We’ll look at misinformation, shadow warfare and even ask if democracy is still in vogue.

In February of 2014, when war broke out in Eastern Ukraine, the top brass of the Russian army hatched a plan to support pro-Russia separatists fighting the government. Russia sent in what came to be called “little green men” — Russian soldiers, but in unmarked green uniforms.

And — they sent in a small band of mercenaries called “Wagner Group.”

Wagner Group only played a small role in the conflict, which led to the Russian annexation of Crimea. But the Russian generals deemed the mercenary experiment a success. 

Wagner became a mercenary army with about 5,000 members, active in about 12 different countries, from Syria, where it has protected oil fields for President Bashar al-Assad, to Venezuela, where it has provided security for President Nicolás Maduro, and all over Africa.

Today, these mercenaries could be changing war in ways that the US might not be prepared for. 

Episode 1: ‘World War C’: How did national security miss the coronavirus? 

Sean McFate is a professor at Georgetown University and a former paratrooper. He served under generals Stanley McChrystal and David Petraeus during his years in the US 82nd Airborne Division.

“But then I got out and went to, what they say, the dark side,” McFate said. “And I became a private military contractor, a paramilitary, some would say mercenary … to basically fight wars in Africa.”

Some of that fighting was for the US government — but some of it wasn’t. 

“It opened my eyes to … how wars are being fought,” he said.

The situation in Ukraine in 2014, when soldiers in unmarked green uniforms began popping up in the conflict, is useful to understand what McFate means. Because the Kremlin wasn’t openly sending troops, what was happening on the ground didn’t immediately look like a war between Ukraine and Russia — and the international community only realized what was happening once it was too late.

“If they had blitzkrieged directly into Ukraine, there would have been huge international outrage, the UN would have gotten involved, and it would have stymied their progress,” McFate said. “In this way, they just kind of stole Eastern Ukraine.” 

Episode 2: Was the US sleeping through China’s rise?

War is getting sneakier. We live in a global information age where weapons that give you plausible deniability are more powerful than firepower. And very few things offer better plausible deniability than mercenaries.

Why? If the Russian army takes a big hit, the Kremlin has a PR problem on its hands. If it’s Wagner contractors, the Russian government can deflect the blame. 

“Plausible deniability” isn’t the only reason Russia is using mercenaries. At the height of the Cold War, the Soviet Union’s Red Army was the largest in the world — bigger, even, than the United States, though, the US Naval and Air Forces seem to have balanced things out. When the Soviet Union collapsed, Russia’s new economy and its military took a big hit. 

But Russia seems to know how to stretch a limited budget a long way — that’s one reason why the use of mercenaries is such an attractive tool. Generally, private military contractors are considered cheap — you don’t have to pay for their training, employ them year-round, or pay veterans’ benefits, and in most cases, they come with their own weapons. 

And Russia isn’t the only country using mercenaries.

Related: It’s time for the US to rethink Huntington’s philosophy: Part I

“This rising tide of mercenaries — eventually, in a decade or two, we’ll get to a point where war is privatized, where anybody who can swipe a big enough check can become a superpower,” warned McFate. 

Of course, the US isn’t an innocent bystander. Blackwater, a private military company contracted by the US, caused a scandal in Iraq when contractors opened fire on civilians in the 2007 Nisour Square Massacre.

Blackwater Chief Executive Erik Prince holds a photograph of the remains of a blown up vehicle in Iraq while testifying before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee on security contracting in Iraq and Afghanistan on Capitol Hill in Washington, October 2, 2007.

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Erik Prince, the founder of Blackwater, has recently been pushing Washington to privatize the entire war in Afghanistan. Such a move wouldn’t likely save money, but there could be more menacing benefits. A Brookings Institution report found that contractor deaths are not listed on public rolls, and they’re rarely mentioned by the media. Plus, these firms aren’t subject to Freedom of Information Act requests, so hiding information from journalists is also much easier.

So far, the US hasn’t taken Prince’s advice — but it has signed more than 3,000 contracts with private military firms over the last decade, employing tens of thousands of people.

Most of these people aren’t armed mercenaries. They perform support tasks like training, cooking and delivering supplies. 

But the problem is what happens when those contractors themselves need protection. The US Army doesn’t provide any armed help, so contractors often need to hire their own security. A Congressional investigation from 2010 found that one US contractor relied on Afghan “warlords, strongmen, commanders, and militia leaders, who compete[d] with the Afghan government for power and authority.”

In 2010, The New York Times wrote that there are strong suspicions that an Afghan company, which provided protection to NATO convoys, used American money to bribe the Taliban to attack those same convoys — just to make sure the demand for protection remained high.

A NATO official in Kabul said it most clearly: “We’re funding both sides of the war.”

“We’ve helped create a whole global mercenary marketplace,” said McFate. 

Last season on Things That Go Boom: Nothing good happens after ‘nuclear midnight’

It might be terrifying to think of a world where individuals can go out and hire mercenaries. But we already live in a world where organizations like Wagner Group can fight wars more or less in secret.

So, how does the US military deal with this problem?

“When Americans think about war, our model for war is World War II. We call it ‘the good war.’ It’s what we teach in war colleges,” McFate said, adding that World War II still informs how American generals think about the future of war.

Right now, the US is still mostly stocking its shelves for the apocalypse — buying the kind of big, expensive things it thinks it might need for WWIII. But, McFate says, WWIII isn’t going to look anything like WWII. And US adversaries are investing their own resources completely differently.

“What they’re doing is they’re investing in other places, like the troll factory, their internet hackers, Wagner Group, other sort of clandestine means.” 

And that means something in the US has to change.

Related: Is a US-China nuclear conflict likely?

“We don’t need to scrap … our superlative conventional forces. We have the best in the world, but we don’t need $13 billion new aircraft carriers either,” McFate said. “So, let’s stop throwing money into things that we’re already good at. Let’s throw money into things we need help in. And so, that includes strategic communication.” 

A lot of the world has moved on to a new form of war — one it’s already actively fighting in the shadows. And the US is still sitting in its bunker, waiting for the blitz.

“What we need to do is we need to update the way we think about war,” McFate said. “If war is going underground to the shadows, we have to go into the ground and punch back. So, how do we fight secret wars, which is where warfare is today, and not lose your Democratic soul? That’s the discourse we should be having, not how many F-35s we need — that’s the discourse Lockheed wants you to have.”

This isn’t the whole story. To hear more, including what a hot dog salesman and actress Mia Farrow have to do with all of this, listen above and subscribe to the Things That Go Boom podcast

Trump announces new visa restrictions; Saudi Arabia planning only a limited Hajj; White House trade adviser walks back comments

Trump announces new visa restrictions; Saudi Arabia planning only a limited Hajj; White House trade adviser walks back comments

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The World staff

US President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at the BOK Center in Tulsa, Oklahoma, June 20, 2020.

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Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

US President Donald Trump temporarily suspended the issuance of new work visas for certain foreign workers yesterday, a move widely opposed by business groups. Trump’s presidential proclamation bars most H-1B visas for skilled employees as well as H-2B seasonal worker visas. It also restricts some H-4, J-1, and L-1 visas. Tech companies like Amazon, Google and Twitter, who rely heavily on the H-1B visas, are objecting to the directive.

The White House said the move would help the economy rebound amid the coronavirus crisis and that targeted visa categories pose “a risk of displacing and disadvantaging United States workers during the current recovery.” Critics argue the order is part of the Trump administration’s broader efforts to curb immigration.

The visa suspension, which exempts those already in the US and visa holders abroad, as well as some agricultural, health care and food industry workers, takes effect Wednesday and lasts until the end of the year.

What The World is following

Saudi Arabia said yesterday it plans to allow only a limited Hajj this year because of the coronavirus pandemic. The announcement bars foreign travelers, allowing only people already living in the kingdom to make the religious pilgrimage. As many as 2 million people come to the holy city of Mecca every year for the Hajj.

White House trade adviser Peter Navarro said Monday on Fox News that the China trade deal was “over.” The comment stoked volatility in markets. Later, Navarro walked back the remarks, suggesting his comments were taken “wildly out of context.”

The German region of Guetersloh in the northwest of the country was put under lockdown today as the number of coronavirus cases surged past 1,000 following an outbreak at a meatpacking plant. Guetersloh is home to about 360,000 residents and is the first area in Germany to go back into lockdown.

Russia jails Pussy Riot manager for 15 days for petty hooliganism

Anti-Kremlin activist Pyotr Verzilov poses for a photo before an interview with Reuters in Berlin, Sept. 28, 2018.

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Reinhard Krause/Reuters 

A Moscow court jailed Pyotr Verzilov, an anti-Kremlin activist and associate of the Pussy Riot punk group, for 15 days on Monday after finding him guilty of petty hooliganism for swearing in public. Kirill Koroteev, a lawyer and the head of the International Practice of Agora, the group that has taken up Verzilov’s case, spoke to The World’s host Marco Werman about what happened.

Discussion: What’s next in the fight against the coronavirus?

A man walks next to a graffiti depicting a cleaner wearing protective gear spraying viruses with the face of Brazil’s President Jair Bolsonaro amid the coronavirus outbreak, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, June 12, 2020. 

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Sergio Moraes/Reuters

The coronavirus pandemic has infected more than 9 million people globally and caused 440,000 deaths worldwide. With countries starting to reopen while we await vaccines and treatments, what can we expect next and how can we prepare and respond? As part of our series of conversations addressing the coronavirus crisis, The World’s Elana Gordon will be taking your questions while moderating a discussion with epidemiologist Caroline Buckee from Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health on Tuesday, June 23, at 12 p.m. EST.

Morning meme

Barcelona’s Gran Teatre del Liceu opera reopened its doors to potted plants Monday. Spanish conceptual artist Eugenio Ampudia had the idea to place the plants in the theater, inspired by his connection to nature during the pandemic. The plant-based reopening came a day after Spain’s three-month state of emergency ended.

Nursery plants are seen placed in people’s seats at Barcelona’s Gran Teatre del Liceu, June 22, 2020.

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Nacho Doce/Reuters

In case you missed itListen: Face masks and the coronavirus crisis

A supporter of US President Donald Trump wears a protective face mask among many other supporters without masks during a campaign rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma, June 20, 2020.

Credit:

Leah Millis/Reuters

The more we learn about the coronavirus, the more the evidence points to the importance of face coverings in limiting the virus’s spread. Still, if you’re confused about the what and the how of masks, you are not alone. And, Beijing had some strong words for Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau this morning: “Stop making irresponsible remarks.” Trudeau reiterated his belief that China’s decision to charge two Canadians with spying was retribution for the arrest of a Chinese tech executive. Also, temperatures above 100 degrees have been recorded in a small town in Eastern Siberia.

Don’t forget to subscribe to The World’s Latest Edition podcast using your favorite podcast player: RadioPublicApple PodcastsStitcherSoundcloudRSS.

Trump suspends entry of certain foreign workers despite business opposition

Trump suspends entry of certain foreign workers despite business opposition

US President Donald Trump stands at the podium during a campaign rally at the BOK Center in Tulsa, Oklahoma, June 20, 2020.

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US President Donald Trump on Monday issued a presidential proclamation that temporarily blocks foreign workers entering on H-1B, a move the White House said would help the coronavirus-battered economy, but which business groups strongly oppose.

The presidential proclamation temporarily suspends H-1B visas for skilled employees, and L visas, for managers and specialized workers being transferred within a company.

He also blocked those entering on H-2B seasonal worker visas, used by landscapers and other industries.

The visa suspension, which takes effect on Wednesday until the end of the year, will open up 525,000 jobs for US workers, a senior administration official said on a call with reporters.

The official, who did not explain how the administration arrived at that figure, said the move was geared at “getting Americans back to work as quickly as possible.”

But businesses including major tech companies like Amazon and Google, and the US Chamber of Commerce said the visa suspension would stifle the economic recovery after the damage done by the pandemic.

Critics of the measure say Trump is using the pandemic to achieve his longstanding goal to limit immigration. The proclamation’s immediate effects are likely to be limited, as US consulates around the world remain closed for most routine visa processing.

Related: 10 US immigration issues to watch in 2020

The proclamation exempts those already in the United States, as well as valid visa holders abroad, but they must have an official travel document that permits entry into the United States.

Immigration attorneys were working on Monday to determine what the order might mean for clients now out of the country.

The measure also exempts food supply chain workers and people whose entry is deemed in the national interest. The suspension will include work-authorized J visas for cultural exchange opportunities, including camp counselors and au pairs, as well as visas for the spouses of H-1B workers.

Trump has made a tough immigration stance a central pitch for his re-election in November, although the coronavirus, faltering economy and nationwide protests over police brutality have overshadowed that issue.

The president has faced pressure to restrict work visas from groups that seek lower levels of immigration, as well as some Republican lawmakers.

In a statement, BSA, the Software Alliance, whose members include Microsoft and Slack, urged the administration to “refrain from restricting employment of highly-skilled foreign professionals,” adding, “These restrictions will negatively impact the US economy,” and decrease job opportunities for Americans.

Doug Rand, co-founder of Boundless, a pro-migrant group that helps families navigate the US immigration system, said the fact that H-2A visas used to bring in foreign farmworkers were exempt signals that “big agriculture interests are the only stakeholder with any sway over immigration policy in this administration.”

H-2B visas, which were included in the suspension, have been used by Trump owned- or Trump-branded businesses, including his Mar-a-Lago club in Florida.

Many business groups were lobbying against a temporary visa ban before it was announced.

Sarah Pierce, a policy analyst with the Washington-based Migration Policy Institute, estimated that the new ruling would block 219,000 foreign workers through the rest of the year.

“This is introducing more chaos into an already chaotic situation for a lot of US companies,” she said.

“The administration is making the assumption that these companies did not already look at the US labor market, which most of them do before they get involved in a complicated process of trying to bring in foreign workers.”

Mitch Wexler, a managing partner at law firm Fragomen, said the order would hurt his social media and wireless communications clients and other tech companies.

Employers “wouldn’t pay a lot of money to file these applications and hire lawyers like me if they could hire an American for these positions,” he said.

Trump also renewed an April proclamation that blocks some foreigners from permanent residence in the United States, extending that measure until the end of the year.

The senior administration official said that proclamation freed up roughly 50,000 jobs for Americans, but did not provide details.

The visa suspension issued on Monday narrows an exemption for medical workers in Trump’s April ruling to include only people working on coronavirus research and care.

US Citizenship and Immigration Services said there were 15,269 petitions for H-1B visas in healthcare-related jobs across the United States in fiscal year 2019.

The Trump administration will make several other moves to tighten rules around temporary work visas.

The administration plans to rework the H-1B visa program so that the 85,000 visas available each year go to the highest-paid applicants, instead of the current lottery system, the senior administration official said.

It also plans to issue rules making it harder for companies to use the H-1B visa program to train foreign workers to perform the same job in another country, the official said.

Both moves would likely require regulatory changes.

The Trump administration is also taking steps to limit work permits for asylum-seekers, finalizing a regulation on Monday to remove a requirement to process such permits within 30 days.

A separate asylum measure set to be finalized on Friday would greatly limit asylum seekers’ access to work permits.

By Ted Hesson/Reuters

Russia jails Pussy Riot manager for 15 days for petty hooliganism

Russia jails Pussy Riot manager for 15 days for petty hooliganism

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Daniel Ofman

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Anti-Kremlin activist Pyotr Verzilov poses for a photo before an interview with Reuters in Berlin, Sept. 28, 2018.

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A Moscow court jailed Pyotr Verzilov, an anti-Kremlin activist and associate of the Pussy Riot punk group, for 15 days on Monday after finding him guilty of petty hooliganism for swearing in public.

Verzilov, the publisher of the private MediaZona news outlet, was taken in for questioning by police on Sunday over a political rally last summer and held him for hours. He was attacked by an unknown male assailant after he was released.

Both men were later detained by police and Verzilov was charged with swearing in public, Verzilov’s lawyer Leonid Solovyov was quoted by the RIA news agency as saying.

Writing on Twitter after his sentencing on Monday, Verzilov accused the police of staging the incident to provoke and jail him.

“The judge just sentenced me to 15 DAYS FOR SWEARING — but in actual fact, for a police provocation that included attacking me after being questioned for 13 hours in the Investigative Committee,” Verzilov wrote in his Tweet.

TASS news agency cited a police source as saying Verzilov had planned to stage a prank on Wednesday when Russia marks the defeat of Nazi Germany in World War II with a military parade on Red Square. Verzilov denied this in comments to the BBC’s Russian Service.

Verzilov was one of four Pussy Riot activists who ran onto the pitch wearing police uniforms during the soccer World Cup final in Moscow in 2018, a stunt they said aimed to draw attention to human rights abuses.

Kirill Koroteev, a lawyer and the head of the International Practice of Agora, the group that has taken up Verzilov’s case, spoke to The World’s host Marco Werman about what happened. 

Marco Werman: Kirill, before we get to the court case from earlier today, what is the timeline here? Just briefly explain what happened to Mr. Verzilov after he got arrested Sunday.

Kirill Koroteev: Police burst into his apartment. They broke the door. There he was arrested and taken to a police station where he was questioned for 13 hours approximately, without access to a lawyer, but then he was released. So he was walking away from the police station and noticed a person following him. And 10 minutes after his release, that person just attacked him, pushing him on the ground. That’s when the police arrived and arrested him for the fight. Now, it turned out that the person who pushed Mr. Verzilov had no injuries, and only Mr. Verzilov had injuries. So, the police charged him with cursing in public instead.

 

So, let me get the straight. After 13 hours of interrogation, Verzilov was followed from the station. He was beaten up and then rearrested?

Exactly.

So, what was the verdict today in court?

The court sentenced him to 15 days in prison and decided not to hear the policeman who charged him and not to hear the person who attacked him. The court believed the police-written report saying that Verzilov cursed in public and the court did not believe Verzilov who said he didn’t.

Why do you think this is happening right now to Pyotr Verzilov?

What is happening is quite usual for the activists but the timing of his precise arrest is not very clear. It was rumored that he was going to stage some sort of interruption at the military parade on June 24, or at the voting on the constitution on July 1. But today in court, Pyotr Verzilov denied that and said he had no such intention.

 

What does this arrest and this whole ordeal tell you about the mindset of state authorities in Russia?

Well, during last year’s Moscow protests and even previously, any major leaders would get arrested beforehand so that they spend the day of the protest in prison. It is quite a regular modus operandi for the Russian authorities. They just cannot operate otherwise than by breaching individual rights.

This interview has been lightly edited and condensed for clarity. Reuters contributed to this report. 

Discussion: What’s next in the fight against the coronavirus?

Discussion: What's next in the fight against the coronavirus?

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The World staff

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Amid global protests, Jamaicans confront their own problems with policing 

Amid global protests, Jamaicans confront their own problems with policing 

Jamaica shares the US’s history of colonialism and slavery, and now has one of the highest rates of fatal police shootings. Activists there are thinking about what the global moment of police accountability could mean for their country. 

By
Rupa Shenoy

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People hold posters as they take part in a demonstration against the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, at the Emancipation Park in Kingston, Jamaica, June 6, 2020.

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Earlier this month, Black Lives Matter protesters gathered outside the US Embassy in Kingston, Jamaica, as part of the worldwide George Floyd protests.

The country’s historic newspaper, the Jamaica Gleaner, recorded the chants: “Say her name! Susan Bogle! Say her name! Susan Bogle!”

Bogle was a disabled woman in Jamaica who was allegedly accidentally killed by officers in her home two days after Floyd’s death in the US.

Related: This African American in Ghana says making Juneteenth a federal holiday is a ‘small gesture.’ She urges police reform.

“There is still a sense where people feel that they don’t get social justice,” Prime Minister Andrew Holness said in an address to the nation.

“The government will ensure that nothing in these matters will be hidden, nothing will be swept under the carpet. And that the social and economic status of the victim does not determine the outcome of justice.”

Prime Minister Andrew Holness

“The government will ensure that nothing in these matters will be hidden, nothing will be swept under the carpet. And that the social and economic status of the victim does not determine the outcome of justice.” 

Those reassurances were necessary because there are long-standing problems with policing in Jamaica. Human rights groups have found there’s a culture of fear, with officers carrying out extrajudicial killings, tampering with evidence and intimidating witnesses.

“To say that the Jamaican police is corrupt is not something that I have to say, and say, ‘Oh, don’t say I said that,’ you know, that’s openly acknowledged,” said Diana Thorburn, director of research at the Caribbean Policy Research Institute.

Related: ‘We need to talk about racism,’ these Middle Easterners say 

She said that even though Jamaicans see the police as corrupt, they also believe the country needs law enforcement. Violent crime, pervasive in Jamaica, is fueled by, among other things, the country’s strategic location for smuggling drugs into the US. Just this month, two police officers were fatally shot by men with high-powered guns.

The incident horrified the public, Thorburn said, and reminded Jamaicans that in a society with one of the highest murder rates in the world, they need protection — even if it comes from a police force that’s had issues almost as long as it’s existed.

“Most analyses of the problem trace it back to the origins of the police force, which was as a colonial institution to keep down the slaves.”

Diana Thorburn, Caribbean Policy Research Institute

“Most analyses of the problem trace it back to the origins of the police force, which was as a colonial institution to keep down the slaves,” she said.

The British used colonial Jamaica as a center for slave trading in the West Indies. Even after the country became an independent member of the British commonwealth in 1962, the historical disregard for Black life continued, said University of Pennsylvania professor Deborah Thomas, who has written books about human rights in Jamaica.

“It’s a hard sort of conceptual reality for Americans to understand, African Americans in particular, that you could have anti-Black violence in a majority-black country,” Thomas said. “But it doesn’t go away because there’s a Black person in power, because, in fact, the societies were built on this.”

Related: US protests highlight ‘anti-black racism across the globe,’ says South African political analyst

After Jamaica’s independence, the US stepped in, eager to make sure that a country in its backyard was secure during the Cold War. Then, during the war on drugs, Thomas said the US helped fund the militarization of Jamaica’s police. That drew international attention in May 2010, when the US pressured Jamaica to extradite the head of a gang who controlled a community called Tivoli Gardens, in Kingston.

Jamaica declared a state of emergency, and during the manhunt, police killed more than 70 people. Thomas directed a documentary about what happened at Tivoli and was surprised that the killings there weren’t a subject of conversation in Jamaica after Floyd’s death.

“The George Floyd stuff happens and people were going back and forth on social media about police violence in Jamaica, there wasn’t really a robust conversation about Tivoli and/or a recognition that, in fact, this is what we’re talking about — and this is the 10th anniversary exactly of this.”

Deborah Thomas, University of Pennsylvania professor

“The George Floyd stuff happens and people were going back and forth on social media about police violence in Jamaica, there wasn’t really a robust conversation about Tivoli and/or a recognition that, in fact, this is what we’re talking about — and this is the 10th anniversary exactly of this,” Thomas said.

Instead, since Floyd’s and Bogle’s deaths, Holness has declared another state of emergency in response to violent crime, granting police powers to stop, search and detain residents without a warrant in certain areas.

Related: Video of police beating Indigenous chief fuels ongoing anti-racism protests in Canada

“These areas, if left unchecked, have shown historically that they can spiral to chaotic ends, even having national disruptive impact,” he said.

Meanwhile, there are fewer checks on police power. Jamaica’s Independent Commission of Investigations, which once arrested and prosecuted officers, no longer has that ability.

Rodje Malcolm, director of Jamaicans for Justice, said in the name of fighting crime, Jamaicans have given up on human rights for some people.

“But those people are viewed as expendable,” Malcolm said. “Those people are viewed as deserving it because they are from the communities where there is high crime.”

But in this global moment, sparked by Floyd’s death, Malcolm said Jamaicans might be able to consider other ways of policing that prioritize peace.

“It’s possible a little bit more now because many Jamaicans can see in themselves as those Black people in the United States,” he said, “and it’s simply about turning that gaze inwards to understand … the ways that we perpetuate various similar systems and are OK with it.”

Paulinho Paiakan is remembered as a hero to Indigenous Brazilians

Paulinho Paiakan is remembered as a hero to Indigenous Brazilians

As Brazil tops 1 million confirmed cases of the coronavirus, the country’s Indigenous peoples mourn the death of a historic leader.

By
Michael Fox

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Indigenous leader Paulinho Paiakan takes part in an Occupy Funai protest that will shut down Funai offices throughout Brazil in Brasilia, July 13, 2016.

Credit:

Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters 

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Kayapó Bepkororoti, better known as Paulinho Paiakan, was a hero to Indigenous Brazilians across the country, not just those of his own Kayapó people.

Paiakan was seen as one of the first Kayapó to recognize the power of the media and of learning Portuguese, the language of Brazil’s majority. He also understood the importance of unifying Brazil’s Indigenous people.

Related: Police beating of Indigenous chief fuels Canadian anti-racism protests

“The only thing, brothers and sisters, is unity,” he said in a recent interview from an Indigenous gathering, which was posted after his death. “We all must unite in order to fight. That is the only way we will overcome any government.”

 Partiu nesta manhã o grande líder Kayapó Bepkororoti, mais conhecido como Paulinho Payakan.

Partiu nesta manhã o grande líder Kayapó Bepkororoti, mais conhecido como Paulinho Payakan. Mais uma vida levada pela Covid-19! Para os povos indígenas, em especial os Kayapó, mais uma enciclopédia de conhecimento tradicional que se vai! Lembramos sua luta e trajetória com uma mensagem de união, gravada em janeiro de 2020, quando já reforçava a importância de somar esforços para combater os ataques sistemáticos que os povos indígenas vem sofrendo. O avanço da pandemia já vitimou 287 parentes e segue em ritmo acelerado nas aldeias e territórios indígenas. Confira a homenagem da @coiabamazonia para o líder Paulinho Payakan. #luto #vidasindígenasimportam #povosindigenas #quarentenaindigena

Posted by Mídia NINJA on Wednesday, June 17, 2020

Last week, he died from the coronavirus, and while his legacy lives on, some say his death is a sign of the times for Indigenous peoples across Brazil, as COVID-19 increasingly spreads into their territories.

“Paiakan will be missed,” said Adriano Jerozolimski from the Protected Forest Association, which represents roughly 30 Kayapó communities in southern Pará state.

“It’s difficult to predict the real impact that this new illness is going to have on the Kayapó and Indigenous peoples, in general. But it will be enormous. It’s already a catastrophe.”

Adriano Jerozolimski, Protected Forest Association

“It’s difficult to predict the real impact that this new illness is going to have on the Kayapó and Indigenous peoples, in general. But it will be enormous. It’s already a catastrophe.”

So far, 332 Indigenous people have died from the coronavirus, and 7,208 people are infected across 110 tribes, according to the Association of Indigenous Peoples in Brazil (APIB), a leading Indigenous organization.

Amid the pandemic, Indigenous peoples across Brazil are also facing increasingly racist and hostile attitudes from local officials and businesses. The mayor of Pau D’Arco, in the Amazonian state of Pará, banned Kayapó tribal members from the city, saying they are high-risk for infection.

“This is prejudice, discrimination — or racism,” said local Indigenous leader Takwyry Kayapó.

Related: Black Lives Matter protests renew parallel debates in Brazil, Colombia

Far to the south, 40 Kaingang tribal members living on the Serrinha Indigenous Territory were fired from their jobs at a local meatpacking plant run by JBS, the world’s largest meat-processing company, on the grounds that they, too, were high-risk for infection. A local Kaingang lawyer is fighting the mass firing.

Meanwhile, deaths continue to climb, and the number of Indigenous people infected with COVID-19 has doubled in just a week.

“We are losing our leaders. We are losing our libraries. That’s the feeling that we have about losing many of these community elders. That the communities are losing their knowledge and history.”

Sandro Luckmann, Missionary Council for Indigenous People, COMIN

“We are losing our leaders,” said Sandro Luckmann, the director of the Missionary Council for Indigenous People, COMIN

“We are losing our libraries. That’s the feeling that we have about losing many of these community elders. That the communities are losing their knowledge and history.”

Paiakan, who was about 65 years old, is survived by his wife and their three girls. There’s been an outpouring all over social media in Brazil honoring the late Indigenous leader.

Related: Brazil’s government hid coronavirus stats. That’s a problem.

In one 36-second video, roughly a dozen members of the Kaingang tribe, in southern Brazil, dance in face masks and feathered headdresses. 

pic.twitter.com/oeyLhQztS2

— APIB oficial (@ApibOficial) June 18, 2020

“Today is a very sad day. A day of mourning for the Indigenous peoples of Brazil,” says a man in an accompanying video clip. “We are here to say that we will survive the pandemic and try to live life as Paiakan did, in defense of the environment and fighting for the Indigenous cause.”

O legado da luta de Bepkororoti, Paulinho Paiakan, está enraizado na vida dos povos indígenas de todas as regiões do Brasil. O povo Kaingang do Sul do país fez uma linda homenagem pela passagem de Paulinho. #luto pic.twitter.com/aV9Sj0YaZR

— APIB oficial (@ApibOficial) June 18, 2020

Another, produced by the Indigenous filmmaker Kamikia Kisedje, features grainy news footage from 1989. Representatives of 24 different Brazilian Indigenous tribes and environmentalists march chanting into a stadium in the Amazon city of Altamira to fight government plans to build hydroelectric dams on their land.

Homenagem do fotógrafo e cineasta ambiental indígena @kamikiakisedje para Paulinho Paiakan, que junto com seu tio, Cacique Raoni, liderou a mobilização de enfrentamento da hidrelétrica de Kararaô (primeiro nome dado para o projeto da usina que hoje é Belo Monte), em 1989. #luto pic.twitter.com/Ira7s369ZW

— APIB oficial (@ApibOficial) June 18, 2020

Paiakan, the organizer, tells a government representative that dams would destroy their people. The crowd cheers.

Paiakan, who began to defend Indigenous land under Brazil’s military dictatorship in the 1970s, was instrumental in the demarcation of tribal territory and ensuring that Indigenous rights were enshrined in Brazil’s 1988 Constitution.

“Paiaka was one of the activists who was on the frontlines of making sure that clauses that guarantee Indigenous rights today are in the constitution.”

Glenn Shepard, an anthropologist and filmmaker who has lived and worked in the Amazon for decades

“Paiaka was one of the activists who was on the frontlines of making sure that clauses that guarantee Indigenous rights today are in the constitution,” said Glenn Shepard, an anthropologist and filmmaker who has lived and worked in the Amazon for decades.

Related: Women leaders eschew ‘macho-man’ politics in COVID-19 response

“He was in the room during the creation and signing of the constitution and he was translating. There was this huge Kayapó commission.” 

Historic alliance of forest peoples at Altamira in 1989 in opposition to the Belo Monte dam, with Paulino Payakan in a leading role via @felipedjeguaka @socioambiental https://t.co/G4dtftNDYU

— Glenn H. Shepard (@TweetTropiques) June 19, 2020

Paiakan and his uncle, Chief Raoni Metuktire became the faces of the international movement to defend the Amazon against deforestation, mining and development. With the help of rock star Sting and an international campaign, they successfully blocked the development of the Belo Monte Dam on the Xingu River for years before a modified project was eventually built over the last decade.

But his international image was tarnished in 1992 when a student accused him of rape. The news broke on the cover of the conservative magazine Veja the very week that the world’s environmental leaders were amassed in Rio de Janeiro for the historic Earth Summit.

The allegations were thrown out of court two years later. But a retrial in 1998 led to the conviction of both Paiakan and his wife. They were sentenced to six, and four years in jail, respectively, which they partially served under house arrest on their Indigenous territory.

Paiakan never regained his previous international rock star status. For his allies, the case was a tool to silence Paiakan and his prominent environmental activism.

“In order to push back against the demarcation of Indigenous lands and in order to be able to deforest and extract the resources from the land, and everything that Paulinho was against, they politically shot him — the greatest environmental icon on the planet at that time,” said Felipe Milanez, a humanities professor at the Federal University of Bahia, who knew Paiakan and his family well, having worked at Brazil’s National Indian Foundation.

De toda a imprensa que massacrou Paiakan e os Kayapo, sempre ao lado dos fazendeiros e mineradoras, que inclui OGlobo, Estadão, JB, QuantoÉ, Veja, etc, a @folha foi a única que trouxe dois obituários RACISTAS por Fabiano Maisonnave e Sérgio Dávila requentando mentiras antigas.

— Felipe Milanez (@felipedjeguaka) June 21, 2020

 

Farmers become social media stars on Chinese TikTok

Farmers become social media stars on Chinese TikTok

Part of the appeal for Chinese urbanites is a peek into life in the countryside. But the promise of a bargain is also a draw.

By
Rebecca Kanthor

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A man holding a phone walks past a sign of Chinese company ByteDance’s app TikTok, known locally as Douyin, at the International Artificial Products Expo in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, China, Oct. 18, 2019. 

Credit:

Reuters 

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Just like in the US, TikTok in China is full of funny videos, odd challenges and its own brand of stars. Farmers are some of the most unlikely social media stars here, and they’re using their fame to sell their produce.

“It’s almost a more modern take on the old TV shopping.”

Mark Tanner, founder of China Skinny

“It’s almost a more modern take on the old TV shopping,” said Mark Tanner, the founder of China Skinny, a marketing research agency based in Shanghai.

Related: Racism against African Americans in China escalates amid coronavirus

In one video on TikTok, a farmer who goes by the name Northern Big Sis sits in her greenhouse and takes giant bites of the raw vegetables she grows on her farm. All of her videos are variations on this theme: She chomps her way through onions, garlic and other vegetables. The videos are strangely addictive. Viewers keep swiping just to find out what vegetables she’ll eat next.

A button above the video lets viewers buy the produce she’s marketing without even leaving the TikTok app, and in record time, boxes of fruit and vegetables are delivered straight to your doorstep.

Livestreaming is big business in China, and with everyone stuck at home earlier this year because of the coronavirus pandemic, companies large and small had a captive audience. Tanner said there was a 730% rise in brand livestreaming in February alone.

“It was already rising quite quickly; all of a sudden, with COVID [-19], it has just gone gangbusters,” he said.

He’s been surprised at how much of a hit the farmers have been. Millions of viewers tune in to watch them sell their produce.

“So, you’re getting a large number of these farmers that have all of a sudden become minicelebrities.”

Mark Tanner, founder of China Skinny

“So, you’re getting a large number of these farmers that have all of a sudden become minicelebrities.”

Related: Millennials in China reexamine their spending habits as economy recovers

Part of the appeal for Chinese urbanites is a peek into life in the countryside. But the promise of a bargain is also a draw.

“Chinese consumers, like any consumers, they love a deal. So, they’re getting this deal, and they’re getting entertained at the same time; so, it’s been incredibly popular.”

Some farmers are getting creative in how they hawk their wares.

One group of young farmers has a captive audience for their farming fashion shows on TikTok and Kuaishou, another livestreaming app. In each video, the Four Country Treasures, as they are known, strut down a red carpet laid out in the middle of a field in rural Guangxi Province, clothed in nothing but the food they sell. Garlic strands, bamboo leaves, handmade noodles, strings of chives and hot peppers — make for some silly and mouthwatering outfits. Accompanied by a laugh track and sound effects, the videos are fun to watch, and the products they’re selling are clickable — one day it’s homemade pickled turnips, the next day, fresh mangoes.

This new sales approach has helped a lot of farmers hit hard by the COVID-19 lockdown. That includes Yang Qin Feng who runs the 16-acre Mi Le family farm on the outskirts of Shanghai. His first attempt at livestreaming included a cooking demonstration on a makeshift stove in the middle of a field.

Yang says he wants to teach shoppers about where their food comes from.

“Livestreaming is a little bit like selling at the farmers’ market. Shoppers can communicate with us and see how we harvest, they can ask questions and we can answer. That way, the customers can see for themselves and they’re more likely to buy.”

Yang Qin Feng, Mi Le family farm

“Livestreaming is a little bit like selling at the farmers’ market,” he said. “Shoppers can communicate with us and see how we harvest, they can ask questions and we can answer. That way, the customers can see for themselves and they’re more likely to buy.”

Related: China sends new message about centuries-old chopstick tradition

Yang’s broadcast worked on Rong Wei, a shopper who lives in the center of Shanghai. She was fascinated to learn how Manchurian wild rice, known as jiaobai, actually grows and she wound up buying some — along with eggs and chicken to give to her friends.

“Watching him explain his farming process made us want to eat the crops,” she said. “The jiaobai looked delicious. There was a bit of educational value, too.”

So, will growers around the world take up livestreaming like Chinese farmers have? Tanner thinks their success can’t be easily replicated.

Related: Canadian activists say they’re being targeted by China

“Chinese people are much more engaged with digital and particularly e-commerce, and they adopt new technologies faster than anyone, and they also have incredibly well-integrated payment systems,” he said.

It’s unlikely this trend will catch on in the West with quite the same speed. But in China, farmers have already become influencers. 

US-Mexico border wall threatens sacred Native lands

US-Mexico border wall threatens sacred Native lands

Writer
Adam Wernick

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Organ Pipe Cactus National Park in Arizona is the only area where Organ Pipe Cactus grows wild. The Tohono O’odham Nation is one of the many tribes which considers this land sacred. The construction of the border wall involves heavy machinery that has already damaged wildlife and cacti in the Arizona desert.

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Courtesy of the National Park Service

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The Trump administration’s rush to complete sections of a wall along the US-Mexico border before the November election is threatening to damage and restrict access to sacred and historic Native American sites in the region.

The border wall was a key promise of President Donald Trump’s election campaign, and in his bid to keep that promise, dozens of environmental laws, from the Endangered Species Act to the Clean Air Act, were suspended to fast-track construction.

The Tohono O’odham Nation says the suspension of certain laws to speed wall construction has allowed damage to sacred ancestral lands, including burial grounds.

The Tohono O’odham Nation, which has been confined to a fraction of the lands it once held in the desert Southwest, says the suspension of these laws has allowed damage to sacred ancestral lands, including burial grounds. And they fear more damage is to come.

RelatedUS border fence skirts environmental review

Rafael Carranza, a journalist for the Arizona Republic and USA Today who has reported on this issue, visited several of the sites in question, some of which are located in Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument and Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge in southwestern Arizona.

“These are protected lands,” Carranza says. “It’s desert wilderness, but they contain signs of the early tribal life that the O’odham people carried out for centuries and centuries.”

There are numerous archaeological, historical and cultural sites throughout the Arizona desert that are important to the Tohono O’odham Nation, Carranza explains, including a ceremonial site called Las Playas and an unnamed burial site located right next to the border wall.

Last October, as contractors were preparing to build a section of wall in Organ Pipe, they came across what they thought were bone fragments. After testing, they determined that they were, in fact, human remains. Work was stopped, the government recovered the fragments and it plans to give them to the Tohono O’odham Nation, but the tribe has been “very concerned that this is just one reported instance [and] that there could be many more instances where the contractors or the construction workers don’t know what to look for…and their heritage will be irreparably damaged,” Carranza says.

The Tohono O’odham people have lived in these areas for centuries, many, many years before the United States or Mexico existed, Carranza explains.

“A big part of their culture involved traveling the desert…, following the water, following the resources of the land,” he says. “It’s a very parched area, so it was a constant struggle, looking for food and water. They would travel vast territories, stretching from the Colorado River on the Arizona-California state line, all the way to the San Pedro river in the eastern part of Arizona, as far north as Phoenix [and] as far south as the state of Sonora [in Mexico].”

RelatedBuild the wall across the San Pedro River? Many say no.

In 1917, the US government created the main reservation for the Tohono O’odham near the US-Mexico border. But once the borders were instituted, Carranza says, the Nation was split between the two countries.

Unlike the United States, Mexico did not create a reservation or designate protected lands exclusively for the tribe. For these members of the Tohono O’odham, accessing historical sites and pilgrimage routes was difficult. Now, similar difficulties are arising on the US side because of all the border security mechanisms the Trump administration has put in place, Carranza says.

The administration has pushed to erect a new type of barrier along the entire length of the US-Mexico border, but because the Tohono O’odham Nation enjoys tribal sovereignty and controls the reservation, they have been able to stop the government from building these 30-foot tall bollards within the reservation itself, Carranza says. Instead, the US government has focused its work on protected federal lands, where it’s relatively easy to issue waivers on laws that in the past provided some measure of protection from damage and destruction.

Because wall construction has proceeded so rapidly, Native tribes say they are not being taken into account, that their voices are not being heard and their concerns are not being addressed.

Because construction has proceeded so rapidly, Carranza says, the tribes say they are “just not being taken into account, that their voices are not being heard and their concerns are not being addressed when it comes to the erection of these new, taller barriers” in places along the border that already had protections in place.

“The Trump administration has been pushing [for these] 30-foot-tall bollards that tower above anything else that you would see in these parts of the border and in the desert,” Carranza says.

The US government has hired environmental and cultural monitors who work on site in case workers come across endangered species or cultural artifacts, but only one person monitors the entire swath of construction in the desert region where the project is now ongoing, Carranza says.

RelatedTrump’s wall will harm wildlife along the US southern border, say environmental experts

Despite all of this, Carranza sees little indication that the government will alter its plans in any significant way. They want to have all the barriers in the region, and throughout Arizona, finished close to the November election, “so they’re moving full speed ahead,” he says.

“Environmentalists and community groups are hoping the courts will be able to step in through one of the several lawsuits that they filed,” Carranza notes. “They’re hoping that federal judges will either issue an injunction barring the government from any additional construction or any other type of measures that will stop the construction at the moment. But to date, we haven’t seen any of that.”

This article is based on an interview by Bobby Bascomb that aired on Living on Earth from PRX.

China rebukes US envoy for photo stunt at nuclear talks with Russia

China rebukes US envoy for photo stunt at nuclear talks with Russia

US special envoy Marshall Billingslea and his delegation arrive for a meeting with Russian deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov in Vienna, Austria, June 22, 2020.

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Leonhard Foeger/Reuters

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US and Russian officials met in Vienna on Monday to discuss to nuclear arms control. But the US envoy taunted China for its absence, earning a rebuke from Beijing for posting a picture of empty seats with Chinese flags

US President Donald Trump has sought to include Beijing in talks to replace the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START), the flagship nuclear arms treaty between the United States and Russia, which expires in February. China, a nuclear power with an arsenal a fraction the size of those of the Cold War-era superpowers, has repeatedly declined.

“China is a no-show,” US Special Presidential Envoy for Arms Control Marshall Billingslea said on Twitter around the time he arrived for the talks in a palace adjoining Austria’s Foreign Ministry.

“Beijing still hiding behind #GreatWallofSecrecy on its crash nuclear build-up, and so many other things. We will proceed with #Russia, notwithstanding,” he added. His post included a picture of a Chinese flags at empty seats around the negotiating table.

Vienna talks about to start. China is a no-show. Beijing still hiding behind #GreatWallofSecrecy on its crash nuclear build-up, and so many other things. We will proceed with #Russia, notwithstanding. pic.twitter.com/EjDxXNmblv

— Ambassador Marshall S. Billingslea (@USArmsControl) June 22, 2020

The director general of the arms control department at China’s Foreign Ministry, Fu Cong, responded:  “What an odd scene! Displaying Chinese National Flags on a negotiating table without China’s consent! Good luck on the extension of the New START! Wonder how LOW you can go?”

China’s diplomatic mission in Vienna retweeted Billingslea’s photo with the caption “US performance art?”.

Russia, for its part, posted pictures of the talks after they started, with no Chinese flags. Austria’s Foreign Ministry, which hosted the talks, declined to comment.

The talks in Vienna are on a possible replacement for the 2010 New START, which caps US and Russian deployed strategic nuclear weapons warheads at 1,550 each. That replaced the original Cold War-era START treaty signed in 1991 six months before the Soviet Union collapsed.

China has around 300 warheads in total, roughly the same as France, and many times less than the thousands possessed by Washington and Moscow, according to the Stockholm International Peace Institute.

Trump, who has clashed with China on a range of issues, has repeatedly called for Beijing to join talks on a replacement for New START. China has rejected those calls.

Billingslea and his Russian interlocutor, Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov, both said little about the substance of the talks on their arrival.

“We’ll see,” Billingslea told Reuters when asked what he expected to come of the talks as he arrived. Ryabkov told reporters: “Let’s see, let’s see. We are always very hopeful.”

by Francois Murphy/Reuters

The global implications of Geoffrey Berman firing; US and Russia start nuclear weapons talks; US targets Assad govt and backers with sanctions

The global implications of Geoffrey Berman firing; US and Russia start nuclear weapons talks; US targets Assad govt and backers with sanctions

By
The World staff

US Attorney for the Southern District Geoffrey Berman attends a news conference on the indictment of Lev Parnas, Igor Fruman, David Correia, and Andrey Kukushnin for various charges related to violations of US federal election laws in New York City, Oct. 10, 2019.

Credit:

Andrew Kelly/Reuters

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Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

Shares in Turkish state lender Halkbank surged 8% today after US federal chief prosecutor Geoffrey Berman was forced to step down over the weekend. Berman oversaw an indictment against the bank which alleges the company used money service businesses and front companies to evade US sanctions on Iran. John Bolton, the former national security adviser, has claimed in his tell-all book set for release tomorrow, that President Donald Trump promised Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan that he would intervene in the case.

The firing of Berman, the US attorney for the influential office of the Southern District of New York, was the latest in a series of moves by Attorney General William Barr that critics say undermines the independence of the Justice Department over political benefits for Trump.

Berman’s office has spent years engaging cases that take on figures in Trump’s orbit and had been investigating Rudy Giuliani, Trump’s private lawyer and a central person in the president’s interest in Ukraine and subsequent impeachment.

What The World is following

Wirecard, the former German technology darling, said on Monday that $2.1 billion is missing from its accounts and was likely never there. News of Wirecard’s accounting problems rattled Germany’s financial industry. Wirecard is a payments processor firm for companies including Visa and Mastercard, and it is now looking at the sale or closure of parts of its business.

Representatives from the US and Russia started nuclear weapons talks today in Vienna. Envoys for the countries haven’t said much ahead of the meetings, but the talks may include negotiations over replacing the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START), which expires in February. The Trump administration had repeatedly asked China to take part but Beijing refused.

And Verkhoyansk, Russia, a town north of the Arctic Circle in Siberia, may have recorded a new record heat temperature of 100.4 degrees over the weekend. If verified, the temperature would be the northernmost 100-degree reading ever observed.

Bolton allegations on Trump ‘as damaging as any in modern American history,’ says Nicholas Burns

Then-National Security Adviser John Bolton listens as US President Donald Trump holds a Cabinet meeting at the White House in Washington, DC, on April 9, 2018.

Credit:

Kevin Lamarque/File Photo/Reuters

Nicholas Burns, a former career foreign service officer, worked with the former Trump White House national security adviser, John Bolton. Burns spoke to The World’s host Marco Werman about the most disturbing allegations in Bolton’s book, which comes out Tuesday.

US targets Assad govt and backers with toughest sanctions yet against Syria

A woman walks past a poster depicting Syria’s President Bashar al-Assad in Damascus, Syria, March 5, 2020.

Credit:

Yamam Al Shaar/Reuters 

The aim is to prompt the Syrian president to negotiate an end to the war that has lasted almost a decade.

Morning meme

K-pop fans claim that through the social platform TikTok, they were responsible for the rows and rows of empty seats at Trump’s rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma, over the weekend. 

A supporter of President Donald Trump shoots a video with his  phone from the sparsely filled upper decks at the BOK Center in Tulsa, Oklahoma, June 20, 2020.

Credit:

Leah Millis/File Photo

In case you missed itListen: Celebrating Juneteenth amid global outrage over systemic racism

A child takes part in a rally as people march down Central Park West during events to mark Juneteenth amid nationwide protests against racial inequality, New York City, New York, June 19, 2020.

Credit:

Andrew Kelly/Reuters

Today is the Juneteenth holiday celebrating the emancipation of African Americans from slavery. The World hears from an African American woman who moved to Ghana decades ago to escape racism in the US. Also, Former US ambassador Nick Burns, who knows former National Security Adviser John Bolton from his time in government, weighs in on the veracity of some of the claims in Bolton’s forthcoming book. And, one-on-one concerts are replacing full orchestral shows in Stuttgart, Germany.

Don’t forget to subscribe to The World’s Latest Edition podcast using your favorite podcast player: RadioPublicApple PodcastsStitcherSoundcloudRSS.

This African American in Ghana says making Juneteenth a federal holiday is a ‘small gesture.’ She urges police reform.

This African American in Ghana says making Juneteenth a federal holiday is a ‘small gesture.’ She urges police reform.

By
The World staff

Producer
Carol Hills

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This year’s Juneteenth celebration in Ghana. Mona Boyd, who is African American and lives in Ghana, says the Juneteenth celebration in Accra has grown over the years. 

Credit:

Courtesy of Mona Boyd

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The news that slavery had ended reached Texas on June 19, 1865 — two years after the Emancipation Proclamation was issued.

Annual celebrations and events mark the end of slavery, but this year there’s renewed focus on the holiday amid recent protests pushing for racial equality and systemic change in the US and around the world.

Even corporate America is getting on board — companies like Twitter and Spotify are offering employees paid holidays on Friday. And there’s currently an effort to make Juneteenth a federal holiday.

Mona Boyd, an African American, celebrates Juneteenth in Ghana, where she’s lived for the past 30 years. She moved there from the US in the 1990s.

Boyd talked with The World from Accra, after returning from a  Juneteenth celebration, to explain how the day is celebrated in Ghana and the changes she’d like to see in the US.

“When I came to Ghana, I found a community of African Americans already celebrating this holiday. So, I joined them to celebrate it,” Boyd said. “And since that time, many people have joined us, many Ghanaians, in celebrating the holiday. So, I would say there’s a good knowledge of it. It’s not a holiday that people celebrate when you go upcountry. But down here in Accra, which has people from everywhere, it’s celebrated.”

Related: A professor with Ghanaian roots unearths a slave castle’s history — and her own

Marco Werman: I know from your own story, Mona, that you left the US because you did not think it was a good place to raise your son. How does that affect how you think about Juneteenth?

Mona Boyd: Juneteenth is a holiday that I’m much more connected to than July 4. July 4 was always just a holiday, a free day. But Juneteenth has a lot of significance because it actually means something to me. It was the day that my ancestors learned that they were no longer slaves, that they were now free.

This year, of course, Juneteenth comes in the midst of some major introspection and anger about the deaths of black people at the hands of police in this country. What is it like to observe from Ghana, the protests and the focus on police violence against African Americans right now?

Well, I have kind of mixed feelings because we have been there before. I’m not sure that much will change when it’s all over. You know, I grew up in the rural south under Jim Crow. So, you know, I know racism. I lived in an all-black world because of racism until I went to college. So, I have really mixed feelings about what it will all come to. I think that we need to have some new strategies.

Like what? What would you add?

If you look at American society, the country, everything is based on economics and the kind of capitalistic system that we have. Someone has got to be, from my perspective, someone has got to be at the bottom or else it may not work as well. And I think that what we need to do as black people is try to develop an economic strategy that will lift us from that bottom, which will then give us more power and more control over our lives and over how we are treated in the society.

You know, I’m not a big fan of integration, to be honest with you. I grew up in an all-black town and 50% of the people were self-employed. My father’s father bought his farm. He had been out of slavery maybe 20, 25 years. And then he and his son kept adding onto the land until it got up to around 500 acres. So, we were quite independent. We weren’t marginalized, and we didn’t really have to worry about people respecting us.

I understand your emphasis on creating wealth, but isn’t integration key, though, to eliminating otherness? Like to get people comfortable with the fact that we are all humans?

You know, we all know that. So, why do we have to tell you that? I didn’t feel this way until I left America. Because I had a chance to live in a place where race was not an issue. So, for almost 30 years, I haven’t really in my personal life had to deal with race. So, I was able to step back. Some things are about race. Some things are not about race. And I think if black people don’t do everything through the lens of race, then I think it would be much easier for us to deal with some of these social inequities in our society.

You know, every white person in America, from my perspective, is part of the problem. They know racism is systemic in every arena of America and they benefit from it. I’m not sure people are really willing to give it up. So, this is why I think black people need to start thinking about it differently. I mean, we shouldn’t have to tell people our lives matter. Because for many people, our lives don’t matter to them. And I think that we should decide our lives matter. And this is what we’re going to do to protect our lives on a daily basis. But I think one of the strategies that we have not gone near is looking at what we can do economically because we have a lot of money. We have a lot of money. And we really need to look at how that money is employed in America.

You raised something a moment ago that I want to ask you about — the idea that capitalism needs somebody on the bottom. How do you change that in a world that is driven by profit?

I’m not sure that you change it. I think that you concentrate on how you lessen its impact on you. I don’t see America changing its economic system at all. But, you know, other countries have dealt with this issue. Scandinavian countries tax their people at a 45% rate. So, everybody can have health care, education and enough food, a place to stay. It’s just the American value system, which is solely built on capitalism and nothing else matters.

And it’s not just black people that are marginalized by this capitalism. There are so many poor white people that are marginalized as well. So, getting into the heart and mind, especially the heart of people, of white people, they’re going to have to get into their own hearts because black people are never going to be able to turn that around. It’s been going on since black people have been in America. So, it’s up to white people to get into their own heart and do the right thing.

You said earlier, Mona, how much more Juneteenth means to you than July 4. There is a movement undertaken by a Republican lawmaker from Texas to make it a federal holiday. What do you think about that? I mean, it’s symbolic, is it important to have that?

Well, you know, we have been celebrating Juneteenth probably since slavery on our own without it being a holiday. They can make it a holiday. Personally, it doesn’t matter to me because I’m interested in a much bigger picture than a holiday in terms of change in America. I mean, pass the law that prevents chokeholds. Get rid of the law where cops will have immunity no matter what they do and how they do it. Those are the things that matter to me.

I can continue to celebrate Juneteenth, as I have been, you know, since I started. We cannot think that these little gestures actually are going to give us the results that we need to have happen. They won’t. We’ll just have another holiday.

 

This interview has been condensed and edited.

Nicholas Burns: Bolton allegations on Trump ‘as damaging as any in modern American history’

Nicholas Burns: Bolton allegations on Trump 'as damaging as any in modern American history'

By
The World staff

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Then-National Security Adviser John Bolton listens as US President Donald Trump holds a Cabinet meeting at the White House in Washington, DC, on April 9, 2018.

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US targets Assad govt and backers with toughest sanctions yet against Syria

US targets Assad govt and backers with toughest sanctions yet against Syria

The aim is to prompt the Syrian president to negotiate an end to the war that has lasted almost a decade.

By
Shirin Jaafari

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A woman walks past a poster depicting Syria’s President Bashar al-Assad in Damascus, Syria, March 5, 2020.

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The US State Department announced this week some of its toughest sanctions yet against Syria.

The sanctions are named “Caesar,” the code name for a former Syrian military officer who smuggled roughly 50,000 images and documents out of Syria’s prisons. The gruesome photos showed emaciated bodies of those detainees — men, women, even children.

“Today, we begin a sustained campaign of sanctions against the Assad regime under the Caesar Act. The individuals and entities targeted today have played a key role in obstructing a peaceful, political solution to the conflict.”

Morgan Ortagus, US State Department, spokesperson

“Today, we begin a sustained campaign of sanctions against the Assad regime under the Caesar Act,” spokeswoman Morgan Ortagus said Wednesday. “The individuals and entities targeted today have played a key role in obstructing a peaceful, political solution to the conflict.”

Related: Syria’s first family is caught in a feud 

The images sparked outrage and set off a yearslong effort to introduce additional sanctions on the Syrian leader and his inner circle. President Donald Trump signed the ensuing Caesar Syria Civilian Protection Act into law this past December.

“The sanctions confirm the direction that the State Department is taking,” explained Rime Allaf, a Syrian writer and commentator.

She said American officials have targeted 39 people or entities with ties to the Syrian government.

“Any company, any government, any entity around the world is going to be sanctioned if they deal with the Syrian regime elite who the State Department believes are responsible for committing these atrocities.”

Rime Allaf, Syrian writer and commentator

“Any company, any government, any entity around the world is going to be sanctioned if they deal with the Syrian regime elite who the State Department believes are responsible for committing these atrocities,” Allaf said.

Also on the list, for the first time, is Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s wife, Asma al-Assad.

A State Department press statement said she has been designated because “she has become one of Syria’s most notorious war profiteers.”

Related: Remembering Egyptian LGBTQ activist Sarah Hegazi

Born in the United Kingdom, Asma al-Assad Akhras worked as an investment banker in London until 2000, when she married Bashar al-Assad and moved to Syria.

The new sanctions restrict the first lady’s financial dealings, says Ibrahim Olabi, a Syrian lawyer in the UK.

“So, a lot of third parties would now hesitate to engage with Asma because they could face penalty for dealing with sanctioned individuals,” Olabi said.

The new sanctions take effect at an already difficult time for Syrians. The country’s economy has been hit hard by the war and the coronavirus.

One woman in Damascus told The World that she has stopped buying pricier food items like meat. She only buys the essentials now. The woman didn’t want to be identified because she worried she might lose her job for speaking to foreign media.

“Everything is so much more expensive these days. We feel insecure so we are not sure next month or the month later what we’re going to face.”

Woman in Damascus who asked to remain unnamed

“Everything is so much more expensive these days,” she said. “We feel insecure so we are not sure next month or the month later what we’re going to face.”

Related: Afghans in shock after attacks on a maternity hospital and a funeral

Lately, she said, she has noticed longer lines at the market for subsidized goods like rice and sugar.

“We are considering everything else as [a] luxury,” she said.

And with the new US sanctions, she expects the economy to get worse.

“Although we know that the effects won’t be seen suddenly in a few days, we are expecting that the upcoming months would be harder and harder,” she said.

There are already frustrations with the state of the economy. Last weekend, Syrians came out to protest — even in areas usually supportive of the president.

Critics of the Caesar Act say sanctions will only hurt the people.

Related: Syrian officials on trial for war crimes in Germany

“I would be lying if I said there won’t be any impact on regular, average Syrian civilians.”

Jomana Qaddour,  Atlantic Council in Washington, DC, nonresident senior fellow

“I would be lying if I said there won’t be any impact on regular, average Syrian civilians,” said Jomana Qaddour, a nonresident senior fellow at the Atlantic Council in Washington, DC.

“But I think that there are some robust humanitarian exceptions that explicitly discuss food, medicine, and on top of that there’s a lot of civil society organizations that will be monitoring the impact of Caesar,” she said.

Qaddour, who has family in Syria, hopes that the sanctions eventually bring the Syrian government to the negotiating table.

“The hope of these sanctions was that … listen, clearly, [the] military threat hasn’t worked. Upwards of a million people being killed hasn’t worked. Creating half of Syria as a refugee population outside of the country hasn’t worked. Maybe economic pressures might do the trick,” Qaddour said.

For the sanctions to be lifted, the Syrian government will have to fulfill six major demands. Among them, it has to end the bombing of civilians, release tens of thousands of detainees and allow Syrian refugees to return safely to their country.

This writer is grappling with the paradox of public parks in Paris

This writer is grappling with the paradox of public parks in Paris

Writer
Adam Wernick

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The Medici Fountain is a must-see highlight of the Jardin du Luxembourg. Writer John Freeman has spent much time in this park, contemplating humanity’s place in the natural world and how parks shape and change us.

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Joe deSousa/Flickr CC 1.0

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A new book of poetry by John Freeman, “The Park,” uses the Luxembourg Gardens in Paris as a lens to peer into the paradox of how public green space can provide refuge and access to beauty for some while excluding others.

For the last five or six years, Freeman has spent his summers and winters in Paris. Most of the time, he lives near the Luxembourg Gardens, so it has become “a kind of second home” to him, he said.

“I’ve studied it and lived in it and grieved in it, and missed people in it and met friends in it. So, to me, it feels like another part of my mental circulatory system,” Freeman said.

As the United States has “gone through this spasm of anxiety over what a citizen means,” Freeman said, he’s been spending much of his time in the park, which he now sees as “a kind of giant metaphor for how we live together and who we allow in and who we kick out.”

“I began to write poems in the park, not really thinking in those terms right away, just simply observing the park,” he said. “And gradually, as I transferred them from my notebook to my computer, I realized I was thinking about more than just a park, but about how we live together.”

RelatedConnecting with nature in the time of COVID-19

In his poems, Freeman explores the paradox of public parks being open to all, yet also finding ways to exclude some people. Paris, which has over 400 parks and gardens and some 1,000 fountains, has a long history of exclusion that continues to the present day, Freeman said.

The Luxembourg Palace, surrounded by the Jardin du Luxembourg in Paris, France.

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Rdevany, Wikimedia Commons CC BY-SA 3.0

“When I was living in Paris, especially in the last couple of years since the Syrian civil war, you would see migrants, some of whom who had even walked all the way to Paris from a war zone, living in the park,” he said. “Once Macron was elected, he was quite brutal about excluding migrants from public spaces, pushing them out of the city, pushing them out of parks. …

[T]he park encourages you to have a meditative and kind of expansive mode of thinking and people, once they’re in the park, tend to be pretty tolerant of being around each other, and yet there are all these official policies which say certain people are not allowed.”

But parks can also be spaces that open up the possibility of tenderness between people, between people and animals and between humans and the natural world, Freeman suggests.

“As a world, as a society, as a group of humans, I think we’re desperate for tenderness,” he said. “Because we’ve been seeing its opposite for so long — on broadcast and on social media and on all the ways that we get information. And right now, in the middle of this pandemic, I think people are rediscovering the power of tenderness because we’re with each other more.”

When you enter a park, such as the Luxembourg Gardens, Freeman believes “your way of thinking changes and your capacity to be around others expands.”

“There’s no better contrast than the difference between, say, being on Twitter, where you get none of the signals [of] face-to-face communication — tone of voice and body language, smells, touch. So, people are meaner to each other. They just are,” he said.

Cognitive scientists who study face-to-face communication versus computer-mediated communication confirm there is a great difference between the two, he said.

“The park is, to me, the ultimate retreat back into the full capacity of human-to-human communication, and in that sense, I think we need these spaces desperately.”

“The park is, to me, the ultimate retreat back into the full capacity of human-to-human communication, and in that sense, I think we need these spaces desperately,” Freeman insists. “We need places where people can get out of the spaces that bring out the worst in us [and] into those that bring out a more thoughtful register.”

RelatedGetting outside is a prescription for better health

“We’ve been sold, through the internet, this idea of public space online, which tends, I think in many ways, to destroy actual physical public space because it draws people into these imaginary spaces, these digital spaces, whereas the public ones are not used as much as they used to be,” he continues. “But I hope this pause, as horrible as it’s going to be — if we can get through it, if we can survive it — makes us remember that public space can be a really beautiful, enlarging thing, especially parks. That they’re there for us to be in to share with other people, that there’s nothing so beautiful as sitting on a park bench and having a picnic. Whatever you’re eating, it’s ennobled by a tree looking down on you, and if we get out of this I think there’s going to be a flood of people going to parks.”

Parks can also be a place of discovery or self-soothing, a place where a small detail can instill a particular feeling or desire. One of Freeman’s poems, “The Folded Wing,” expresses this experience: 

The lone duck in
Medici Fountain
slips her beak
beneath a wing
and falls asleep.
Drifting like a
hat tossed into
a green pond.
How good it feels
to be one’s own
comfort, to discover
all the warmth we
need buried in
our bodies. Yes
we bleed, we are
broken, we get
just one body, yet,
there it lies most of
the time, calling
to us, saying, rest here,
lie down in me, I
am more than less
than you, even in a
world that treats
us as two.

“There is something enormously comforting about being in a world where nature abounds,” Freeman said. “And when you can find a space, a public space, where, even if it’s built, even if it’s crafted, even if it’s kind of a fiction, you’re around trees and ducks and birds and animals and light and air and shade and insects and water, you feel this sort of age-old force calling to you.”

This article is based on an interview with Jenny Doering that aired on Living on Earth from PRX.

Juneteenth celebrations take on new significance; Australia says China involved in cyberattacks; Anti-poverty program in Indonesia also helps save forests

Juneteenth celebrations take on new significance; Australia says China involved in cyberattacks; Anti-poverty program in Indonesia also helps save forests

By
The World staff

The sun rises on the Lincoln Memorial on Juneteenth — the day celebrating the emancipation of African American slaves more than a century and a half ago, in Washington, DC, June 19, 2020.

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Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

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Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

Today is Juneteenth, a 155-year-old holiday celebrating the emancipation of African Americans from slavery. This year, Juneteenth has taken new significance amid protests against systemic racism and police brutality in the US that sparked a global movement. Weeks of demonstrations and mounting demands to end police brutality and racial bias are expected to animate rallies today in cities across the US, but also Canada and elsewhere around the world.

Though it is not a federal holiday, Juneteenth is recognized in 47 US states and the District of Columbia as an official state holiday or observance. Texas became the first state to recognize the holiday in 1980. But many African American communities have been celebrating it since 1865.

Union dockworkers at nearly 30 ports along the West Coast planned to mark the occasion today by staging a one-day strike. But much of the focus of the annual observance will take place online — with lectures, discussion groups and virtual breakfasts — to help safeguard minority communities especially hard-hit by the pandemic.

Listen to The World today for a conversation with Mona Boyd, an African American who has spent the past 30 years living in Accra, Ghana, where she just returned from a Juneteenth celebration.

Also: ‘Willful amnesia’: How Africans forgot — and remembered — their role in the slave trade

What The World is following

China said Friday it has charged two detained Canadians for suspected espionage. Former diplomat Michael Kovrig and businessman Michael Spavor were arrested in late 2018 soon after Canadian authorities arrested Meng Wanzhou, Huawei chief financial officer, in Vancouver on a US warrant. The indictments could result in life imprisonment.

Australia suggested today that China was the chief suspect in a number of cyberattacks on the Australian government. Prime Minister Scott Morrison said a “sophisticated state-based actor” had spent months trying to hack essential service providers and critical infrastructure operators and all levels of the government. China has dismissed the accusation.

From The WorldAnti-poverty program in Indonesia also helps save forests, study shows

Sumbanese villagers work on a field seeding peanuts in Hamba Praing village, Kanatang district, East Sumba Regency, East Nusa Tenggara province, Indonesia, Feb. 23, 2020.

Credit:

Willy Kurniawan/Reuters 

Helping Indonesia’s poorest people could save the nation’s forests, too, a new study shows. Indonesia is one of the most rapidly deforested places on Earth, and nearly 10% of the population lives below the poverty line.

These struggles are not separate, conflicting issues — but deeply intertwined — the study from Science Advances says. The study shows that where people received services from a national anti-poverty program, 30% fewer trees were cleared — and about half of the saved forests were old-growth.

SCOTUS ruled in favor of DACA. A permanent solution is still needed, advocates say.

Thursday’s much-anticipated ruling ended a yearslong legal battle around how the Trump administration ended Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals and provides some relief to the more than 650,000 DACA recipients in the country. But advocates say there’s still a long road ahead in the fight for more permanent protections for DACA recipients.

Morning focus

Among the many celebrations today for Juneteenth, here’s something special from Yo-Yo Ma and Rhiannon Giddens.

There are so many stories made invisible: too-often-violent histories hidden beneath the surfaces of our cities, our institutions, our music. It’s our job to make them visible. I’m honored to mark #Juneteenth with a new song by @RhiannonGiddens. #blacklivesmatter #songsofchange pic.twitter.com/RraYnGiwzT

— Yo-Yo Ma (@YoYo_Ma) June 19, 2020In case you missed itListen: US Supreme Court issues ruling on DACA

DACA recipients and their supporters celebrate outside the US Supreme Court after the court ruled in a 5-4 vote that President Donald Trump’s 2017 move to rescind the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program was unlawful, in Washington, DC, June 18, 2020.

Credit:

Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

In a much-anticipated decision issued Thursday morning, the US Supreme Court ruled against the Trump administration’s attempt to cancel Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA. And, a new study shows how an anti-poverty program has an unexpected benefit when it comes to saving Indonesian forests. Also, farmers in China turned to livestreaming to sell off their produce during the coronavirus lockdown. It turns out the technique worked so well that some farmers are planning to continue with the online trend.

Don’t forget to subscribe to The World’s Latest Edition podcast using your favorite podcast player: RadioPublicApple PodcastsStitcherSoundcloudRSS.